Category: CTL

October

The William G. Jackson Center for Teaching and Learning schedules events for faculty and instructional staff to provide opportunities to learn new instructional strategies and tools and meet colleagues from other departments.

Coffee Chat -The Future of iClickers (10/1): Student response systems continue to evolve, and many (including iClicker) are moving toward replacing dedicated devices with phone or tablet apps. These apps offer new tools for instructors and students and potentially lower costs, but reliability and the potential distraction caused by the device is of concern to many.  In this session, we’ll discuss the changes iClicker is making and look at some app-based products that have already been piloted on campus.  Our goal: gather input about whether/when a change in (or addition to?)  the campus standard is appropriate.  All clicker-using instructors are encouraged to attend! Coffee and light refreshments will be provided to those who register by Wednesday,  September 30.  Join us for this event on Thursday, October 1 from 3:30 to 4:30pmClick here to register.

Lunch and Learn — Jackson Blended Learning Grant Showcase (10/13): In January 2015, through a generous gift from William G. Jackson, the CTL awarded $1000, $5000 and $10,000 grants to teams of instructors for blended learning projects at Michigan Tech. This luncheon will showcase these grant projects, which include ways to share and organize blended learning content items,  flipped-classrooms, and even a  new online course. Participants will be invited to explore the work funded by these grants prior to the luncheon and then select facilitators for further conversation.  The goal is to encourage participants to use blended techniques in their classes. Lunch will be provided to those who register by Friday, October 9. Join us for this event on Tuesday, October 13 from noon to 1:00pmClick here to register.

Pedagogical Workshop  Fostering Productive Group Dynamics in Instruction (10/20): Due to the positive response of the CTL’s 2013 Great Groups Lunch and Learn event, the CTL collaborated with Sonia Goltz and Roger Woods from the School of Business and Economics to develop and deliver this workshop for Michigan Tech instructors and staff. This workshop is ideal for those who support students in team projects—in courses or other contexts. Workshop participants will learn about group development and explore strategies for setting expectations and holding team members accountable. Note: To make the most of this workshop experience, you will be asked to complete a video and quiz pre-assignment in Canvas before attending this workshop.  Join us for this event on Tuesday, October 20 from 1:30pm to 3:00pmClick here to register.

Coffee Chat  University Goal 3: Global Literacy (10/22): 

Join the Global Literacy Goal Committee for a Q&A on the goal#3 rubric, discuss alternative pathways to global literacy, and talk about issues & opportunities for introducing global literacy in your program curriculum. While the primary audience is degree program curriculum committee members, anyone interested in the topic is welcome to join the discussion.Hosted by the goal committee for University Student Learning Goal 3: Global Literacy. Coffee and light refreshments will be provided to those who register by Wednesday,  October 21.  Join us for this event on Thursday, October 22 from 3:30 to 4:30pmClick here to register.


September

The William G. Jackson Center for Teaching and Learning schedules events for faculty and instructional staff to provide opportunities to learn new instructional strategies and tools and meet colleagues from other departments. 

Coffee Chat — Barbara Oakley — Looking Back on MOOC Development: Challenges and Opportunities (9/3): Dr. Barbara Oakley (author of “A Mind for Numbers”) returns to Michigan Tech this fall after successfully delivering a free Massive Open Online Course (MOOC), titled “Learning How to Learn,” through Coursera to nearly a million students.  During this chat, Michigan Tech instructors will gain insight into her experience developing and delivering this MOOC as well as discuss metacognitive techniques all instructors can teach their students. (This event is partially sponsored by the Visiting Women & Minority Lecturer/Scholar Series (VWMLS), which is funded by a grant to the Michigan Tech Office of Institutional Equity, from the State of Michigan’s King-Chavez-Parks Initiative.) Coffee and light refreshments will be provided to those who register by Monday, August 31.  Join us for this event on Thursday, September 3 from 2:00 to 3:30pmClick here to register.

Coffee Chat — Faculty Learning Communities: An Effective Change Agent? (9/10): In this coffee chat, we’ll explore the nature, intent, and structure of a Faculty Learning Community (FLC) and explore the process of starting one here at Michigan Tech. To prepare for this discussion, participants will be asked to read two short articles by Milton Cox, who has used FLCs for over 20 years at Miami University as a way for faculty to learn about and become campus leaders on a wide variety of topics. His recent research demonstrates that FLCs are among the most effective ways to introduce and retain evidence-based instructional methods across campuses. Coffee and light refreshments will be provided to those who register by Friday, September 4.  Join us for this event on Thursday, September 10 from 3:30 to 4:30pmClick here to register.

