Category Archives: In Print

Public Participatory Historical GIS

Don Lafreniere (SS), Dan Trepal (IHA PhD candidate-SS), Sarah Fayen Scarlett (SS), John Arnold (SS), Robert Pastel (CS), and Ryan Williams (GRF), along with Luke Weidner (Colorado School of Mines) recently published “Public participatory historical GIS” in Historical Methods: A Journal of Quantitative and Interdisciplinary History. In this article the authors call for a new approach to historical geographic information system (HGIS) study that includes public partnership to build HGIS datasets.


Henquinet Publishes on Evangelical American Aid in Korea and Vietnam During the 1950s and 1960s

Kari Henquinet

Kari Henquinet (SS and Pavlis Honors College) recently published the article “American World Visions of Vulnerabilty:  The Sacred, the Secular, and Roots of Evangelical American Aid” in Research in Economic Anthropology, Volume 38, Emerald Publishing Limited, pp.199 – 222. In this article, Henquinet analyzes “constructions of and responses to vulnerability in the US government and the evangelical aid organization, World Vision, during the 1950s and 1960s in Korea and Vietnam.”

 






Durfee Co-Authors Book on Arctic Governance

Arctic GovernanceMary Durfee (professor emerita at Michigan Tech) and Rachael Lorna Johnstone’s (University of Akureyri, Iceland and the University of Greenland) have published a new book, Arctic Governance in a Changing World with Rowan and Littlefield.

Arctic Governance in a Changing World provides a succinct yet precise account of the contemporary Arctic in the context of international relations and international law to explain the people and processes that govern the Arctic.

The book begins with an overview of the Arctic in light of its inextricable relation to the wider world. An explanation of environmental and political change in the Arctic follows. The book shows how various players in Arctic decision-making influence different spheres of governance. Security in the Arctic is analyzed in terms of both national and human security. Arctic economies are presented and then explored from a political economy perspective, including free trade issues and the influence of China. The book is strong on human and indigenous rights and explains how these rights constrain state and corporate behavior. It shows how the law of the sea in the Arctic determines resource allocation. Unique in a textbook about international relations is a chapter on Arctic shipping. The book explains how (and to what extent) international environmental law protects the vulnerable Arctic and its inhabitants in times of climate change. It concludes with an analysis of resilient governance in the Arctic.




Angie Carter’s Communities and Research Class Shares Food Access Project Research

Garrett Neese/Daily Mining Gazette. Angie Carter, center, and students Courtney Archambeau, left, and Jack Wilson.

Students from Angie Carter’s Communities and Research class (SS4700) presented their semester research project at the Social Sciences Brown Bag. The project looked at food access in Houghton, Hancock, and Michigan Tech. An article on the presentation was featured in the Daily Mining Gazette.