Tag: Theses and Dissertations

New Theses and Dissertations Available in the Library

The Graduate School is pleased to announce the following programs have new theses and dissertations available in the J.R. Van Pelt and Opie Library:

  • Biological Sciences
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Civil Engineering
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Industrial Archaeology
  • Materials Science and Engineering
  • Mathematical Sciences
  • Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics
  • Rhetoric and Technical Communication

How to use a preflight profile

Preflight profiles in Adobe Acrobat® Pro can be used to check properties of a PDF document, as well as make some automatic fixes to them.  In this tutorial, we’ll show you how to use preflight profiles developed by the Graduate School to check the image quality in a PDF file.

To begin, download a preflight profile and save it to your computer. Depending on your browser settings, you might need to right click on the link to save the file to your computer as a *.kfp (or*.xml) file. The Graduate School has created the four below:

  1. Graduate School All Items will show you all items that have errors (red “x”) or should be examined (yellow exclamation point).  It includes checking page size (red “x”), embedded fonts (red “x”), type 3 fonts (red “x”), image quality (yellow exclamation point), and color images (only important if saving printing costs is a concern for you).  This is the same checker that the Graduate School uses.
  2. Graduate School Embedded Fonts will show you all of the fonts that aren’t embedded and where type 3 fonts are used.
  3. Graduate School Images will show you which images have a resolution below 300ppi.
  4. Graduate School Color Pages will show you which pages are in color.

First, you need to open the preflight tool.  In Adobe Acrobat® XI Pro, the preflight tool is located in the “Print Production” section of the “Tools.”

Thesis and Dissertation Seminars Scheduled

The Graduate School is pleased to announce two seminars to assist students with submitting and formatting their thesis or dissertation.

Submitting a thesis or dissertation

Students planning on finishing a thesis or dissertation spring or summer 2011 are invited a seminar designed to help students understand the submission process and answer questions about it.

Once you register, you will receive a confirmation with the location and a reminder of the date and time.

If you are unable to join us, a taped version of this seminar is available online from our May 18th presentation.

Formatting a thesis or dissertation

Beginning with defenses scheduled January 10, 2011 or later, new formatting requirements are in effect for theses and dissertations.  Students, faculty, and staff are invited to learn the highlights of these new requirements and have an opportunity to ask questions about the new requirements.

Once you register, you will receive a confirmation with the location and a reminder of the date and time.  Space is limited, so register early.

If you are unable to join us, this seminar will be taped and made available for viewing online.

Andrew Willemsen to represent Michigan Tech in MAGS competition

Andrew Willemsen
Andrew Willemsen, Michigan Tech’s representative for the 2011 MAGS Distinguished Thesis Award
The Graduate School is pleased to announce that Andrew Willemsen is Michigan Tech’s nominee for the 2011 Midwestern Association of Graduate Schools Distinguished Thesis Award.  Mr. Willemsen was nominated by his advisor, Dr. M. Rao of the Department of Mechanical Engineering – Engineering Mechanics.

His thesis, “Objective Metric for Assessing the Perceived Annoyance of Impulsive Sounds” developed a new method to objectively quantify the overall sound quality of electro-mechanical devices.  This method could improve the design process for these devices by replacing current subjective sound evaluation methods, which are typically expensive, time-consuming, and difficult to quantify.

Multi-Country Research Fellowship Program

Council of American Overseas Research Centers (CAORC)

This fellowship program supports advanced regional or trans-regional research. The program is open to United States doctoral candidates and scholars who have already earned their Ph.D. in fields in the humanities, social sciences, or allied natural sciences and wish to conduct research of regional or trans-regional significance. Fellowships require scholars to conduct research in more than one country, at least one of which hosts a participating American overseas research center.

Fellowship awards will not exceed $12,000 for doctoral candidates and post-doctoral scholars and $8,000 for master’s students.

Eligibility requirements apply at the time of application. Applicants must meet all of the following requirements and will be considered without regard to race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin and/or disability.

  • Must be a U.S. citizen. Proof of citizenship (photocopy of passport) must be shown upon award notification.
  • Must have a Ph.D., be a U.S. doctoral candidate who has completed all Ph.D. requirements with the exception of the dissertation, or be enrolled in a Master’s degree granting program.
  • Must be engaged in the study of and research in the humanities, social sciences, and allied natural sciences.
  • Must wish to conduct research of regional or trans-regional significance in two or more countries outside the United States, one of which must host a participating American overseas research center (ORC).

Fellowships require scholars to conduct research in more than one country, at least one of which hosts a participating American overseas research center. CAORC member centers to which fellows may affiliate include
– the American Academy in Rome,
– the American Center of Oriental Research (Amman, Jordan),
– the American Center for Mongolian Studies,
– the American Institute for Maghrib Studies (Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia),
– the American Institute for Sri Lankan Studies,
– the American Institute for Yemeni Studies,
– the American Institute of Afghanistan Studies,
– the American Institute of Bangladesh Studies,
– the American Institute of Indian Studies,
– the American Institute of Iranian Studies,
– the American Institute of Pakistan Studies,
– the American Research Center in Egypt,
– the American Research Center in Sofia,
– the American Research Institute in Turkey,
– the American School of Classical Studies at Athens,
– the Center for Khmer Studies,
– the Cyprus American Archaeological Research Institute,
– the Mexico-North Research Network,
– the Palestinian American Research Center,
– the American Academic Research Institute in Iraq,
– the West African Research Association (Senegal), and
– the W. F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research (Jerusalem).

How to edit a style

Styles apply a common set of formatting to a paragraph within Word.  In a previous post, we showed how to apply a style to a paragraph.  This tutorial will show two ways to edit an existing style.

First, edit the text as you desire.  In the example below, I have edited the text “Introduction” to be a different font (Adobe Garamond Pro Bold) and size (24 point) than the original Heading 1 style.  We can tell Heading 1 is applied to this text because it is outlined in orange in the Style section of the ribbon.

Edit the text to meet your specifications.

How to apply a style to a paragraph

Styles in Word are used to format text consistently throughout your document. Each paragraph may have a single style applied to it.  For each paragraph, styles define the:

  • Appearance of the text (bold, bulleted, size, font, etc.)
  • Behavior of the paragraph (does it stay with the next paragraph?  Have a page break before it?)
  • Structure of the document (is this a heading meant for the table of contents?)

Styles are found on the Home tab of Word, in the Styles section (boxed in the figure below).

The Styles section on the Home tab contains all of the built in styles available for use.