How do I apply for the new BS/MS in ChemE?

To apply for the BS/MS program you follow this procedure:

1.  Go to the Grad School website and go to the Admissions section and follow all instructions.
2.  In your “areas of interest” on the form, put “accelerated masters”.  This will signal that you’re applying for the BS/MS

All other application requirements for the BS/MS program are the same as for the MS program in general.  For more on the BS/MS in Chemical Engineering, go to the Advising website FAQ page.

Is there a standard course plan for a transfer student?

It is possible to transfer to Michigan Tech Chemical Engineering from a community college or from another university.  A standard path for this would be to take two years of college work at that other institution followed by a summer at Michigan Tech and then the usual junior and senior years of chemical engineering at Michigan Tech.  The two summer classes that must be taken are:

  • CM2110 Fundamentals of Chemical Engineering I
  • CM2120 Fundamentals of Chemical Engieering II

These two classes are prerequisites to junior classes in chemical engineering and they must be completed before you may begin your junior year in chemical engineering.  It is not possible to take these two classes at the same time as junior classes.  For this reason, students who wish to graduate with two years of transfer credit must plan on either three years at Michigan Tech or they must take these two courses the summer before they start Michigan Tech junior classes in chemical engineering.

The standard transfer plan, as discussed above, is available on our handouts page.

Do I need to bring anything to my appointment?

Yes.  Please be prepared.  Before your appointment, take a look at your transcript on Banweb.  It is important that you know exactly what classes are on it.

Bring the following with you to your appointment:

  1. The flowchart with classes crossed off that you’ve already completed and are currently taking.
  2. A list of any classes on your transcript that you don’t know where they belong on the flowchart.
  3. A list of classes that you plan to take next semester and beyond, even if it is a rough draft.  The semester planning worksheet will help with this.
  4. Anything we worked on during previous appointments.
  5. The folder containing advising handouts that you got during orientation or when you changed majors.

Copies of the advising handouts are also available on the department’s Advising Handouts webpage.  Appointments with an advisor may be made using the University email system.

A class that I planned to take is full. Can I still get into it?

Maybe.

If the course is a Chemical Engineering course, then email cmadvise@mtu.edu with your request.  We will increase capacity of almost any CM class, with only a few exceptions.  Lab sections cannot be expanded.

If the course is in another department, please contact the department or the instructor of the class with your request.

If you still are not able to get into the class then you should periodically check the enrollment until the semester starts.  If another student decides to drop the class then a seat will open up.  Remember that you can add/drop classes on Banweb from when registration opens through the first week of classes of that semester.

Senior UO and plant design classes are full. Can you get me into them?

Don’t worry.  Yes, we will get you into these classes.

The capacities (maximum number of students that can enroll) in these classes are purposely set low.  The reason that we do this is because we need to have the same number of students in each section as close as possible.  It is very difficult to predict how many seniors we will have with students leaving and returning from co-op.

If you cannot get into one or both of these classes, then you will need to email cmadvise@mtu.edu with the following information:

  1. Which class(es) you need to enroll in.
  2. Which section you prefer.
  3. Why you prefer that section.  Be specific.

You WILL get into the classes, however we cannot guarantee that you will get into the section that you prefer.  We do our best to match preferences whenever possible.

How much does it cost to go to grad school in chemical engineering?

Ph.D. study in chemical engineering is often paid for by research funds obtained by your grad-school faculty advisor, and thus it will not cost you anything if you are able to obtain such support.  In addition to receiving a tuition award, you will typically receive an offer of financial support for your living expenses.

When you apply to graduate school, you will automatically be considered for support, either in the form of a research assistantship, a teaching assistantship, or a fellowship.  These assistantships will usually include full tuition and fees.  It’s a great deal for which good students will often qualify, and it is not usually based on need, rather is based on merit.  There are also very prestigious graduate research fellowships offered by the National Science Foundation for the best students in the country.  If you are able to obtain an NSF graduate research fellowship, you will be highly courted by all the top graduate schools.  You must apply directly to NSF for these fellowships.

M.S. study in chemical engineering can be done either in coursework mode (never supported; you are charged tuition and fees) or in thesis mode (may be supported; may include a living stipend).  The two-year coursework masters has the advantage of being straightforward to get:  you apply, are admitted, take for the necessary courses, get your degree.  There is no research project.  The M.S. thesis path also starts with you applying and taking courses, but students are working from the beginning on a masters thesis that must be completed before the degree is awarded.  There are funded research projects that lead to the M.S., and it is competitive to obtain this funding.

For more on graduate school, please visit the Department’s website on graduate studies.

How can I prepare academically for graduate school in chemical engineering?

The first year of graduate school in chemical engineering typically involves taking advanced courses in transport, thermodynamics, kinetics, and mathematics (partial differential equations).  It may also involve specialty courses specific to your area of chosen specialization. Anything that makes those required courses easier is a good idea.  I feel that at Michigan Tech we do not go far enough in transport, so I recommend that you take the graduate transport class (CM5300 Advanced Transport Phenomena I, 3 credits, Spring, prereq=CM5100) or Polymer Rheology (CM4650, 3 credits), either of which will introduce you to the use of tensors in mathematical analysis.  After that I recommend taking our graduate math class (CM5100 Applied Mathematics for Chemical Engineers I, 3 credits, Fall) or any advanced mathematics course that interests you (some examples might be MA