How do I have a project approved for senior design?

In order to have your project approved for senior design, you will need to complete a Petition to Request CM 4861 Design Substitution.  If your project is through the Enterprise program, then you will be petitioning the second semester course, ENT 4960, as a sub for CM 4861.

Your project must include:
1.  Appropriate engineering standards,
2.  Multiple realistic constraints, and
3.  Economic considerations.  Economic considerations typically include an economic analysis to discriminate between your design options.

The petition form and project abstract are due to the CM Advising Office by Friday of Week 4 of Fall semester.  You may drop the materials off in the CM Department Office to be put in the advisor’s mailbox.  The department’s lead design instructor and ABET committee will be reviewing all petitions on Monday of Week 5 for final approval.  If several students are working on the same project, you may submit one abstract for the team with your individual petitions attached.

See related:  How do I register for ENT 4950?


How do I register for ENT 4950?

The ENT 4950 and ENT 4960 courses are reserved for students who are using an Enterprise project for their senior design project.

You will be allowed to register for ENT 4950 during the regular fall registration period that opens in March.  You will need department permission from the advising office before enrolling and must have started in the Enterprise no later than spring of your junior year.  You will also need to have already completed or be concurrently enrolled in CM 4855 .  Subsequently, during early fall semester you will need to submit an abstract detailing your project to have your project approved for senior design.  You must complete both ENT 4950 and ENT 4960  for the project to qualify for the senior design substitution.

Both CM 4855 CM Process Analysis & Design I (fall) and CM 4860 CM Process Analysis & Design 2 (spring) are required for all chemical engineering students. For approved projects, one credit from ENT 4960 substitutes for CM 4861.  The additional three credits that you earn from ENT 4950 and ENT 4960 can be used towards your technical electives or free electives.  If your project is not approved at the abstract stage, then you will need to take CM 4861 CM Design Laboratory 2 in the spring semester.

To receive departmental permission complete the Google form Declaration of intent to complete alternative senior design project.  You will be notified via email when you’ve been given permission to enroll in ENT 4950.

See related:  How do I get a project approved for senior design?


Dow Chemical and MIT ACCESS program: Encouraging graduate study

This looks like a cool program; and we have an alum of this program in the Michigan Tech Chem Eng graduate program!  Spread the word.

Overview of program

The mission of the ACCESS program is to increase the diversity of qualified applicants to PHD programs in chemistry, chemical engineering and materials science throughout the United States. ACCESS is a weekend of educational and informative events that will introduce talented sophomores, juniors and seniors to the benefits of a graduate education in chemistry, chemical engineering, and materials science. The goal of ACCESS is not to prepare students for graduate school at MIT specifically, but rather to introduce them to the advantages of choosing a graduate career path at an institution that best meets each participant’s individual needs.

The weekend-long program offers students an overview of graduate education through seminars, faculty talks, and interactive sessions, all designed to give a greater understanding of the application process and an insight into the doors a graduate career can open.

ACCESS will give participants:

A broad exposure to the opportunities that can be gained from a graduate education in chemistry, chemical engineering, and materials science;

  • An introduction to the various career paths that can result from a graduate education in chemistry, chemical engineering, and materials science;
  • An opportunity to hear directly from faculty and students their reasons for choosing a graduate career;
  • An explanation of the funding structure for graduate education and information on graduate fellowships;
  • A chance to meet and socialize with fellow undergraduates from around the nation who are pursuing similar goals;
  • And a fun Cambridge/Boston experience!

Contact Info:

For more information about the ACCESS program, email mit-access@mit.edu.


How can I prepare for registration?

Registration is always right around the corner, and before it arrives, it’s best to get prepared. Those of you who have tried to make an appointment with Katie near registration time know that her schedule fills up. She has “walk-in” office hours weeks 9-11, so you will not need an appointment, but you may face some lines. With this post I reach out to you with some advice to ensure that you have a good registration season.

Katie’s walk-in office hours schedule is posted here: blogs.mtu.edu/chem-eng-undergrad/

If you are uncertain what classes you need to take, please take a look at our video on Planning your Schedule.

Planning your schedule begins with the planning handout at this link (http://www.chem.mtu.edu/~fmorriso/advising/2015MoreAdvisingInfoHandout4SemPlanFAM.pdf), which shows a 4-year plan of how the Chemical Engineering curriculum maps out. I have indicated the classes that cause a bottleneck–these are the classes that are only offered one time per year. Up until the spring of junior year you have flexibility in when you can take classes. The three spring junior classes, however, (transport 2, kinetics, controls) are only offered in the spring. The senior chemical engineering classes (unit and plant operations, plant design, safety and the environment) are only offered once per year as well. This means that you need to be ready for those spring junior classes during the spring that you plan to take them.

The pre-requisites for our classes are summarized on this handout:  www.mtu.edu/chemical/undergraduate/advising/pdfs/prerequisite-map.pdf

To plan out your schedule you should map out which semester you intend to take the fixed classes (spring junior classes, senior classes) and then back-calculate when you will take the pre-requisites for those courses.

On the planning handout I have also indicated when classes are offered on-line, and I’ve highlighted some General Education (GenEd) rules that you should be mindful of as you plan out your GenEd choices.

Finally, once things get close to graduation, every requirement must be met and this can get confusing sometimes. For checking or auditing your compliance with your degree requirements Michigan Tech uses DARS: Degree Audit Reporting System. Go to your Banweb account, log in, and look for Degree audit. You can run your own degree audit. It takes a minute or two for the computer to slot all your courses into the various bins or “buckets” where they satisfy requirements. When it’s finished, you can take a look. Green is good; red is bad. You will see all kinds of lists and requirements that are checked. It is a computer program and online, so hopefully you can poke around a bit and figure out how it’s working. If you are a transfer student or if you transferred in courses, it is very helpful for sorting out what credits count for what.

