Author: Katie Torrey

Are there any upcoming peer mentoring workshops?

Yes! Here’s the current schedule for this semester. These are informal chats. Leave early, come late as your schedule permits.

Fall 2022

*Subscribe to the ChE advising events calendar for the most current date/time/location information.

Topic Date* Time* Location*
Student Organizations: Learn about how and why to involved in student orgs. Wednesday, September 7th 6:30 pm Chem Sci 215
Resumes: Bring your resume, even if it’s just a draft. Wednesday, September 14th 6:30 pm Chem Sci 215
Co-ops/Internships: What it’s like to do a co-op/internships and interview tips. Monday, September19th 7:00 pm Chem Sci 215
Preparing for Exams: Learn about campus resources to help you prepare for mid-terms. Tuesday, September 27th 6:30 pm Chem Sci 215
Enterprise: What it’s like to be on an Enterprise team. Wednesday, October 5th 5:00 pm Chem Sci 310
Registration: Start preparing for spring registration with tips on how to plan your schedule. Wednesday, October 12th 6:30 pm Chem Sci 215
Minors: Minor options and how to fit it in with your major requirements. Wednesday, October 19th 6:30 pm Chem Sci 215
Junior ChE Courses: If you’ll be taking junior-level ChE classes next semester then stop by for help planning your classes. Tuesday, October 25th 5:00 pm Chem Sci 310
Sophomore ChE Courses: If you’ll be taking sophomore-level ChE classes next semester then stop by for help planning your classes. Wednesday, October 26th 5:00 pm Chem Sci 310
First-year Courses: If you’ll be taking first-year classes next semester then stop by for help planning your classes. Tuesday, November 1st 5:00 pm Chem Sci 310
Research: What it’s like to do undergraduate research with a faculty member and how to find a research mentor. Tuesday, November 29th 6:30 pm Chem Sci 215
First-Semester Recap: How did your first semester go? Tell us about it. Tuesday, December 6th 5:00 pm Chem Sci 310

How do I run a degree audit for the correct catalog year?

Keep the default selection of “Latest” to run your degree audit with the correct catalog year. Don’t select a major from the drop-down list.

If you select a major from the drop-down list then this will run what is called a “What-if Audit”.  The what-if audits are for students who are considering changing majors and always run with the newest catalog year.

How do I fit in a co-op?

Be prepare for a co-op to delay your graduation by one year because of the order that the ChE classes need to be taken. These classes are also only offered in certain semesters. You can use this as an opportunity to fit in two co-op experiences. The table below shows one way to do this. Another option is to use the extra semester to spread out your classes and/or fit in a minor or study abroad.

Year Fall Semester Spring Semester Summer Semester
First Year Classes.
Take calc I plus all the usual fall freshman classes. Most of these classes are offered in the fall, spring, and summer.
Classes.
Take calc II plus all the usual spring freshman classes. Most of these classes are offered in the fall, spring, and summer.
Open.
Work and take a break.
Second Year Classes.
Take the usual fall sophomore classes. Some of these classes are only offered in the fall and summer.
Classes.
Take the usual spring sophomore classes. Most of these classes are offered in the fall, spring, and summer.
Co-op 1.
On first co-op for 6 months (summer-fall)
Third Year Co-op 1.
On first co-op for 6 months (summer-fall)
Classes.
Take the usual fall junior classes. These classes are offered in the fall and spring and are prereqs for the spring junior classes.
Co-op 2.
On second co-op for 6 months (summer-fall)
Fourth Year Co-op 2.
On second co-op for 6 months (summer-fall)
Classes.
Take the usual spring junior classes. These classes are only offered in the spring and are prereqs for the fall senior classes.
Open.
Finding a summer internship is usually easier when you have previous co-op experience.
Fifth Year Classes.
Take the usual fall senior classes. These classes are only offered in the fall and are prereqs for the spring senior classes.
Classes.
Take the usual spring senior classes. These classes are only offered in the spring.
Graduated!!
Start your full-time job with a significant amount of industrial experience!

What information needs be in my capstone design abstract?

Your project summary will need to addresses the following topics. If your project is though an Enterprise team then you’ll use the Enterprise project template.

