Category: In Print

In Print

Mark Rhodes (SS), William Price (Ball State University) and Amy Walker (Cardiff University) have an edited volume titled Geographies of Post-Industrial Place, Memory, and Heritage due in print as part of Routledge’s Sustainable Urbanism Series November 23rd, 2020.

All industrialization is deeply rooted within the specific geographies in which it took place, and echoes of previous industrialization continue to reverberate in these places through to the modern day. This book investigates the overlap of memory and the impacts of industrialization within today’s communities and the senses of place and heritage that grew alongside and in reaction to the growth of industry.


In Print

Chelsea Schelly (SS) along with Emily Prehoda (EEP PhD Grad) and colleagues from The Nature Conservancy (Jessica Price) and Defenders of Wildlife (Aimee Delach and Rupak Thapaliya), have published “Ratepayer Perspectives on Mid- to Large-Scale Solar Development on Long Island, NY: Lessons for Reducing Siting Conflict through Supported Development Types” in Energies.


In Print

Adam Wellstead (SS) published “Trusting Datification Through Labification,” In: Sullivan H., Dickinson H., Henderson H. (eds) The Palgrave Handbook of the Public Servant. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham.

This chapter examines the trust and big data literature, describing the current state of play internationally. It then questions whether the trend of policy innovation labs (PILs) can provide new pathways forward for government in the management of data, and retaining citizen trust. PILs play a critical role in governments’ attempts to address big data issues. They often provide an experimental environment where innovative tools and techniques can be employed. Critically, they use tools and techniques that foster trust and collaboration, which means they may go some way to address the much-debated trust deficit around big data


Don Lafreniere presents at International Seminar on Urban Form

Don LafreniereDon Lafreniere (SS/GLRC) along with colleagues Dayne Walling (U Minnesota) and Rick Sadler (Michigan State) presented a paper entitled “Rust Belt Cities as Exemplars for Urban Development Practice in a Low-Growth Future” at the International Seminar on Urban Form.

The paper outlines how slow- or no-growth communities in the American Rust Belt have responded to the socio-spatial processes shaping land use, development, and revitalization despite a long history of racial segregation and political fragmentation. The paper highlights the importance of community groups and civic networks in responding to these challenges in depopulating urban regions.