Also In This Section
  • Categories

  • Recent News

  • Category: Research

    1010 with Jung Bae, Applied Computing, ME-EM


    You are invited to spend one-zero-one-zero—that is, ten—minutes with Dr. Jung Yun Bae on Thursday, April 1, from 4:30 to 4:40 p.m. EST.

    Dr. Bae is an Assistant Professor in the Applied Computing and Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics departments.

    She will discuss her research, the Applied Computing department, and answer questions.

    Dr. Bae earned her Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering at Texas A&M University and worked as a research professor at Korea University before she joined Michigan Tech.

    Dr. Bae’s research interests include:

    • Robotics, Multi-robot systems
    • Coordination of Heterogeneous Robot Systems
    • Vehicle Routing Problems
    • Multi-robot System Control and Optimization
    • Autonomous Navigation
    • Unmanned Vehicles
    • Operational Research for Autonomous Vehicles

    We look forward to spending 1010 minutes with you!

    Visit the 1010 with … webpage here.


    Sidike Paheding, Applied Computing, Publishes Paper in IEEE Access

    A paper co-authored by Sidike Paheding, Applied Computing, has been published in the journal, IEEE Access. “Trends in Deep Learning for Medical Hyperspectral Image Analysis,” was available for early access on March 24, 2021.

    The paper discusses the implementation of deep learning for medical hyperspectral imaging.

    Co-authors of the paper are Uzair Khan, Colin Elkin, and Vijay Devabhaktuni, all with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University Northwest.

    Abstract

    Deep learning algorithms have seen acute growth of interest in their applications throughout several fields of interest in the last decade, with medical hyperspectral imaging being a particularly promising domain. So far, to the best of our knowledge, there is no review paper that discusses the implementation of deep learning for medical hyperspectral imaging, which is what this work aims to accomplish by examining publications that currently utilize deep learning to perform effective analysis of medical hyperspectral imagery.

    This paper discusses deep learning concepts that are relevant and applicable to medical hyperspectral imaging analysis, several of which have been implemented since the boom in deep learning. This will comprise of reviewing the use of deep learning for classification, segmentation, and detection in order to investigate the analysis of medical hyperspectral imaging. Lastly, we discuss the current and future challenges pertaining to this discipline and the possible efforts to overcome such trials.

    DOI: 10.1109/ACCESS.2021.3068392

    IEEE Access is a multidisciplinary, applications-oriented, all-electronic archival journal that continuously presents the results of original research or development across all of IEEE’s fields of interest. Supported by article processing charges, its hallmarks are a rapid peer review and publication process with open access to all readers.


    Our Stories: Dr. Robert Pastel, Assoc. Prof., Computer Science

    This is part of a series of short introductions about College students, faculty, and staff that we would like to include in the Weekly Download. Would you like to be featured? Send a photo and some background info about yourself to computing@mtu.edu.

    Dr. Robert Pastel, Associate Professor of Computer Science

    • Advisor to Humane Interface Design Enterprise (HIDE)
    • Has been teaching at Michigan Tech for about 20 years, and teaching for 30 years.
    • Researcher with the Human-Centered Computing group of the Institute of Computing and Cybersystems (ICC)

    Education

    • PhD, University of New Mexico, Physics
    • MS, Computer Science, Michigan Tech

    Faculty Profile


    Classes Dr. Pastel teaches: 
    o    CS5760 – Human-Computer Interaction – Usability Evaluation and Testing 
    o    CS4791 and CS4792 – Senior Design
    o    ENT1960 – ENT5960 – Humane Interface Design Enterprise

    The “coolest” class you teach, and why: All my classes are “cool” because they all involve making applications that will be used by people. The “coolest” class is CS4760 – User Interface – Design and Implementation where students work with scientists across the world to make citizen science applications.

    The importance of your class topics to the overall understanding of Computing and your discipline: In all my classes, students learn to design and implement usable applications for people.

    Your teaching philosophy: My teaching philosophy is that students learn best by experience and working with others. Consequently students work in teams on project for clients. 

    Research projects in which students are assisting: 

    • StreamCLIMES – Large collaborative project studying bio diversity of intermittent streams. I’m responsible for developing a web applications monitoring the stream.
    • FloodAware – Large collaborative project recording and modelling flooding in urban areas. I’m responsible for developing the citizen science effort.
    • KeTT – Keweenaw Time Traveler – Historical geospatial information citizen science website for user to record region’s history and explore the maps and stories. 

    Interests beyond teaching and research: The outdoors: skiing, biking and hiking. Every summer, he takes a one-month backpacking trip. 