Background

This is a brief description of the context of the project.

Functional Requirements

This is what the device or process should be able to do.

Realistic Constraints

These are your design boundaries. You are required to address the following.

  • Engineering Codes and Standards. Codes are legally enforceable, such as ASME BPV, OSHA, 1990 Clean Air Act, RCRA, CERCLA (Superfund), etc. Standards are best practices, such as TEMA, ASTM, etc.
  • Economic Factors. Examples are process or product cost, market pricing, market opportunities, target markets, pricing, minimum selling price, availability of raw materials, etc.
  • Physical Limitations. Examples are size, weight, ergonomics, user interface, service life, ability to operate in a hazardous environment, etc.
  • Health and Safety Issues. Examples are laboratory practices, OSHA regulations, operator exposure to toxic chemicals, mechanical guarding, hot surfaces, fire and explosion situations, fail-safe mode, handling spills, etc.
  • Environmental Concerns. Examples are EPA regulations, identifying and handling air emissions and liquid/solid wastes, etc.
  • Ethical Conduct. Examples are adherence to codes of ethics from organizations like AIChE or the Order of the Engineer, responsible conduct of research, etc.
  • Include additional constraints when applicable. Examples are sustainability, manufacturability, constructability, social ramification, political factors, legal issues, etc.

Deliverables

These are the final outputs of your project. You are required to include an economic analysis as part of your deliverables. The analysis should considers economic factors from both customer and sponsor perspectives when possible. Describe your intended economic analysis and include the types of economic factors that will be considered.

Sponsor Interactions

If you have a sponsor, this is a description of how your sponsor is involved. Sponsors sometimes provide information and materials as well as communication throughout the project.

Team Organization

This is a description of your team. Include team member names, major, and year in school.

What needs to be in my senior design abstract for Enterprise?

Go to the Enterprise Student Resources page, Project Template section, and download the Enterprise Project Summary (all other majors). If there are other ChE students on your team who are also using the project for senior design then you should be submitting the same abstract.

There is a nice description of what to include in each section in the template. Use that as your guide. We will also be looking for additional information in the following sections based on our general abstract guidelines:

Anticipated Outcomes of the Student Team

In this section include an economic analysis as part of your project deliverables. This analysis should addresses economic factors from both customer and sponsor perspectives where possible. Give a brief description of your intended analysis and indicate the types of economic factors that will be considered.

Special Notes

In this section include a description of the realistic constraints. At a minimum specifically address each of the following, using the same subheadings:

  • Engineering Codes and Standards. Codes are legally enforceable, such as ASME BPV, OSHA, 1990 Clean Air Act, RCRA, CERCLA (Superfund), etc. Standards are best practices, such as TEMA, ASTM, etc.
  • Economic Factors. Examples are process or product cost, market pricing, market opportunities, target markets, pricing, minimum selling price, availability of raw materials, etc.
  • Physical Limitations. Examples are size, weight, ergonomics, user interface, service life, ability to operate in a hazardous environment, etc.
  • Health and Safety Issues. Examples are laboratory practices, OSHA regulations, operator exposure to toxic chemicals, mechanical guarding, hot surfaces, fire and explosion situations, fail-safe mode, handling spills, etc.
  • Environmental Concerns. Examples are EPA regulations, identifying and handling air emissions and liquid/solid wastes, etc.
  • Ethical Conduct. Examples are adherence to codes of ethics from organizations like AIChE or the Order of the Engineer, responsible conduct of research, etc.
  • Additional realistic constraints should also be addressed where applicable. This may include: sustainability, manufacturability, constructability, social ramification, political factors, legal issues, etc.

Michigan Tech to Provide

In this section include a description of your team make-up including team member names, their major, and their year in school.

What is the difference between a co-op and an internship?

A co-op is usually longer and during the school year. An internship is usually shorter and during the summer.

It is usually easier to find a co-op than a summer internship.

You can earn college credit while working by taking the co-op class. During the fall and spring semesters some students need student status for financial aid or insurance reasons. In this case, you will need to enroll in the co-op class or some other online course. During the summer, in most cases, it is up to you on whether or not to seek the co-op credit.