Category: Events

Armistice and Aftermath Symposium

WW1CC logo with Quincy Mine

The WWI Armistice and Aftermath Symposium is a two-day event, Friday and Saturday (Sept. 28 and 29) that includes presentations, a film and concert, most on the Michigan Tech campus.

Armistice Day 2018 marks the centenary end of World War I. This symposium explores the conditions and impacts of the Great War as experienced during and afterward.

All events are open to the public and admission is free. The full program is available online. A box supper on Friday and a buffet lunch on Saturday are available for $5 and must be reserved in advance by no later than noon Wednesday (Sept. 26).

Friday’s events:

  • 4-5 p.m.: Sue Collins (HU) “Local Theaters, Propaganda and WWI.” Orpheum Theater, Hancock
  • 6-7 p.m.: Superior Wind Symphony, “Europe, America, and the World: An Outdoor Concert.” On Walker lawn if weather permits; otherwise McArdle Theatre
  • 7:30-8:30 p.m.: John Morrow Jr. (University of Georgia), “African American Experience in WWI and Aftermath.” Rozsa Lobby

Saturday’s events:

  • 8:45 a.m.: Symposium Committee Welcome, MUB Ballroom
  • 9-11:15 a.m.: Symposium Panels (see full program online)
  • 12-1 p.m.: Lynn Dumenil (Occidental College), “Women and the Great War.” MUB Ballroom
  • 1:15-3:45 p.m.: Symposium Panels
  • 7:30-9 p.m.: “Copper Country at the Silver Screen in 1918,” Rozsa Theater. A silent film program featuring a 1918 Charlie Chaplin film, film shorts, newsreel, and Four Minute-Man performance; music performed by Jay Warren, Chicago’s foremost Photoplay organist.


Volunteers Needed to Finish WWI Trench

WW1CC logo with Quincy MineOne more push over the top—a hard-working crew of about a dozen people got the WWI Trench at the corner of US-41 and MacInnes about 80 percent completed last Saturday and we’d like volunteers from 2 to 5 p.m. today (Sept. 12) to help finish it off.

We need a bit more help with sandbagging, fence construction, ‘barbed wire’ (mock) installation and landscaping. Drop in to help for 15 minutes or three hours, and wear close-toed shoes. All other equipment provided. Help Michigan Tech make history while remembering history.


WWI Trench Construction Starts Today

WW1CC logo with Quincy MineThe next phase in the construction of the World War I immersive firing trench takes place over the next two days. The 100-foot-long, five-foot-deep trench will open Monday, Sept. 24. The trench is part of “World War I & the Copper Country,” a community-wide commemoration of the Copper Country’s involvement in the First World War.

The actual digging of the trench will begin this morning. Organizers say the contractor is expected to arrive at around 8:30 a.m. with the digging to begin sometime later.

Volunteers are needed for the construction of the firing trench tomorrow (Sept. 8). Last month, the Michigan Tech football team filled about 2,500 burlap sandbags that will be used for the trench.

Those willing to volunteer should come to the trench site near the intersection of U.S. 41 and MacInnes Drive at 10 a.m. tomorrow or check http://ww1cc.mtu.edu/2018/09/trench-updates for the latest information.  Spread the word.


Two Exhibits Open Concurrently at the Rozsa Center Gallery Friday

WW1CC logo with Quincy MineAmerican and French Propaganda Posters” and “Shell-Shocked: Footage & Sounds of the Front,” are two separate exhibits that are meant to be seen together.

Both are part of the community-wide centennial commemoration of the “Great War, World War I & the Copper Country,” running through Nov. 11.

During the gallery opening reception, Stefka Hristova (HU) will give a talk entitled, “Iconography & War.” World War I called for broad public participation through multiple avenues: joining the military, buying liberty bonds or saving stamps, conserving food, taking up a public job. Everyone was expected to do their part, and new modes of propaganda were key to ensuring society’s “total mobilization.”

“American and French Propaganda Posters,” reflects numerous appeals to mass mobilization, resulting in some iconic images from the American campaign, for example, James Montgomery Flagg’s “Uncle Sam” and A.E. Foringer’s “Greatest Mother in the World” for the American Red Cross.

Hristova’s talk will take a closer look at the posters to reveal patterns of representations of men, women and children that tie into changing norms of social propriety.

In contrast to the patriotic rhetoric of propaganda posters, the immersive multimedia display of “Shell-Shocked” brings to life the reality of soldiers who fought the war, inviting visitors to experience soldiers’ journey from training to combat, from life at the front to demobilization and return home, if they survived the war’s abuses.

An installation space featuring a custom circular steel truss equipped with six 40” screens, twelve loudspeakers and 6,000 watts of available amplified power, “Shell-Shocked” recreates the sounds to accompany historic silent film footage of the war.

The installation was crafted by Kent Cyr (VPA) and Christopher Plummer (VPA) with sound-design assistance from students Luke Johnson, Brendan Espinosa and Noah Budd from the Visual and Performing Arts Department, Sound Design-BA program.