Lunch and Learn — Metacognitive Strategies (9/16): As information becomes increasingly accessible, higher education is challenged to be more intentional in helping students hone strategies for learning. The explicit teaching of metacognitive strategies, which encourage students to examine their own thinking and approaches to learning different types of content, can improve retention and motivation. In this session we’ll examine and practice several metacognitive teaching skills, with an eye toward integrating them across virtually any discipline. Participants will be asked to read a short article in preparation for this workshop. Lunch will be provided to those who register by Friday, September 11. Join us for this event on Wednesday, September 16 from noon to 1:00pmClick here to register.


April

Global Literacy Learning Goal Luncheon – April 8

During the next academic year, Michigan Tech will focus on assessing and improving the way Global Literacy (learning goal #3) is taught, both in general education and across all disciplines. This event is designed to get faculty ready. Participants will be asked to do some preparation about one week before this event. The goal committee will then lead discussions on assessment criteria, sample assignments and other ideas to weave Global Literacy skills into any program. Sign up here.

Plagiarism Education Week 2015

Turnitin’s 2015 Plagiarism Education Week conference, Copy/Paste/Culture, examines how current global trends are affecting our values, especially those related to education, and proposes strategies on how we can address these challenges. The Office of Academic and Community Conduct is partnering with the Center for Teaching & Learning to host 45-minute webcasts devoted to sharing ideas and best practices with educators and students about plagiarism and academic integrity. Premier thought leaders will include educational experts, passionate educators and Turnitin All-Stars, all of whom will share their perspectives, lessons, and research. These webcasts will be recorded and a link will be made available at a later date. All faculty, staff and students are invited to attend! For more information please contact Rob Bishop via email (rmbishop@mtu.edu) or phone (487-1964).

Monday, April 20, 2015 at 1 pm, Admin Bldg – Room 404
Changing Culture to Promote Integrity: Why Progress Is Possible
David Callahan, author of The Cheating Culture: Why More Americans Are Doing Wrong to Get Ahead

Monday, April 20, 2015 at 4 pm, Admin Bldg – Room 404
A Student-Centered Culture: Promoting Integrity One Conversation at a Time
Michael Goodwin, Academic Integrity Coordinator at Kennesaw State University

Tuesday, April 21, 2015 at 1 pm, Admin Bldg – Room 404
Narcissism and Extrinsic Values: Understanding Student Trends that Impact Plagiarism and Cheating
Jean Twenge, author of The Narcissism Epidemic: Living in the Age of Entitlement

Tuesday, April 21, 2015 at 4 pm,, Admin Bldg – Room 404
Wikipedia in the Classroom: Authority, Trust, and Information Literacy
LiAnna Davis, Director of Programs at Wiki Education Foundation

Wednesday, April 22, 2015 at 1 pm,  MUB – Alumni Lounge
Improvisation and Plagiarism: Fostering a Culture of Creativity
Teresa Fishman, Director of the International Center for Academic Integrity (ICAI)

Wednesday, April 22, 2015 at 1 pm,  MUB – Alumni Lounge
The Cultural Implications of Contract Cheating
Tricia Bertram Gallant, Director of Academic Integrity at UC San Diego

Thursday, April 21, 2015 at 1 pm,, Admin Bldg – Room 404
Decisions on Deadline: A 21st Century Gaming Approach to Teach Plagiarism and Ethics
Samantha Grant and Brittney Shepherd, co-producers of A Fragile Trust


Dean’s Teaching Showcase: Mari Buche

by Mike Meyer, director, William G. Jackson CTL

The Dean’s Teaching Showcase nominee for this week comes from the School of Business and Economics. Dean Gene Klippel has chosen to recognize Mari Buche, associate professor of management information sciences and the graduate program director for the MS in Data Science.

Dean Klippel simply made a list of what he looks for in a faculty member as it relates to teaching excellence, and then found in Buche a faculty member that embodied the entire list. Klippel’s characteristics include exceptional disciplinary knowledge and skill maintenance through professional development activities as well as a passion for the discipline. Mari demonstrates these through membership and extensive speaking, participation and mentoring in three professional societies—ACM, America’s Conference on Information Systems and the Midwest Association of Information Systems. Klippel also noted exceptional verbal communication skills as something Buche brings to all of her interactions through the School.

