Category: Events

Learn to Model, Model to Learn

Social Sciences Colloquia Friday

John Arnold will present “Learn to Model, Model to Learn,” Friday, Jan. 31, 4 p.m., AOB 201. Arnold is a PhD student in Social Sciences and has an M.S. in Historic Preservation and M.Arch in Architecture from the University of Oregon. He will be talking about the applicability of building information modeling (BIM) as a tool to investigate and manage heritage resources.

From Tech Today.

Fred Quivik Presents Fourth Thursday in History

Fourth Thursday in History: Comparing Butte, Montana, and Michigan’s Copper Country
Thursday, January 23, 2014, 7:00 pm
Keweenaw National Park Headquarters
25970 Red Jacket Road, Calumet

Fred Quivik
Associate Professor of History
Social Sciences, Michigan Tech

Butte and the Keweenaw Peninsula were the world’s two leading suppliers of copper in 1913. At the time, Butte miners had been unionized for three decades, setting a standard Michigan miners hoped to achieve when they went on strike that year. Join Fred Quivik as he compares the mining districts, exploring ways that two different mineral deposits helped to shape two distinct mining histories.

Read more at Tech Today.

Nancy Langston Educates about Mining Recommendations

Professor Nancy Langston (SS) produced a webinar to help educate the public about new recommendations for mining in the Lake Superior Basin, issued by the Lake Superior Binational Forum, of which she is a US member.

From Tech Today.

Mining Recommendations Webinar with Nancy Langston

Dr. Nancy Langston explains the Lake Superior Binational Forum’s recommendations for responsible mining in the Lake Superior basin in this webinar produced in December 2013.

Watch the video from the Lake Superior Binational Forum.

Responsible Mining Recommendations from the Lake Superior Binational Forum

For two years, the Lake Superior Binational Forum has been examining all aspects of mining operations in the Lake Superior basin to see how mining affects water and land resources and whether mine operations can be responsibly conducted to minimize impacts.

Read more at the Lake Superior Binational Forum.

Schelly delivers Green Lecture on Technology

Asst. Prof. Chelsea Schelly presented a lecture last night in the 2013 Green Lecture Series on, “Technology, Nature & Society: Seeing the Social in the Material of Everyday Life.”

Read coverage of the event from the Daily Mininnig Gazette.

About the Lecture:

The technologies that we use in our everyday life – from electricity and transportation technologies, to cell phones and computers, to foods – impact the environment and the ways we relate to one another and to our communities. These technologies also shape the social and political organization of our society. We learn what “normal” life is, through our interactions with the materials that make life possible and comfortable. However, our use of those materials is shaped, and often limited, by factors outside our control, such as the policies that influence their use. In this talk, I will present some of the reasons people adopt alternative technologies (related to broad lifestyle choices and the policies that influence our choices) and some of the potential implications of these alternative technologies for how we meet our material needs and comforts. By recognizing that these technologies have social implications, we can begin to question how to best use these technologies to promote sustainable communities.

Green Lecture: Technology, Nature & Society: Seeing the Social in the Materials of Everyday Life

Chelsea SchellyGreen Lecture: Technology, Nature & Society: Seeing the Social in the Materials of Everyday Life
By Dr. Chelsea Schelly, Assistant Professor, MTU Dept. of Social Sciences
Date & Time: Wednesday, December 11, 7:00—8:30 pm
Location: G002, Hesterberg Hall, Forestry Building, Michigan Tech

Cost: FREE Enjoy coffee & tea! (Participants are encouraged to bring cookies!)

The technologies that we use in our everyday life – from electricity and transportation technologies, to cell phones and computers, to foods – impact the environment and the ways we relate to one another and to our communities.

Read more at the College of Engineering Blog.

Lecture to address technologies’ impacts on everyday life TONIGHT, Dec. 11, at Michigan Tech

Her talk is sponsored by the Lake Superior Stewardship Initiative, Michigan Tech’s Department of Social Sciences, the Michigan Tech Center for Water and Society, the Keweenaw Unitarian Universalist Fellowship and the Keweenaw Land Trust.

