I am a freshman. Can I join an Enterprise team?

Freshman may join an enterprise, however we generally do not recommend it.

During the spring semester you may enroll in ENT 1960. Be aware that this class does *not* count towards your technical electives like the other enterprise project-work classes do.  ENT 1960 only counts as a free elective. Our chemical engineering degree requires only three credits of free electives and many students will have their free elective requirement met with other classes or a minor.

We do not recommend that you join an Enterprise team in your first year since most students usually have a pretty heavy credit load and are still adjusting to college life. Also involvement in an Enterprise team can take up a lot of time.  We want you to have a good start to your college career so that you have the ability to participate in things like Enterprise or AIChE later on.

If you are interested in a particular Enterprise team, ask if you may attend their weekly team meetings.  That will give you an opportunity to learn more about the Enterprise team, how it functions and about their current projects.  You may then join the Enterprise and begin participating during your second year by signing up for ENT 2950 in the fall.  Unlike ENT 1960, ENT 2950 will count towards your technical electives.  ENT 2950 is on the engineering list.

Are any of the chemical engineering classes offered online?

Yes!  During Summer 2015 both CM 2110 Fundamentals of ChE I and CM 2120 Fundamentals of ChE II will be offered online.  Be sure to enroll in the online sections (1OL, time TBA).  CM2110 is a mass and energy balance course, and usually uses the text by Felder and Rousseau.  CM2120 is a first course in separations, and uses Wankat.  These courses must be completed before you can take the fall semester junior chemical engineering classes.

On occasion other CM classes are offered online.  Please check the Registrar’s website for an up-to-date listing.

Which math lab section do I enroll in?

The calculus math classes, MA 1160 and MA 1161 (calc I), MA 2160 (calc II), and MA 3160 (multivariable calc), require that you enroll in corresponding recitation and lab sections.  For example, if you are enrolling in R01 then you also will need to enroll in L01.  R02 enrolls in L02, R03 enrolls in L03, etc.  If you do not enroll in the corresponding recitation/lab sections then you will get a registration link error.

Where can I get help at Michigan Tech?

There are many support services for students at Michigan Tech, and the best place to look for the kind of help you need is the Student Support Services page of the Michigan Tech Student Handbook.  There are links there for Counseling and Wellness Services, Career Services, Disability Services, and many more types of student services.

For help with academic subjects, please see our FAQ page on Where can I get help with my course work?.

Where can I get help with my course work?

Michigan Tech has in place many resources to offer if you find you need help with the challenging chemical engineering curriculum.  Resources include:

In addition, there are some web-based resources that may be helpful with chemical engineering subjects:

  • Khan Academy – This website has a large number of short videos that can help with math, statistics, chemistry, physics and other subjects.
  • DrMorrisonMTU – Michigan Tech’s own Dr. Morrison has a YouTube channel with short videos on mass and energy balance problems as well as fluid mechanics problems.  Email her with suggestions for new videos for the site.
  • LearnChemE – The University of Colorado at Boulder with support of the National Science Foundation has created a large website of screencast lectures on chemical engineering topics.  If you find some favorite videos on this site, please let us know and we’ll share them with your classmates.

What are the general education (Gen Ed; HASS) requirements for the chem eng degree?

The General Education requirements for all degrees at Michigan Tech are the same, and they are most accurately explained on the Registrar’s General Education web page.  Please go there or attend an advising meeting to have the details of the General Education requirements explained.  We recently made a video guiding you through the General Education process for Chemical Engineers.  The ECE deparment’s advisor Judy Donahue also has a General Education video on YouTube you may find helpful (she shows a bit how Gen Ed looks on DARS (Degree Audit Reporting System, in Banweb)).

There a few aspects of Gen Ed that you should keep in mind:

1.  The rules can and do change; you must follow the rules that apply to you.  Your rules are the ones that are associated with your catalog year, that is, the year you started at Michigan Tech.  Your catalog year is listed on your Banner DARS page.

2.  Not all Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences courses count as HASS electives.  You must choose your HASS electives from the supplied lists and follow the prescriptions associated with the list.

