Michigan Tech Showcases New Professional Master of Engineering Program

Automotive engineering is entering a new era of hybrid electric-drive vehicles that demand a special set of skills most automotive engineers didn’t study when they went to college. To prepare engineers to thrive in this hybrid/electric world, Michigan Technological University is developing an interdisciplinary professional Master of Engineering program with graduate and undergraduate certification in propulsion technologies for hybrid and electric vehicles.

This curriculum development is supported by a three-year, $3 million grant from the Department of Energy under the Transportation Electrification Program.  Michigan Tech will preview the new professional master’s program at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit Jan. 11-24.

The Michigan Tech exhibit is part of the Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC) EcoXperience Showcase at the Auto Show this year.  Michigan Tech’s booth will feature information about the new hybrid/electric graduate program.

“We were invited because we are leading the way in professional education in hybrid electric vehicles and battery technologies,” said Carl L. Anderson, associate dean for research and graduate programs in Michigan Tech’sCollege of Engineering. Anderson and Michigan Tech engineering faculty Jeff Naber and Wayne Weaver are heading the development of the new graduate curriculum.

The exhibit will be in the MEDC Alternative Energy Showcase on the lower level of the Cobo Center in downtown Detroit, home to the annual Auto Show. EcoXperience will feature a quarter-mile indoor ride-and-drive test track surrounded by landscaped and forested terrain.  MEDC is expecting at least 50,000 of the Auto Show’s 650,000 visitors to see EcoXperience.

Representatives from Michigan Tech’s College of Engineering and Michigan Tech alumni who work at General Motors will staff the exhibit to answer questions about the University’s new professional Master of Engineering curriculum.

The pioneering professional master’s curriculum is being developed in partnership with AVL and GM.

For the past two semesters, Naber and colleagues have collaborated with the Engineering Society of Detroit, the Michigan Academy for Green Mobility and Michigan Tech’s industry partners to offer a pilot course for automotive engineers in the Detroit area. This course, including distance instruction and hands-on labs, attracted 100 graduate students each time it was taught

A fully outfitted mobile lab for the new curriculum is being built at Michigan Tech’s Keweenaw Research Center, and the University’s Husky Game Development Enterprise is developing computer software for student simulations in the lab.   The mobile lab will also be used in outreach programs, including the US Department of Education’s GEAR UP (Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs) at Michigan Tech and the University’s Youth Programs, which bring hands-on engineering and science experiences to more than 1,000 middle and high-school students each year.

Youth Programs and Admissions representatives will be at the Michigan Tech booth on Automotive Education day, which is Jan. 20.

A press preview is scheduled for Jan. 11-12, followed by an industry preview Jan. 13-14. The Auto Show will open to the public at 9 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 16 and close at 7 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 24.


Michigan Tech Showcases New Professional Master of Engineering Program

Automotive engineering is entering a new era of hybrid electric-drive vehicles that demand a special set of skills. To prepare engineers to thrive in this hybrid/electric world, Michigan Technological University is developing an interdisciplinary professional Master of Engineering program.

New Professional Master’s Program Emphasizing Hybrid Vehicle Engineering

View the full article


Entrepreneurship: the Successful Share Their Secrets

by Marcia Goodrich, senior writer

Dave House ’65 opened Thursday’s Entrepreneurship and Technology Symposium with a parable drawn from real life.

About 50 years after Leland Stanford built a small, coeducational college in the Valley of Heart’s Delight, there were a couple of young graduates who wanted to stay in the community, but unfortunately, all the good jobs were elsewhere. Their professor encouraged them to start their own company nearby and capitalize on the resources of the school. So William Hewlett and David Packard started a little electronics business in their garage, beginning the transformation of the agrarian Valley of Heart’s Delight into Silicon Valley, with Stanford University at its core.

Continue reading



Can Snowmobiles Adapt in the Age of Ethanol?

