Author: Sue Hill

Sue Hill is the Digital Content Manager for the College of Engineering.

Chad Deering Nominated for Michigan Tech Distinguished Teaching Award

Chad Deering
Chad Deering

The William G. Jackson Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) is seeking input for its annual Distinguished Teaching Awards, which recognize outstanding contributions to Michigan Tech’s instructional mission. Based on more than 40,000 student ratings of instruction responses, 10 finalists have been identified for the 2023 awards. The selection committee is soliciting comments from students, staff, faculty and alumni to be referenced during their deliberations.

Among the Associate Professor/Professor finalists is Chad Deering, who is an associate professor in the Department of Geological and Mining Engineering and Sciences.

Comments for the finalists are due by March 31 and can be submitted online.

The process for determining the Distinguished Teaching Award recipients from this list of finalists also involves the additional surveying of their spring 2023 classes. The selection committee makes the final determination of the award recipients. The 2023 Distinguished Teaching Awards will be formally announced in May.

For more information, contact the CTL at ctl@mtu.edu or 906-487-3000.

Bay College and Michigan Tech Offer Mine Safety Annual Training

Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) refresher training is offered by Bay College and Michigan Technological University.

This 8-hour program covers the annual training requirements under 30 CFR parts 46 & 48.

Attendees must be “experienced miners” and have completed their 24-hour New Miner training.

Location: Escanaba at Bay College, Joseph Heirman University Center, room 908J.

Dates: Choose one of Wednesday, February 15, Thursday, February 16, or Friday, February 17.

Time: 8 a.m.–5 p.m. ET

Cost: $70 includes lunch

To register or view all offerings, visit mytraining.baycollege.edu.

For questions, workforcetraining@baycollege.edu.

Brittany Buschell Receives the Above and Beyond Making a Difference Award

Brittany Buschell
Brittany Buschell

Our heartfelt congratulations to Brittany Buschell, the GMES department coordinator, on receiving the 2022 Above and Beyond Making a Difference Award!

Brittany, who joined GMES in 2014, goes above and beyond her duties as coordinator. She is incredibly creative and very skilled in artistic endeavors. She quietly applies these skills to her work in GMES as the unofficial department photographer and as a media creator. Any time that a picture of someone is needed, Brittany is there with her camera and the perfect flash for the event time and place. The pictures that are presented always look great—many of the faculty photos on our faculty webpage were taken by her!

With her love of rocks, Brittany fits right in at the geological and mining department. Several times each year she organizes Yooperlite hunting trips with our students. She grabs a bucket, her UV flashlight, and groups of brave students to walk the shores of Lake Superior at night collecting the Yooperlites. She even puts together gift bags to give out to donors, visitors, or prospective students. Each bag contains a Yooperlite and a card (that she designed of course) explaining Yooperlites. It can take a few hours to collect just a couple of Yooperlites, so you can imagine the time Brittany spends looking for these during the months without snow!

Brittany constantly goes above and beyond to create a comfortable, safe, enriching environment for our faculty, staff, and most importantly, our students. The GMES community is thankful for the positive difference she makes, and we congratulate her on this well-deserved recognition!

Simon Carn on the Tonga Eruption

Simon Carn (GMES) was a guest on a BBC Science In Action podcast episode on January 5, 2023, titled “One year on from the Tonga eruption.”

The episode discussed what made the January 2022 eruption of the Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai volcano so powerful and unpacked its long-lasting impacts.

“Amongst all the material ejected by Hunga Tonga was a huge amount of water. The massive water vapour cloud is still present in our atmosphere, as Professor Simon Carn from the Michigan Technological University tells us.”

BBC Science in Action

Simon Carn on the Mauna Loa Volcano Eruption

Great @planet imagery from December 1 showing #MaunaLoa #lava flows crossing the road to the @NOAA_ESRL Mauna Loa Observatory (home of the @Keeling_curve), and the active Fissure 3 with its gas plume and shadow. At this time the active flow front was ~5 km from the Saddle Road. For more posts like this, follow Prof. Simon Carn on Twitter, @simoncarn.

The world’s largest active volcano—Hawaii’s Mauna Loa—has been quiet for the past four decades. But in November 2022, the volcano began to stir.

Some cloud cover on November 28 scattered light from the eruption and urban areas and made it more diffuse. “It also looks like the lava emitted by the eruption was so bright that the sensor was saturated, producing a ‘post-saturation recovery streak’ along the VIIRS scan to the southeast,” noted Simon Carn, a volcanologist at Michigan Tech. “These streaks are only seen over very intense sources of visible radiation.”

“The eruption is effusive rather than explosive, although its initial phase overnight on November 28 was quite energetic and injected some sulfur dioxide to high altitudes, possibly all the way to the tropopause,” said Carn. “That is unusual for this type of eruption.”

Read more at NASA Earth Observatory, or follow Simon Carn on Twitter, @simoncarn.

Related

Erika Vye Presents on Geoheritage Education in the Keweenaw

Erika Vye (GLRC/GMES) delivered an invited presentation (virtually) titled “Place, Partnerships, and Practice – Geoheritage Education Initiatives in Michigan’s Keweenaw Region” during the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America (GS), held October 9–12, 2022.

Vye and co-author Bill Rose (GMES) were invited to present as part of a Pardee Keynote Symposia titled “Geoheritage: Connecting Our Stories to Earth’s History.”