3.  Not all physical education classes count as co-curriculars.

4.  Six credits of your HASS credits must be at the upper division level (3000+).

4.  Failure to follow the General Education rules will prevent you from being awarded your degree.  Please think ahead and choose your courses to comply with the University’s Gen Ed requirements.

How do prerequisite classes affect my degree planning?

Success in prerequisite classes leads to success in your chemical engineering classes. The table in the Chemical Engineering Prerequisite Map handout shows which engineering, science, and mathematics courses are required prerequisites to each required chemical engineering class.  Use this handy table to plan your graduation schedule.  All prerequisite requirements are listed as well on the Registrar’s page in the course listings there.

I have transfer credit for the wrong Physics!

John Jaszczak <jaszczak@mtu.edu> Tue, Apr 10, 2012 at 9:57 AM

To: “advisor-l” <advisor-l@mtu.edu>

Dear Advisors,


For many years the physics department has worked with students who for various reasons (transfer credit, AP credit, etc) might have credit for College Physics (PH1110 and PH1210 and the labs), but need credit for calculus-based University Physics (PH2100 PH2200).  In order to better serve more students and assist their advisors, we have developed proficiency exams for PH2100 and PH2200, along with a policy statement and a request form.

If you advise students who need PH2100 and/or PH2200 and who might already have credit for the “wrong” physics, please see the attached documents.  Through our new system, students will no longer need to wait till finals week to be able to take a proficiency exam, which we hope will make planning easier for them and for the advisors.  Please contact me if you have any questions.


Sincerely,
John Jaszczak
Physics Undergraduate Studies Committee

PH2100-2200_credit request form 2012.pdf

PH2100-PH2200 Department Placement Policy.pdf

Which linear algebra and differential equations classes should I take?

You have three options for linear algebra:  MA 2320, MA 2321, and MA 2330.

You have four options for differential equations:  MA 3520, MA 3521, MA 3530, and MA 3560.

If you plan to take linear algebra and differential equations in the same semester, then you must take the accelerated (7 week) versions of these classes:  MA 2321 (2 cr) and MA 3521 (2 cr).  MA 2321 is offered track A and MA 3521 is offered track B during the fall and spring semesters.  The advantage with the accelerated classes is that they allow you to complete both classes in one semester.  This is important if you plan to start junior CM classes in the next semester, as you must be done with all of your math to start taking junior CM classes.  The disadvantage with the accelerated classes is that the course material comes very quickly, and for this reason we do not recommend the accelerated classes to students who have struggled with math classes in the past or who feel they need more time to grasp math concepts.

If you plan to take linear algebra and differential equations in different semesters, then you can take either MA 2320 (2 cr) or MA 2330 (3 cr) in the first semester and then either MA 3520 (2 cr) or MA 3530 (3 cr, fall semester) or MA 3560 (3 cr, spring semester) in the second semester. There is additional course material in the three credit versions.  You may read the course descriptions by clicking on the CRN when doing a class search in Banweb or searching for course descriptions on the Registrar’s Office webpage.

If you have struggled in your previous math classes then we recommend the semester long, two credit classes (MA 2320 and MA 3520).

If you are interested in a math minor and/or pursuing an engineering graduate degree then we recommend the semester long, three credit classes (MA 2330 and MA 3530/3560).  The extra credits from the three credit math classes can be used towards your technical electives or free electives.  See the ChE advisor for more information on applying these additional credit towards either of these areas of your degree audit.

Why can’t I register for Linear Algebra/Differential Equations? I keep getting a registration error.

Make sure that you are enrolling in the correct course.

There are two courses named “Elementary Linear Algebra”:

  • MA 2320 Elementary Linear Algebra (2 cr – 14 week semester long course)
  • MA 2321 Elementary Linear Algebra (2 cr – 7 week accelerated course, track A)

There are also two courses named “Elementary Differential Equations”:

  • MA 3520 Elementary Differential Equations (2 cr – 14 week semester long course)
  • MA 3521 Elementary Differential Equations (2 cr – 7 week accelerated course, track B)

If you plan to take both linear algebra and differential equations in the same semester, then you must enroll in MA 2321 and MA 3521.  These courses are co-requisites.

If you only want or need to take one of these classes, then you must enroll in the semester long version of the class, either MA 2320 or MA 3520.