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    AI, Mobile Security Grad-level Research Assistant Needed

    Dr. Xiaoyong (Brian) Yuan and Dr. Bo Chen are seeking an hourly paid graduate research assistant to work in the areas of artificial intelligence and mobile security. The project is expected to begin Summer 2021 (5/10/2021).

    Preferred Qualifications:
    1.     Passion for research in artificial intelligence and mobile security.
    1.     Familiar with Android OS and Android app development.
    2.     Basic knowledge of machine learning and deep learning.
    3.     Solid programming skills in Java, Python, or related programming languages. 
    4.     Experience with popular deep learning frameworks, such as Pytorch and Tensorflow is a plus.

    To Apply: Please send a resume and a transcript to Dr. Yuan (xyyuan@mtu.edu).


    MS Defense: Vijay Pathak

    by Mechanical Engineering

    Vijay Pathak (advisor Ghosh Susantra) a master’s in Mechanical Engineering student will present his master’s defense at 2 p.m. tomorrow (April 14) via Zoom.

    The title of the presentation is “Studying the Effects of Initial Crack Angle on the Crack Propagation in Graphene Nano-Ribbon Through Molecular Dynamics Simulations.”


    Master’s Defense: Chinmay Kondekar

    Electrical Engineering Master’s candidate Chinmay Kondekar (advisor: Aleksandr Sergeyev), will present his master’s defense at 11 a.m. tomorrow (April 13) via Zoom.

    The title of his presentation is “Integration of Robotic and Electro-Pneumatic Systems Using Advanced Control and Communication Schemes.”


    ECE Doctoral Defense – Adam Webb

    by Electrical and Computer Engineering Department

    Electrical Engineering doctoral candidate Adam Webb will present his PhD defence at 3:30 p.m. Thursday (April 15) via Zoom.

    The title of his presentation is “Novel Methods in Computational Imaging with Applications in Remote Sensing.”

    Webb’s co-advisors are Timothy Schulz (ECE) and Timothy Havens (CC).


    ECE Master’s Defense: Chinmay Rajaram Kondekar

    by Electrical and Computer Engineering

    Electrical Engineering Master’s candidate Chinmay Kondekar (advisor: Aleksandr Sergeyev), will present his master’s defense at 11 a.m. Tuesday (April 13) via Zoom

    The title of his presentation is “Integration of Robotic and Electro-Pneumatic Systems Using Advanced Control and Communication Schemes.” 


    Graduate Research Colloquium 2021

    by Graduate Student Government

    This year’s Graduate Research Colloquium organized by the Graduate Student Government was hosted virtually due to COVID restrictions. There were in total 48 presentations — 17 poster presenters and 31 oral presenters.

    Poster presentations took place in a pre-recorded video style and the oral sessions were hosted live via Zoom. You can watch all the poster videos and recordings for the oral sessions here. Each presentation was scored by two judges from the same field of research.

    Participants were able to gain valuable feedback from these judges before presenting their research at an actual conference. It was stiff competition amongst all presenters. Following are the winners for each of these sessions.

    Of the many presentations were the following by two graduate students affiliated with the College of Computing.

    Simulating the Spread of Infectious Diseases
    Meara Pellar-Kosbar, Data Science

    This simulation is designed to show how a fictional viral illness could spread among people in a virtual room. Over the course of the virtual simulation, a number of automatic simulated people called subjects will move about an adjustable virtual grid. During this time, subjects will come into contact with each other and with item cells in the virtual room. Subjects will be exposed to this fictional virus via contact with other subjects, items, and via the air when within a certain distance of a contagious subject. The viral counts of each subject will be tracked and shown as the simulation runs, showing how the actions of the subjects’ affects their viral counts.

    Cultural Competence Effects of Repeated Implicit Bias Training
    Karen Colbert, Social Sciences

    Karen Colbert is a PhD student in the Computational Sciences and Engineering department.

    Abstract: Diversity training literature suggests that mandatory and recurrent sessions should maximize training efficacy, but research has primarily focused on single, brief training sessions that are often voluntary. Michigan Tech is one of few universities to implement required and repeated diversity training for all faculty who serve on search, tenure, and promotion committees. The goal of this study is to evaluate the training’s effectiveness, as well as to fill the gap in research on mandatory recurring diversity training. To do this, we anonymously surveyed faculty members on their knowledge, attitudes, and skills related to content from the Diversity Literacy program and scored responses to create a single composite score for each participant. We hypothesized that composite Cultural Competency Score (CCS) would be higher for faculty who 1) have taken more refresher trainings, and 2) completed training more recently. This study included 130 total respondents (large sample), 69 of whom provided their Diversity Literacy completion information anonymously through Human Resources (small sample). Composite CCS did not differ significantly by frequency of training, H(2)=3.78, p=.151. CCS did differ significantly by years since last training, F(2,63)=4.436, p=.016. Results from both large and small groups showed no statistical significant relationship between CCS and faculty committee service. CCS was negatively correlated with years employed at Tech in both the large (r=-0.363, p=0.002) and small (r = -0.258, p=0.01) samples. This relationship between low CCS and longer employment at Tech may additionally be related to the Diversity Literacy program’s implementation in 2010. Qualitative responses were also collected regarding training material that faculty found most memorable (N=102) and most confident to put into practice (N=93).

    View all the Research Colloquium abstracts here.