Pardee Keynote Symposia are special events of broad interest to the geoscience community. Examples of topics include those on the leading edge in a scientific discipline or area of public policy and those that address broad fundamental problems, provide new interdisciplinary insights, or focus on global problems.

Abstract

The Keweenaw Peninsula in Upper Michigan sits at the heart of the Midcontinent Rift and is renowned for the world’s largest accessible native copper deposit and Lake Superior, the largest freshwater lake on Earth. The geologic underpinnings of the Keweenaw have fostered relationships with land and water for millennia and has imbued our place with significant sites that provide opportunity to broaden both Earth science and cultural literacy. Geoheritage offers opportunities to learn from the many stories, the issues impacting our community, and opportunities for sustainable economic development – all rooted in Earth systems processes.

Read more at GSA Connects 2022, by Erika Vye and Bill Rose.

Emily Street on Society for Mining, Metallurgy & Exploration Scholarships

Emily Street
Emily Street

Undergraduate Emily Street (mining engineering) was quoted by Mining Engineering Online, the official publication of the Society for Mining, Metallurgy & Exploration (SME), in a story about the impact of SME scholarships on the recipients and their futures in the mining industry.

In April, Street was awarded two academic scholarships by SME: the SMEF/MMSA Presidential Scholarship and the Gerald V. Henderson Memorial Scholarship.

She heard about SME scholarships through SME e-mails and through her advisor, Dr. Nathan Manser. “Dr. Manser always offers to write recommendations and encourages students to join SME,” said Street.

Related

Michigan Tech wins 2022 AIPG Student Chapter of the Year Award

Large group of students wearing hard hats outside of a mine entrance.
MTU AIPG Student Chapter/Geology Club Group at Quincy Mine Adit in Hancock. See the Annual Report for 2021-2022.

The 2022 American Institute of Professional Geologists (AIPG) Student Chapter of the Year Award goes to Michigan Technological University. This is the third year running for Michigan Tech!

Each year, AIPG recognizes the most outstanding student chapter for its activities, achievements, and contributions to the Institute. Nationwide there are 55 student chapters at AIPG. Some of the recent activities included a resume roast, Quincy Mine Tour, grad school presentation, poster meeting, Meet a Professional, Eben Ice Caves Trip, and group carpool to Central Michigan University for ASBOG Examination.

The 2021/2022 AIPG Student Chapter Officers: President, Elana Barth; Vice President Olivia Salvaggio; Secretary Nolan Gamet; and Treasurer Emilie Pray.

The 2022/2023 AIPG Student Chapter Officers: President Grace Ojala; Vice President Max Strange; Secretary Hannah Miller-Young; and Treasurer Emilie Pray.

The Chapter Sponsor is David Adler, CPG-11377, a Mannik & Smith Group Certified Professional Geologist (BS Geology ‘82). David Adler, inducted into the GMES Academy in October, has been awarded the AIPG Presidential Certificate of Merit for excellent contributions to the AIPG Michigan Section as chairman of the Michigan Section CPG application process.

The Chapter’s Faculty Sponsor is Chad Deering, associate professor in the Department of Geological and Mining Engineering and Sciences.

The AIPG Michigan Section President is Mellisa Powers-Taylor and the AIPG Michigan Section Liaison is Cody Stoddard.

Congratulations once again on a job well done. The GMES department is proud of your continued success!

Chad Deering on Key Links in the Evolution of Earth’s Rock Cycle and Its Ocean

Chad Deering
Chad Deering

Chad Deering (GMES) was quoted in a University of Wisconsin Oshkosh news story picked up by Science Daily and Phys.org. The story explains how a study led by Deering and UW-Oshkosh geologist Timothy Paulsen links zircon data from sandstones recovered from Earth’s major continental landmasses to the evolution of the Earth’s rock cycle and its oceans. Snehamoy Chatterjee (GMES) is also a co-author on the study.

“Continents tend to be worn down by weathering and rivers tend to transport this sediment to the oceans, leaving scattered puzzle pieces for geologists to fit together,” said Chad Deering, a Michigan Tech geologist and coauthor on the paper. “There is increasing evidence that important pieces of the puzzle are found in the ancient beach and river sediments produced through continental weathering and erosion.”

Read more at UW Oshkosh Today, by Natalie Johnson.

Continental Magmatism and Uplift as the Primary Driver for First-Order Oceanic 87Sr/86Sr Variability with Implications for Global Climate and Atmospheric Oxygenation
T. Paulsen, C. Deering, J. Sliwinski, S. Chatterjee, and O. Bachman
GSA Today, pp. 4–10, 2022.
doi.org/10.1130/GSATG526A.1

Simon Carn Comments on Tonga Eruption

Umbrella cloud from the volcanic eruption.
Umbrella cloud from the Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha‘apai eruption, captured by NOAA’s Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite 17 (GOES-17).

A powerful volcanic eruption has obliterated a small, uninhabited South Pacific island known as Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha‘apai. Damage assessments are still ongoing, but preliminary reports indicate that some communities in the island nation of Tonga have been severely damaged by volcanic ash and significant tsunami waves.

“The umbrella cloud was about 500 kilometers (300 miles) in diameter at its maximum extent,” said Michigan Tech volcanologist Simon Carn. “That is comparable to Pinatubo and one of the largest of the satellite era. However, the involvement of water in the Tonga eruption may have increased the explosivity compared to a purely magmatic eruption like Pinatubo.”

Read more at Earth Observatory by Adam Voiland, with Mike Carlowicz.