Category Archives: Colloquia

MIT Professor to Deliver Kliakhandler Lectures

stanleyThe Second Annual Kliakhandler Lectures will be held Sept. 29-30 at Michigan Tech. Richard Stanley of MIT will deliver the lectures which are sponsored by the Mathematical Sciences and funded by a generous gift from former faculty member Igor Kliakhandler.

The Kliakhandler lecture series brings a top mathematician to campus each year to give a pair of lectures.Stanley is a prolific mathematician who has won numerous honors, is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a Fellow of the American Mathematical Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has won the Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics’ George Pólya Prize in Applied Combinatorics, the Leroy P. Steele Prize for Mathematical Exposition from the American Mathematical Society and the Rolf Schock Prize for Mathematics.

His first lecture is from 5 to 6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 29 in Dow 641. Stanley’s lecture will be “Plane Tilings,” in which he will discuss the challenges of filling a planar region with a given collection of shapes (tiles).  A jigsaw puzzle is a familiar type of tiling, though it is not very mathematical; decorative tile floors often use plane tiling to create an aesthetic effect. The physicist Roger Penrose created a family of tilings that are known as Penrose tilings.

Stanley will survey some interesting mathematics associated with plane tilings and discuss questions such as the following: Is there a tiling? If so, how many are there? If no tiling exists, how can we prove this? What special properties, such as symmetry, can a tiling possess? These questions involve such subjects as combinatorics, group theory, probability theory, number theory and computer science.

From 1 to 2 p.m. Friday, Sept. 30 in Fisher 138, Stanley will deliver a colloquium entitled “A Survey of Alternating Permutations.” Permutations are fundamental transformations in mathematics, and alternating permutations comprise one of the most important families of permutations. Stanley will discuss several aspects of the theory of alternating permutations and describe applications to topics such as group theory and geometry.


Nick Trefethen to Speak at Michigan Tech

Nick Trefethen of Oxford University will deliver a lecture
“Discrete or Continuous?” at 5:05 p.m. on Monday, April 27, in Fisher 325.

Trefethen has received many honors for this research in Numerical Analysis:

  • Fellow of the Royal Society
  • Member of the National Academy of Engineering
  • The Gold Medal from the Institute for Mathematics and its Applications (UK)
  • The Naylor Prize from the London Mathematical Society

He is past-president of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics and he has the distinction of being the first customer to buy a copy of Matlab.

Trefethen describes his talk as follows: “As old as any issue in science and mathematics is the polarity between discrete and continuous. The details change from century to century, but a synthesis still challenges us. In this talk I will comment on some of the long history and current state of interplay between these two ways of thinking.”

The public is welcome.

From Tech Today


Radial Basis Functions – Freedom from meshes in scientific computing: Developments and Applications

Mathematical Sciences Colloquium
Michigan Technological University
March 27, 2015
1:05 p.m.
Fisher 101

Radial Basis Functions – Freedom from meshes in scientific computing: Developments and Applications

Natasha Flyer

Institute of Mathematics Applied to Geosciences,
National Center for Atmospheric Research

Bengt Fornberg

University of Colorado
Boulder, Colorado

Flyer Fornberg-03-27-15


Radial basis functions method

Mathematical Sciences Colloquium
Michigan Technological University
March 26, 2015
1:05 p.m.
Fisher 326

A fast algorithm for distributing nodes with variable density

Natasha Flyer

Institute of Mathematics Applied to Geosciences,
National Center for Atmospheric Research

Flyer-03-26-15

Numerical Quadrature over the Surface of a Sphere

Bengt Fornberg

University of Colorado
Boulder, Colorado

Fornberg-03-26-15