“American and French Propaganda Posters” are on loan from the permanent collection of the Marquette Regional History Center. The exhibits are made possible in part by a grant from the Michigan Humanities Council (MHC), an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH).

Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in the WW1CC program do not necessarily reflect those of the NEH or MHC.

Light refreshments will be served at the opening reception, 5-7 p.m. Friday (Sept. 7). The exhibits will run until Oct. 2, during gallery hours: 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday – Friday and 1 to 8 p.m. Saturday.


Lankton to Give Presentation on Quincy History

Larry LanktonLocal historian, educator and author Larry Lankton (Emeritus SS) will present the latest in the Quincy Mine Hoist Association’s “History on the Hill” series at 7 p.m. Thursday (July 26) at the Quincy Mine 1894 Hoist House.

Lankton’s presentation is titled, “The National Park Service Arrives on Quincy Hill, 1978.” In the summer of 1978 a team from the Historic American Engineering Record (HAER), a part of the National Park Service, conducted a 10-week study of the social history of the Quincy Mining Company.

Lankton led the HAER team in 1978 and moved to the Keweenaw three years later to continue his research and write about the local copper industry. Find out more about Lankton’s presentation.

History on the Hill presentations are free and open to the public.


Winkler and Prehoda Present in L’Anse

L’ANSE, Mich. (WLUC) – The Village of L’Anse held a community meeting Tuesday to gauge the interest in creating a community solar garden.

The potential location for the solar garden would be the industrial park near the Bishop Baraga Memorial on Lambert Road. It could power up to 12 whole homes and be split into 200 shares that the community would be able to buy into.

This meeting was hosted by the Upper Peninsula Solar Technical Assistance and Resource Team (UPSTART). UPSTART is comprised of members from Michigan Tech, WPPI Energy, and the Western Upper Peninsula Planning and Development Region.

Community members that attended this meeting were given quick presentation on the potential solar garden. Afterwards, they were asked a few questions to gauge their interest in having one in L’Anse.

“We want to know is this going to work in L’Anse? But also, do folks in L’Anse want this to happen,” said Emily Prehoda, UPSTART Michigan Tech Grad Student Representative. “That’s kind of what we’re getting out of tonight. It’s supposed to be informational for them, but also informational for us. We want to know, do they want this to happen?”

UPSTART will be reviewing the responses after Tuesday’s meeting and going from there. If the responses are positive, construction on the new solar garden could start as soon as summer of 2018.

To see more story’s on the meeting follow the following links:

ABC 10

Keweenaw Report


Anthropology Student participates in Undergrad Research Symposium

imedImageJoe Iwanicki – Anthropology – Social Sciences
Iwanicki’s research, The Archaeology of Trade: A Study of a Twentieth Century Logging Camp, was presented at Michigan Tech’s 2017 Undergraduate Research Symposium this past week. With the assistance of LouAnn Wurst, Iwanicki looked at archaeological data from a 1900’s lumber camp in the Munising Michigan area called Coalwood. The data consists of artifacts that allow for investigation of trade and commodity flows. The archaeological record is combined with GIS to map and recreate the trade networks of the past, something rarely explored by archaeologists.

The Undergraduate Research Symposium highlights the amazing cutting-edge research being conducted on Michigan Tech’s campus by some of our best and brightest undergraduate students.

The students showcasing their work today have spent a significant portion of the past year working alongside Michigan Tech faculty and graduate students to explore, discover and create new knowledge. They’ve spent long hours in the lab or out in the field designing experiments, gathering data, creating new models and testing hypotheses. They’ve applied their classroom knowledge in new and sometimes unexpected ways, and developed new skills that will propel them forward in their careers.


Exhibit: The Making of Modern Houghton

Reception Poster 11.3.2015Carol MacLennan and her former students in Ethnographic Methods presented their work from Spring 2014 in an exhibit — The Making of Modern Houghton at the Carnegie Museum in Houghton November 3.  Reyna Bennett, Marc Hoffman, and Brenna Thompson discussed their research and that of four other students (who have since graduated) on Houghton’s post World War II history at a reception opening the exhibit.  The exhibit covers Houghton’s post mining development into an expanding city, changes in the commercial district and transportation,  the development of diversity and expansion at MTU, and city celebrations such as Parade of Nations and Old Settlers Ball.

The Carnegie Museum is open on Tuesday and Thursday 12:00-5:00 p.m. and on Saturday 12:00-4:00 p.m.


Keynote Faculty Panel at D80 Conference

 Jonathan Robins, Kari Henquinet, Sarah Fayen Scarlett, Steve Walton, Laura Walikainen Rouleau   Photo by MTU College of Engineering

Jonathan Robins, Kari Henquinet, Sarah Fayen Scarlett, Steve Walton, Laura Walikainen Rouleau Photo by MTU College of Engineering

Jonathan Robins, Kari Henquinet, Sarah Fayen Scarlett, Steve Walton, and Laura Walikainen Rouleau from the Department of Social Sciences led the keynote faculty panel discussion at this years D80 Conference held this past weekend on the MTU campus.  The panel topic was “How Does Change Happen?  Cases in Technology and Design”.

Click here for more information and photos from the conference.