Please take a look at your DARS and see how your credits earned are stacking up towards getting your CM degree. If you look over the attached sheet, consult the pre-req map, look at your degree audit, and make use of the handouts for minors and technical electives that are on the Advising web page, you will see that registration is a snap.

Thanks for your patience during registration season. We will endeavor to answer all your questions and hopefully we can find a solution that will lead to a smooth path towards your BS in chemical engineering.

More helpful links:

best wishes,

Dr. Morrison


How do I run a degree audit for my catalog year, not the most current?

When you run your degree audit on Banweb you will see a screen that says “Select Degree Program”.  Keep the default selection of “Latest” to run your degree audit with the correct catalog year.

If you select a major from the drop-down list then this will run what is called a “What-if Audit”.  The what-if audits are for students who are considering changing majors and always run with the most current catalog year.



What does a “Linked Course Required” error mean?

There are a number of classes that have multiple parts (a lecture, recitation, and/or lab), and you must enroll in all of the parts to register for the class.  If you only register for one part you will get a registration error that says “Linked Course Required”.  If you look at the section column when you search for classes (labeled “Sec”), the lecture sections are lettered (0A, 0B, etc.), the recitation sections start with an R (R01, R02, etc.), and the lab sections start with an L (L01, L02, etc.).  All of the parts of a single course will have the same course number.

For example to enroll in CM 3215, Transport Lab, you must register for both the lecture and lab portions:

CM 3215 0A (lecture)

CM 3215 L01 or L02 or etc. (lab)

Classes with multiple parts include:  MA 1160, MA 1161, MA 2160, MA 3160, CM 3215, CM 3310, CM 4110, CM 4120, and CM 4855.

Some classes instead require a “co-requisite”.  This means that you must sign up for both classes (different course numbers) or you will get a “Linked Course Required” error.  Classes that require co-requisites include:  CH 1150/CH 1151, CH 1160/CH 1161, and MA 2321/MA 3521.


Are the rules for minors changing?

In Fall 2016, the rules for all minors will be changing. Students will be able to double count all minor classes with major classes (no more “6 credits must not double count, etc. etc.), but you will no longer be able to use the same classes for multiple minors.  Some departments may choose to change the courses required for their  minor because of these rule changes.

If you are planning to pursue a minor in any department then it is very important that you add the minor *this* year. Students who have added a minor by the end of this year will be able to use the existing rules.

We will be allowed to move you to the newer rules if the new rules benefit you, but after next fall we will *not* be allowed to move you back to the older rules.


What is my catalog year?

You can find your catalog term in the upper right-hand corner of your online degree audit, on Banweb.  The catalog year runs from fall through summer.  So the 2015-16 catalog year includes Fall 2015, Spring 2016, and Summer 2016.  The first four digits of your catalog term is the year, and the last two digits is the month that the term starts.  If your catalog term says “201508” (which is Fall 2015), “201601” (which is Spring 2016), or “201605” (which is Summer 2016) then you are on the 2015-16 catalog year.

Degree requirements are organized by catalog year or catalog term.  Degree requirements can change from year to year as the curriculum is improved, so it is important that you know what your catalog year is and what the requirements are for your catalog year.  This is why your requirements (for example:  general education rules or technical electives) may be different than students that started in a different year than you.

In most cases your catalog year is the year in which you started at Michigan Tech.  Sometimes when you change majors you are put in the most current catalog year.  If you are changing majors into chemical engineering we usually keep you on the same catalog year as when you started at Michigan Tech.  However, you may move to a newer catalog year if the newer requirements fit in better with your planned classes.  You may not move to an older catalog year that was in place before you started at Michigan Tech.  If you leave the university for longer than a year and then return to complete your degree, you will be placed on the most current catalog year.

If you are pursuing a minor, the catalog year for the minor may be different than the catalog year for your major.


What classes can I take for the HUFA and SBS gen ed requirements?

The HUFA and SBS gen ed requirements are only a part of the 201308 and 201408 catalog years.  The following lists are courses that are approved for the HUFA and SBS requirements.

IMPORTANT:  The courses listed below that say “added Fall 2015” do not automatically pull into the HUFA or SBS spots on your online degree audit.  Please contact your advisor to have this corrected.

Humanities and Fine Arts (HUFA) Electives:

  • FA 2330 Art Appreciation
  • FA 2520 Music Appreciation
  • FA 2720 Audio Arts Appreciation (added Fall 2015)
  • FA 2820 Theater Appreciation
  • HU 2130 Introduction to Rhetoric
  • HU 2501 American Experience in Literature (course discontinued in Spring 2015)
  • HU 2503 Literature Survey A (added Fall 2015)
  • HU 2504 Literature Survey B (added Fall 2015)
  • HU 2538 British Experience in Literature
  • HU 2700 Introduction to Philosophy
  • HU 2820 Communication and Culture
  • HU 2910 Language and Mind
  • SS 2300 Environment and Society (added Fall 2015)

 

Social and Behavioral Science (SBS) Electives:

  • EC 2001 Principles of Economics
  • PSY 2000 Principles of Psychology
  • SS 2100 World Peoples and Environments
  • SS 2200 Introduction to Archaeology
  • SS 2400 Introduction to Human Geography
  • SS 2500 United States History to 1871
  • SS 2501 United States History Since 1877
  • SS 2502 European History to 1650
  • SS 2503 European History Since 1650
  • SS 2504 World History to 1500
  • SS 2505 World History Since 1500
  • SS 2600 American Government and Politics
  • SS 2610 Introduction to Law and Society (added Fall 2015)
  • SS 2700 Introduction to Sociology