Read more at Keweenaw Now.

Presentation on Feasibility of Minewater Geothermal Energy Development in Calumet

Minewater Geothermal Presentation InvitationExploring the Social Feasibility of Minewater Geothermal in Calumet
Public Presentation
Thursday, December 12, 2013
7:00 pm
CLK Schools Commons

A class of Michigan Tech undergraduate and graduate students have partnered with Main Street Calumet to conduct a research project investigating the social feasibility of tapping into the minewater beneath the village of Calumet for geothermal energy. Students in the class worked together with Calumet community members to understand the demand for energy use within the village, to measure distances between mine shafts and key locations, and to summarize opportunities and challenges for community development associated with using the legacy of mining in the community as a sustainable and independent energy source.

Students will present the results of this project in a free public presentation on December 12 at 7:00pm at the CLK Schools Commons. A discussion and social will follow the presentation with coffee and snacks. Please join us! Everyone is welcome! CLK Schools is located at 57070 Mine Street in Calumet. Enter through the west entrance off Red Jacket Road. For additional information or questions please contact Dr. Richelle Winkler at rwinkler@mtu.edu or 906-487-1886.

Michigan Tech students to present study on feasibility of minewater as geothermal energy for Calumet Dec. 12

The public is warmly invited to a community gathering and presentation of the results of a research project assessing the social and economic feasibility of tapping into mine shafts for geothermal energy in Calumet. The presentation will look at the opportunities and challenges associated with using the legacy of mining in the community as a sustainable and independent energy source. The project is the result of a collaborative effort between Main Street Calumet, Dr. Richelle Winkler and students at Michigan Technological University.

The purpose of the presentation and discussion this Thursday is to help people in the community decide whether this is something they would like to do, Winkler explained.

Read more at Keweenaw Now, by Michele Bourdieu.

Class Investigates Tapping Mines for Geothermal Heat: Presentation Tonight

Richelle Winkler, assistant professor of social sciences, taught the class of undergraduates and grad students and says that they learned much from the project.

“This was a real-world research project,” Winkler says. “The students learned a lot about the community: how they work together, how to empower people to ask questions and get excited about a project.”

As Winkler’s group looks at the social aspects, an Enterprise team is looking at the technical side. That group is advised by Jay Meldrum, director of the Keweenaw Research Center, which is currently using mine water geothermal for heating and cooling.

Read more at Tech Today, by Dennis Walikainen.

Class Investigates Tapping Mines for Geothermal Heat in Calumet

Richelle Winkler, assistant professor of social sciences, taught the class of undergraduates and graduate students. She says that they learned much from the project.

“This was a real-world research project,” Winkler explains. “The students learned a lot about the community: how they work together, how to empower people to ask questions and get excited about a project.”

Read more at Michigan Tech News, by Dennis Walikainen.

MTU students present Calumet proposal to heat buildings with mine water

With 37 mine shafts holding billions of gallons of water beneath the village of Calumet, the researchers took it upon themselves to see it put to use.

“This is a sustainable resource, and we have so many around the area that one possible thing that we could save on is cost, and that seems to be a huge issue around this area,” said student researcher, Carrie Karvakko.

Read more and watch the video at Upper Michigans Source, by Sarah Blakely.

Film Premiere of Red Metal

Red MetalFilm premiere of Red Metal: The Copper Country Strike of 1913
Friday, December 6, 2013
7:00 pm, Calumet Theatre

The Michigan Technological University Archives and Copper Country Historical Collections presents the premiere of Red Metal: The Copper Country Strike of 1913, a documentary film by Emmy award-winning producer Jonathan Silvers & Saybrook Productions.

Admission is free. Donations will support the Calumet Theatre and the Michigan Tech Archives.

Social sciences emeritus faculty Larry Lankton and Kim Hoagland appear in this film.

Read more at Michigan Tech Archives Blog.