    Human Factors Grad Student Wins Hackathon, Cites Pandemic for Opportunity

    One Michigan Tech graduate student found a silver lining of the pandemic-driven shift to remote study: the ability to gain experiences previously prevented by distance. And “gained experience” is an understatement, as Brooke Poyhonen recently was on the winning team in the Texas Health Care Challenge, an online hackathon that sought solutions to problems in health care.

    The winning project, from Team WatsonCares, focused on women’s postpartum health and proposed a suite of services for new mothers:

    • A natural-language chatbot, powered by IBM Watson’s AI, to answer patient questions about both mental and physical health
    • A community feature allowing postpartum women to support one another
    • Deep informational and support resources

    Poyhonen said the team came together because after hearing initial “problem pitches,” in which existing teams outline the projects they want to tackle, some were uninterested in the originally pitched ideas. So they created their own team. “Ideally, we want the chatbot to be personalized to the patient’s history,” she said. “And we wanted to create a safe space for women to talk to each other.”

    Poyhonen will complete her accelerated M.S. in applied cognitive science and human factors this spring. She earned a B.S. in psychology from Michigan Tech in 2020. Both degrees are offered by the Cognitive and Learning Sciences department in the University’s College of Sciences and Arts.

    The Texas challenge is normally on-site only, and she appreciated the chance to participate and urges other students to seek out similar opportunities. “It was great to meet people from around the country and work with a team on a real-world goal,” Poyhonen said. “It’s a great networking opportunity and gives me a concrete project to discuss in interviews. It was just so rewarding.”

    The team’s prize included $120,000 in credits toward IBM products and services, a smaller cash award, and temporary office space with a Dallas venture capital firm. Poyhonen is working with team members on the project as a start-up while also pursuing other opportunities.

    She got her first taste of hackathons over the winter in the Work Related Musculoskeletal Disorders Grand Challenge, run by the American Registry for Diagnostic Medical Sonography. The challenge was to help the up to 90% of sonographers who develop disorders such as occupational overuse syndrome. Her team, which included a sonography mentor, an engineering student and two sonography students, created the Air Buddy, a device to help sonographers apply pressure to a probe with reduced physical stress. Poyhonen’s team won first place after judges deliberated for an entire week after the month-long window for teams to work on the problem.

    Kelly Steelman, interim chair of the Cognitive and Learning Sciences Department, said hackathons are great supplements to classroom experiences. “I commend Brooke for taking the initiative to seek out design challenges as a way to build her portfolio of experiences and hone the skills she’s learned in our program,” Steelman said. “Brooke took advantage of opportunities through outside organizations, but we also offer hack-a-thons right here on campus.”

    She said Husky Innovate is currently planning their inaugural hack-a-thon as part of an initiative to grow the human-centered design community at Michigan Tech. For more information on this, contact Lisa Casper.

    Dr. Steelman is a member of the Human-Centered Computing research group of the Institute of Computing and Cybersystems (ICC).

    Michigan Tech’s graduate program in Applied Cognitive Science and Human Factors teaches students how to apply principles of psychology to the design and evaluation of human-technological systems. Steelman said Beth Veinott, director of the Center for Human-Centered Computing, frequently reinforces for students that, “If you get the psychology right first, you design the right system, it is easier to train, and people are more likely to adopt it.”


    Register for Michigan Tech’s Design Expo, Thursday, April 15

    by Pavlis Honor College

    Now’s the time to register to attend Virtual Design Expo, the annual Enterprise and Senior Design project showcase at Michigan Tech.

    Once again, for the second time ever in its 21-year history, Design Expo will take place virtually. We’ve excitedly taken lessons learned from last year’s first virtual Expo and fused it with new ways of connecting to make the 2021 Design Expo more engaging and safe to attend in real-time!

    Design Expo puts our undergraduate student innovators and their corporate and community sponsors and faculty advisors front and center.

    Every year, teams showcase their solutions to complex, real-world and life-changing challenges. Teams compete for thousands of dollars in cash awards—and receive priceless, well-deserved recognition. 

    Guests and judges will need to register in order to attend by April 9. 

    This year’s event will happen in multiple segments online via Zoom and Gatherly. 

    Monday, April 12

    • Noon — Remote, asynchronous viewing and judging of team videos opens on the Design Expo website, mtu.edu/expo.

    Thursday, April 15

    • 11 to 11:30 a.m. — Opening remarks via live Zoom webinar
    • 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. — Synchronous event with student teams begins: take part in real-time interaction/Q&A with students using Gatherly
    • 3 to 3:30 p.m. — Presentation of Awards via Zoom live webinar
    • 3:30 p.m. — Virtual Design Expo 2021 concludes


    Physics Colloquium Today, March 18, 4 pm

    The next Physics Colloquium will be held at 4 p.m. today (March 18) via Zoom. Alice Allen will present “Schrödinger’s code: Opening the computational box.”

