Category: In Print

On the Road and In Print

Dr. Steven Walton presented a paper on “Allied Expositionary Forces: War Trophies in America after the Great War” at the Society for Military History conference in Fort Worth, TX on April 29. The work is an extension of the WWI centenary activities developed on campus in 2018 (World War One and the Copper Country) and his work for the edited book, Home Front in the American Heartland: Local Experiences and Legacies of WWI (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2020)


In Print

Hongmei Lu ’20 (Ph.D., environmental and energy policy) and Shan Zhou (SS) have published a co-authored paper in the Journal of Asian Public Policy.

The paper is titled “Using policy goal ambiguity to manage policy goal conflicts: Sponge-City Program implementation in old neighborhoods.”

The paper uses a case study to understand how local policy implementers take advantages of policy goal ambiguity to maximize the policy outcomes of urban stormwater management program in China, given constrained resources and budget.


In Print

A collaborative research team’s work on energy sovereignty has recently been published in the Routledge Handbook of Energy Democracy. Co-authors of “Energy democracy in practice: Centering energy sovereignty in rural communities and Tribal Nations” include Chelsea Schelly, Valoree Gagnon, Andrew Fiss, Elise Matz, Rebecca Ong and Kathy Halvorsen of Michigan Tech, along with Douglas Bessette, Laura Schmitt Olabisi and Kristin Arola of Michigan State University.

Learn more about the work via the Michigan Tech Digital Commons.


In Print

Adam Wellstead is the lead author of a study published in Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability.

The paper, titled “Finding the sweet spot in climate policy: balancing stakeholder engagement with bureaucratic autonomy,” discusses the role of bureaucratic autonomy and stakeholder engagement in the climate change policy process and the “sweet spot” between both — which differs from country to country depending on administrative tradition and policy style.

Robbert Biesbroek of Wageningen University in The Netherlands is a co-author of the paper.


On the Road

Shan Zhou (SS) presented her paper “The Interplay between Renewable Portfolio Standard and Voluntary Green Power Market in the United States” in the session “Determinants and Challenges of Environmental Policy” at the the 78th Annual Midwest Political Science Association (MPSA) Conference, which was held virtually April 14-18.

This paper evaluates the efficacy of utility-based voluntary green power programs implemented in conjunction with government-led (mandatory) renewable energy policies.


In Print

Professor Emeritus Barry D. Solomon (SS) and Shan Zhou (SS) published the article “Renewable Portfolio Standards: Do Voluntary Goals vs. Mandatory Standards Make a Difference?” In Review of Policy Research.

This paper investigates whether an obligation to meet a Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) target in U.S. states affects the policy effectiveness. A voluntary RPS target can serve as a political device for signaling a commitment to certain goals, though there is no penalty if the goal is not met.

Alternatively, mandatory RPS targets have varying stringency and uneven enforcement. Our results indicate that the compulsoriness of a state RPS is an insignificant determinant of RPS‐related renewable electricity capacity additions. Factors other than compulsoriness are more important in influencing renewable electricity development, such as state political ideology, income, electricity price and electric market deregulation status.