Tag: Atmospheric

Swarup China is an Outstanding Scholar

Swarup China
Swarup China

The Graduate School and Graduate Student Government proudly announce the 2014-2015 academic year winners.

Swarup China, a recent PhD graduate in Atmospheric Sciences, is a recipient of the Outstanding Scholarship Award. The award recognizes academic performance in areas such as excellent GPA, originality in research, leadership and teamwork.

Read more at Tech Today.


DeVlieg Foundation Fellowship for Joseph Niehaus

Joseph NiehausGraduate student Joseph Niehaus is a recipient of the DeVlieg Foundation Graduate Student Fellowship for Engineering students. Niehaus is a PhD student in the interdisciplinary Atmospheric Sciences program at Michigan Tech. His advisor is Will Cantrell.

The DeVlieg Foundation has generously provided support for graduate students pursuing research in engineering, wildlife, and biology at Michigan Tech. The award is strongly competitive. The panel was impressed with Joseph Niehaus’ research, publication record, and contribution to the mission of Michigan Tech. He will receive support in the form of stipend plus one-credit of tuition for summer 2015.


Proposals in Progress January 5, 2015

PI Will Cantrell and Co-PIs Claudio Mazzoleni and Raymond Shaw (Physics/EPSSI), “A Coupled Laboratory and Modeling Investigation of the Mechanisms of Primary Ice Production in Arctic Stratus Clouds,” US Department of Energy

PI Claudio Mazzoleni (Physics/EPSSI) and Co-PIs Lynn Mazzoleni (Chem/EPSSI), Will Cantrell (Physics/EPSSI), Judith Perlinegr (CEE/EPSSI), Sarah Green (Chem/EPSSI) and Bo Zhang (CEE/EPSSI), “Free Tropospheric and Marine Boundary Layer Aerosol Interactions in the North Atlantic,” US DOE

Read more at Tech Today.


Proposals in Progress November 20, 2014

PI Andrew Barnard and Co-PIs Scott Miers (MEEM) and Yoke Khin Yap (Physics), “Carbon Nanotube Speaker Efficiency Improvement and Prototype Design,” US Department of Defense, Office of Naval Research

PI Will Cantrell (Physics/EPSSI), “Collaborative Research: Bottom-Up Cloud Modeling: Building Molecular Level Foundations for Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation in Clouds,” Clemson University

PI Ranjit Pati (Physics), “Collaborative Research: Parallel Fabrication of CNT-Based Spin Transistors Toward Post-CMOS Molecular Scale Spin Logic,” NSF

Read more at Tech Today.


Mazzoleni on the Future of Pico Mountain Observatory

Atlantic observatory faces rocky future
Mountaintop facility in Azores can track pollution from North America.

For the past 13 years, atmospheric scientists have been tasting the air above Pico Mountain, a dormant volcano in the Azores archipelago. From a perch at 2,225 metres, just below the mountain’s summit, the Pico observatory can dip directly into the gases and particulates that sweep across the Atlantic Ocean.

Other high-altitude stations in the oceans, such as on the Canary Islands, are closer to Africa, and their measurements can be influenced by dust and particles from biomass burning, says Claudio Mazzoleni, an atmospheric physicist at MTU. “In the case of Pico it’s north enough to get mostly air coming from North America and travelling to Europe,” he says. “There isn’t any other place that is on that path at that elevation.”

Read more at Nature, by Alexandra Witze.

Nature, one of the top science journals in the world, published a news article about the Pico Observatory atmospheric research of Associate Professor Claudio Mazzoleni (Physics) and Associate Professor Lynn Mazzoleni (Chem).

From Tech Today.


Super-Terminal Raindrops Verified

Warp-Speed Raindrops

It’s a rain race out there. In the meteorological equivalent of breaking the light-speed barrier, new research shows that the smaller droplets in a rainstorm often surpass what appears to be the speed limit for rain.

“What surprised us was not so much seeing the superterminal drops,” says physicist and co-author Raymond Shaw of MTU, “but seeing the deeper, compelling patterns.” He explains that as rain falls harder, the fraction of superterminal, or speeding, small drops increases.

Read more at Science Magazine, by Phil Berardelli. This article was posted on June 12, 2009.

Geophysical Research Letters 2014
Geophysical Research Letters 2014

Further evidence for super-terminal raindrops
M. L. Larsen1, A. B. Kostinski and A.R. Jameson
DOI: 10.1002/2014GL061397

A network of optical disdrometers (including laser precipitation monitors and a 2-dimensional video disdrometer) was utilized to determine whether the recent reports of “super-terminal” raindrops were spurious results of drop breakup occurring on instrumentation. Results unequivocally show that super-terminal raindrops at small (less than 1 mm) sizes are ubiquitous, are measurable over an extended area, and appear in every rain event investigated.

Read more at Geophysical Research Letters, published by Wiley Online Library in 2014.

Confirmed: Some raindrops fall faster than they should

Five years ago, scientists reported that raindrops, especially small ones, often fall through the air much faster than they should. Some researchers have suggested that these “super-terminal” raindrops (ones traveling more than 30% faster than their terminal velocity, at which air resistance prevents further acceleration due to gravity) were fragments of larger drops that had splattered off the team’s instruments, with the smaller bits retaining the speed the larger drop had before it struck the instrument. But new research hints that the speedier-than-expected drops are the result of natural processes—and that, moreover, they make up a substantial fraction of rainfall.

Read more at Science Magazine, by Sid Perkins. This article was posted on August 26, 2014.


Michigan Tech Faculty, Researchers Endorse Michigan’s 25% by 2025 Renewable Energy Initiative

More than a dozen Michigan Tech faculty members and researchers have gone on the record in support of a ballot initiative designed to give a big boost to the state’s renewable energy industry. If passed by the voters in November, the initiative would require that 25 percent of Michigan’s electricity be generated using renewable energy sources by the year 2025. Among the signers is assistant professor of physics Claudio Mazzoleni. READ MORE


Cloud Chemistry

NSF funds will build a cloud chamber.
By Lynn Mazzoleni
In addition to interesting cloud chemistry questions, physics professors Raymond Shaw (lead PI), Will Cantrell, and Claudio Mazzoleni intend to study aerosol and cloud physics in the chamber. The group plans to conduct experiments in parallel whenever feasible, to better link the chemical and physical properties of aerosols. READ MORE
CHeMnOTeS, Michigan Tech Department of Chemistry 2011 Newsletter


Michigan Tech Researchers to Study Atmospheric Aerosols at PICO Mountain Research Observatory

In 2001, Richard Honrath established an atmospheric research station on the top of Mt. Pico, a cold, lonely, extinct volcano in the Azores. Mt. Pico is the highest point in the Portuguese island chain and the only spot in the mid-Atlantic where the air is high enough to escape the effects of the ocean environment. Wife and husband Lynn and Claudio Mazzoleni have received separate grants to characterize aerosols at the PICO Mountain Observatory. Lynn Mazzoleni, an assistant professor of chemistry, will focus on understanding aerosols’ chemistry and how they interact with sunlight. Claudio Mazzoleni, an assistant professor of physics, is a coinvestigator on the project and is lead investigator on a related two-year, $300,000 US Department of Energy grant to characterize how much sunlight aerosols are reflecting or absorbing and how their reflective properties change as they drift across the cloud-covered Atlantic. READ MORE