    Allen is a faculty specialist in the Astronomy Department at the University of Maryland (College Park) and editor-in-chief of the Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL). Her abstract and bio can be viewed here.

    If you haven’t registered for the weekly Physics Colloquium series in the past, please register in advance for this event.


    Spend 1010 Minutes with Gorkem Asilioglu


    You are invited to spend one-zero-one-zero—that is, ten—minutes with Gorkem Asilioglu, Computer Science, on Thurday, March 18, from 5:30 to 5:40 p.m. EST.

    Asilioglu is a lecturer in the Department of Computer Science. His research interests include computer architecture, high-performance computing, programming languages, and CS education.

    Join the Zoom meeting here.

    We look forward to spending 1010 minutes with you!

    Visit the 1010 with … webpage here.


    CS Lecture: Kelly Steelman, CLS, March 19, 3 pm

    The Department of Computer Science will present a lecture by Dr. Kelly Steelman, Cognitive and Learning Sciences, on Friday, March 19, 2021, at 3:00 p.m.

    The title of the lecture is, “Keeping Up with Tech.”

    Join the virtual lecture here.

    Steelman is interim department chair and associate professor in the Department of Cognitive and Learning Sciences. Her research interests include basic and applied attention, models of attention, human performance in aviation, display design, tech adoption, and technology training.

    Lecture Title

    “Keeping Up with Tech”

    Lecture Abstract

    COVID has revealed much in the past year, including our dependence on technology and the challenges that many of us experience trying to keep up with it. Dr. Kelly Steelman has spent the past 15 years studying human attention and applying it to support the introduction of new technologies in contexts ranging from aviation to education.

    In her presentation, Steelman will provide an overview of her research, using examples from Next Gen Aviation and the BASIC Digital Literacy Training Program to illustrate how understanding human attention can help us predict the consequences of introducing new technology, improve the design of technology, and support training to help people keep up with the rapid pace of technological change.



    CS Dept. Lecture: Tim Frick, Mightybytes

    The Department of Computer Science will present a lecture by Tim Frick, founder and president of Mightybytes, on Friday, April 9, 2021, at 3:00 p.m.

    In his talk, “People, Planet, Pixels: Toward Sustainable Digital Products and Practices,” Frick will discuss how sustainable web design and responsible digital practices can help create an internet that is clean, efficient, open, honest, regenerative, and resilient.

    Lecture Title

    “People, Planet, Pixels: Toward Sustainable Digital Products and Practices”

    Speaker Bio

    Tim Frick started his digital agency Mightybytes in 1998 to help purpose-driven companies, social enterprises, and large nonprofits solve problems, amplify their impact, and drive measurable results. He is the author of four books, including Designing for Sustainability: A Guide to Building Greener Digital Products and Services. Tim regularly presents at conferences and offers workshops on sustainable design, measuring impact, and problem solving in the digital economy.

    Lecture Abstract

    The internet has a larger environmental impact than the commercial airline industry. It currently produces approximately 3.8% of global carbon emissions, which are rising in line with our hunger to consume more data. Increasingly, web technologies are also being used to sow discontent, erode privacy, prompt unethical decisions, and, in some countries, undermine personal freedoms and the well-being of society. Web technology has the potential to bring huge benefits to society and the environment, but only if we use it wisely.

    In this talk, author and digital agency owner Tim Frick will discuss how sustainable web designand responsible digital practices can help us create an internet that is clean, efficient, open, honest, regenerative, and resilient—principles outlined in the Sustainable Web Manifesto, of which Tim is a co-author. Elements of this talk are also based on Tim’s book, Designing for Sustainability: A Guide to Building Greener Digital Products and Services. Creating an internet that works for people and planet is possible. The methods described in this talk will show you how.


    Cooperative Eco-driving Automation Improves Energy Efficiency, Safety on City Streets

    by Kelley Christensen, University Marketing and Communications

    Connected and automated vehicles, which can interact vehicle to vehicle (V2V) and between vehicles and roadway infrastructure like traffic signals and stop signs (V2I), promise to save energy and improve safety. In a new study published in Transportation Research Part B, Kuilin Zhang (CEE/CS) along with Shuaidong Zhao ’18, now a senior quantitative analyst at National Grid, propose a modeling framework for V2V and V2I cooperative driving. Cooperative driving helps cars and their drivers safely and efficiently navigate.

    The framework uses an eco-driving algorithm that prioritizes saving fuel and reducing emissions. The automated algorithm calculates location-based traffic control devices and roadway constraints using maps and geographic information. Read the full story on mtu.edu/news.

    Kuilin Zhang is a researcher with the Institute of Computing and Cybersystems’ (ICC) Center for Cyber-Physical Systems.