For the owners of the 1.7 million snow machines registered in the US, it’s a serious question. Scott Miers will begin to answer it this winter. He will test snowmobile emissions and fuel economy on E15 fuel, both in the lab and on the trail. He will also study how well snowmobiles start at low temperatures on the higher-ethanol blend. “If you can’t start in the cold, you can’t snowmobile,” Miers noted.

View the full story


Michigan Tech Trains Automotive Engineers for Hybrid Technologies

Hybrid technology is a primary path for the auto industry to improve fuel economy for its vehicles, but it’s not something most automotive engineers learned in school.  Michigan Technological University and industry partners are working to fix that by bringing the latest advanced propulsion and battery technology know-how to the engineers in the heartland of the auto industry—Detroit.

With vehicles donated by GM, Michigan Tech has teamed up with the Engineering Society of Detroit (ESD) and industry leaders including AVL to offer the graduate-level course in Detroit.  Classes and modeling studies along with hands-on labs are being taught at various facilities, including the Michigan Tech Research Institute in Ann Arbor and AVL in Plymouth.

This is the second semester that Michigan Tech, ESD and industrial partners have offered the three-credit graduate course. The first course targeted approximately 60 out-of-work automotive engineers in partnership with GM. The second session has just wrapped up, and a third session will start in January 2010. The second and third courses are offered through a partnership with the Michigan Academy of Green Mobility (MAGM) and target  engineers employed in the auto or transportation industry who are seeking to upgrade their skills.

Approximately 100 engineers completed the fall course, and another 100 are expected to take the spring 2010 session. Tuition is paid in part through the MAGM, in partnership with the Michigan Department of Energy, Labor and Economic Growth through the Michigan Green Jobs Program.

Lead instructor is Jeff Naber, associate professor of mechanical engineering-engineering mechanics and director of the Advanced Power Systems Research Center at Michigan Tech.  Other faculty include Jeff Allen, John Beard, Jeff Burl, Steve Hackney, Wayne Weaver and Jeremy Worm, all from Michigan Tech.

Students praise the course.  “It combines theory with practical, real-world automotive knowledge, enabling engineers to significantly advance their skills in these critical areas,” said Timothy Philippart, a staff engineer with GM.

“The course combines many hybrid vehicle engineering concepts to provide us with a working-level comprehensive overview that helps us effectively build on our everyday jobs,” observed Christina Cramer, another GM engineer.


Tech Trains Automotive Engineers for Hybrid Technologies

Hybrid technology is a primary path for the auto industry to improve fuel economy in its vehicles, but it’s not something most automotive engineers learned in school. Michigan Tech and industry partners are working to fix that by bringing the latest advanced propulsion and battery technology know-how to the engineers in the heartland of the auto industry–Detroit. With vehicles donated by GM, Tech has teamed up with the Engineering Society of Detroit and industry leaders, including AVL, to offer the graduate-level course in Detroit.
Interview of Dr. Terry Woychowski on CDTV.net on Youtube
Interview of Dr. Tim Schulz on CDTV.net on Youtube
New Professional Master’s Program Emphasizing Hybrid Vehicle Engineering

View the full article


Pulling Their Way for Others

The team of Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics seniors at Michigan Tech developed a Human-Powered Off-Road Wheelchair prototype that was created through the mechanical engineering senior capstone course. The 8-speed vehicle is easy to maneuver by pulling back on the handlebars and can reach speeds up to 4 mph, roughly equal to a slow jog, although the speeds are “user dependent.”

View the full article


Mining History Comes to Life at Commencement

In 1932, a distinguished Michigan mining engineer named Scott Turner received an honorary doctorate in engineering from Michigan Tech, at that time called the Michigan College of Mining and Technology. At Michigan Tech’s midyear Commencement on Dec. 12–77 years later–one of the first recipients of the University’s PhD in industrial heritage and archeology will wear Turner’s historic academic hood to accept his degree.

View the full article