But Dean Klippel also looks for some “softer” traits, including genuine caring about the success of students and a willingness to listen to student feedback regarding course materials and structure. He noted that Mari goes beyond the classroom to support the success of students and brings alumni back as guest speakers. Mari’s previous recognition as the 2014 Outstanding Faculty Greek Life Award through the Order of Omega and as a “Props for Profs winner through the Jackson CTL in spring 2014 shows a strong student connection as well.

Mari will be formally recognized with the 11 other Dean’s Teaching Showcase nominees at a luncheon near the end of spring term. Please join Dean Klippel and the Jackson Center for Teaching and Learning in thanking Mari for her outstanding contributions to the teaching mission of the School of Business and Economics.


Dean’s Teaching Showcase: Scott Kuhl

by Mike Meyer, director, William G. Jackson CTL

The Dean’s Teaching Showcase nominee for this week comes from the College of Sciences and Arts. Dean Bruce Seely has chosen to recognize Scott Kuhl, an assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science with an adjunct appointment in Cognitive and Learning Sciences. Dean Seely values “what Scott Kuhl attempts to accomplish as a teacher mainly for the mindset he employs, and less for the specific teaching techniques has adopted.” He notes that Scott “does not differentiate between regular classes, summer youth and support for Enterprise activities as educational venues—but approaches all with the goal of creating a fun and motivating environment.”

In his more traditional courses, Scott does attribute his teaching success to specific techniques, like providing detailed assignment descriptions with numerous tips to “help get students going in the right direction.” He also provides numerous examples, some of which he walks through in class in detail, and encourages students to share additional examples with each other. Finally, he emphasizes prompt feedback for his students. He has accomplished this by creating an automatic grading program which provides a “provides a transparent, well-defined set of expectations for assignments” and a score that can be adjusted by an instructor or grader as necessary. He’s even willing to share this tool with those interested.

Kuhl is also focused on continual improvement. Though the Husky Game Development  (HGD) Enterprise he leads is focused on games, he attributes its dramatic growth under his leadership to a careful cycle of feedback, change and evaluation. He sees the value of interdisciplinary teamwork, communication, development and management for students in HGD, and has led the group in both publishing academic papers and receiving sponsorship from both Chrysler and the Department of Labor.

Scott will be formally recognized with the 11 other Dean’s Teaching Showcase nominees at a luncheon near the end of spring term. Please join Dean Seely, computer science chair Min Song and the Jackson Center for Teaching and Learning in thanking Scott for his outstanding contributions to the teaching mission of the College of Sciences and Arts.


February

The William G. Jackson Center for Teaching and Learning schedules events for faculty and instructional staff to provide opportunities to learn new instructional strategies and tools and meet faculty from other departments. 

Balancing Work and Life: Great Teaching and Time for You (2/26): New methods of teaching allow communication with students from virtually any place at any time.  How do you find a balance that meets student needs but leaves time for family and personal needs?   The Michigan Tech Work-Life Advisory Committee and the William G. Jackson Center for Teaching and Learning co-hosts this coffee chat in which we’ll explore tips and techniques for balancing the many demands on today’s instructors.  We’ll also brainstorm ways the committee can advocate for the flexibility and resources to keep instructor roles balanced. This coffee chat event is scheduled for Thursday, February 26 from 3:30-4:30 p.m. Coffee and light refreshments will be provided to those who register by Monday, February 23. Click here to register.


Jackson Grant Recipients Announced

Due to a generous gift from William G. Jackson, the William G. Jackson Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) is pleased to announce the 2015 grant recipients.  Nearly $55,000 in grants were awarded to instructors and teams of instructors at $1000, $5000, and $10000 levels. These grants will support course/program reform or expansion projects using blended and online learning.
This year’s solicitation placed special emphasis on mentoring of instructors new to blended learning, interdisciplinary collaboration, shared content, matching support, testing, and assessment. A committee, assembled by the Provost and the CTL Director, reviewed many compelling grant proposals in order to select this year’s grant recipients:

$10,000 Level

  • Composition in Digital Environments ($9,846) — Lauren Bowen, Humanities
  • “Flipping KIP”: A Blended Learning Approach for Kinesiology Laboratories ($7,567) — Steven Elmer, Kinesiology and Integrative Physiology
  • Extension of Blended Learning across the Calculus Sequence — Todd King, Mathematical Sciences
  • Global Issues Blended Learning Initiative — Jonathan Robins, Social Sciences

$5,000 Level

  • Integrative Statistics for Social, Behavioral, and Biological Sciences Using Blended Learning ($3,000) — Susan Amato-Henderson, Cognitive and Learning Sciences
  • Development of Blended Learning Course for more Flexible, Online Course Options and Community College ($3,000) — Tara Bal, School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science
  • Shared, Organized Resources for Teaching (SORT) — Amy Hamlin, Engineering Fundamentals
  • Blended and Active Learning for Health Sciences at Michigan Tech — Brigitte Morin, Biological Sciences

$1,000 Level

  • “Starting from Scratch”: Chemical Engineering Laboratory Exercises for \Online Courses — Tim Eisele, Chemical Engineering
  • Creating Interactive E-Reading Assignments for Blended Learning — Chunming Gao, School of Technology
  • Computational Science Models — Ben Ong, Mathematics

Jackson Grant recipients will be working on their projects through spring and summer of 2015, with changes ready for implementation and presentation in the fall.


Dean’s Teaching Showcase: Gordon Parker

The Dean’s Teaching Showcase nominee for this week comes from the College of Engineering. Dean Wayne Pennington has chosen to recognize Gordon Parker, the John and Cathi Drake Professor in the Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics Department. Both Pennington and MEEM chair Bill Predebon praised Parker as “a great success story of the flipped classroom approach.” Gordon has effectively implemented the flipped classroom model in both a senior level and graduate level controls course, and now has more than 30 video clips that are being used world-wide.

Parker attributes his success to his ability to “borrow techniques from my colleagues, add some of my own ideas, mix them into my teaching style and serve them up to willing students.” He acknowledges that some of his innovations didn’t work, but believes teaching innovation is “encouraged by the Tech culture.” He especially appreciates regular faculty presentations on teaching methods sponsored by the MEEM department, as well as “random conversations in the elevator” which help him improve his teaching.

He has found the flipped classroom to be most effective because it lets him “use class time to exercise what students have prepared in advance.” This allows high expectations and accountability, but seems to work well for most students. Parker enjoys the real-time feedback of the more interactive classroom, and finds the higher level of spontaneity exciting, since “every class is different.”

Parker is also credits his department for working on a new undergraduate curriculum, which is “requiring a high level of communication and coordination between numerous instructors” and is “nothing like my previous experiences of developing courses in my closed-door office.” He appreciates the challenges and imperfections in both teaching and joint curricular changes, but believes the changes are “well worth it.”

Gordon will be formally recognized with the 11 other Dean’s Teaching Showcase nominees at a luncheon near the end of spring term. Please join Dean Pennington, Chair Predebon and the Jackson Center for Teaching and Learning in thanking Gordon for his outstanding contributions to the teaching mission of the College of Engineering.


Introducting the Dean’s Teaching Showcase

by Mike Meyer, director, William G. Jackson CTL

During each spring semester, the William G. Jackson Center for Teaching and Learning works to recognize and reward great teaching that takes place on campus. Last spring, both our Props for Profs and Creative Canvas Course Competition highlighted excellent instruction brought forward by students. Student course evaluations also drive nominations to the Academy of Teaching Excellence and the Distinguished Teaching awards.

This spring, the Jackson Center will work to highlight important contributions to teaching that aren’t noticed—or sometimes appreciated by—students. Many instructors spend hours revising curricula, creating new courses and programs, assessing student work, meeting accreditation requirements or even completing instruction that’s foundational but goes unappreciated until well beyond graduation. To accomplish this, I’ve asked the five academic Deans—Frendewey, Klippel, Pennington, Seely, and Sharik—to take turns recognizing someone each week within their organization doing this kind of teaching work.

The nominees—12 altogether—will have their contributions highlighted in Tech Today each Friday and be invited to an end-of-term luncheon. Our hope is to make these valuable contributions to Michigan Tech’s teaching mission more visible. If you know someone worthy of the Showcase, be sure to tell the appropriate Dean, or let us know at the Center at ctl@mtu.edu or 7-3000.

Our first nominee, next week, will come from the College of Engineering.