Category: Events

SS Talk: Sarah Cowie on Science and Social Theory in Historical and Heritage Studies”

CowieIntegrating Science and Social Theory in Historical Archaeology and
Heritage Studies” at 4 PM on Friday, October 10, 2014, in AOB 201.
Sponsored by the Visiting Women & Minority Lecture Series and Department of Social Sciences.

Abstract: Too often in the last several decades of historical archaeology and related fields, practitioners have struggled with the artificial division between STEM applications and humanist frameworks.  We feel driven to identify ourselves as methods-people versus theory-people, processualists versus post-processualists, empiricists versus post-modernists, and positivists versus relativists.  However, historical archaeology’s reliance on varied theory and forms of data allows and encourages frameworks that bridge these perceived gaps.  This presentation offers a number of heritage projects from the western US that integrate science and social theory in brief case studies: GIS is used to study panoptic surveillance (at the company town of Fayette, Michigan); geochemical analyses inform studies of 19th century medicine, bodily discipline, symbolic violence, and environmental discrimination (at Fayette and a hospital site in Nevada); database management improves heritage consultation, public outreach, and social capital  with American Indian tribes (heritage stewardship program in Arizona); and federally funded science programs are supporting highly theoretical projects to find pragmatic solutions in federal/tribal heritage relations (Stewart Indian School collaborative archaeology project).  These types of projects and others like them show that despite the rhetoric of division between science and social theory, historical archaeologists can bridge these gaps regularly and with innovative, forward-thinking results.

 
 PDF FLYER:  Cowie 2014


SS Talk: Barry Solomon on “Policies for the Sustainable Development of Biofuels in Pan America”

image65900-persProfessor Barry Solomon

“Policies for the Sustainable Development of Biofuels in Pan America: A Review and Synthesis of Five Countries”

12:00 noon Friday, September 26 in AOB 201.

Abstract: Rapid growth of biofuel production in the United States and Brazil has increased interest in replicating this success in other Pan American nations. However, the continued use of food-based feedstock is widely seen as unsustainable and is, in some cases, linked to deforestation and increased greenhouse gas emissions. As a result, many nations are exploring the production and use of cellulosic feedstock. This presentation reviews the North-South axis of biofuel production in Pan America and its linkage with the agricultural sectors in five countries in Pan America. Focus will be given to biofuel policy goals,their results, and consideration of sustainability criteria and certification of producers. I examine the two largest producers – the United States and Brazil and two smaller emerging producers – Argentina and Canada; and one stalledprogram – Mexico to explore if biofuel programs are effectively improving environmental quality and sustainable development.

PDF Flyer


MacLennan Sugar Book Launch and Talk

Sovereign SugarFrom TechToday (4 Sept.)

Book and Academic Presentation on Hawaii’s Sugar Industry by Carol MacLennan

Carol MacLennan (SS) will offer remarks and slides on her recently published book, Sovereign Sugar: Industry and Environment in Hawai’i (Univ. of Hawai’i Press, 2014),  on Wednesday, Sept. 10 Tuesday Sept. 30 (note new date!), in the East Reading Room of the Van Pelt and Opie Library. The book unravels the tangled relationship between the sugar industry and Hawai’i’s cultural and natural landscapes. MacLennan’s publication is the first work to fully examine the complex tapestry of socioeconomic, political and environmental forces that shaped sugar’s role. Join us for Hawai’i-inspired refreshments at 4 p.m. with remarks to begin at 4:15 p.m.

This event is part of the library’s “Nexus: the Scholar and the Library” series. All faculty and academic staff are encouraged to be a part of this series. Contact Ellen Seidel (eseidel@mtu.edu) to discuss how you can share your on going research or scholarly achievements with the campus. 


2013/2014 Social Sciences Colloquia Series

A warm thank you to all our presenters for the 2013-2014 Social Sciences Colloquia Series and Brown Bags.

— Melissa Baird, Colloquia Coordinator


Jorge Garcia Fernandez

  • Think Digital: Photogrammetry on Cultural Heritage Documentation

Sean Gohman

  • Deux Lacs, Deux Moulins, et une Ville: The French Mining Experience in Copper Harbor

John Baeten

  • The Industrial Archaeology and Landscape of the Fairbanks Mining District

Carol Griskavich

  • The Other Calumet: Steel and Subinterns in Southeast Chicagoland, Summer 2013

Mary Durfee

  • “Mind the Gap: Conflicting Legal Rules in the Arctic”

Richelle Winkler & SS4700 Students

  • Exploring the Social Feasibility of Minewater Geothermal in Calumet (presented at the Calumet Public Library in Calumet)

John Arnold

  • Learn to Model, Model to Learn: BIM for IA

Adam Wellstead

  • Night of the Living Dead Theory: Structural-functionalism and Adaptation to Climate Change Policy

Dan Schneider

  • A First-Hand and Historical Perspective on the Practice of Letterpress Printing

Emma Schwaiger & Ankita Mandleia

  • An Interdisciplinary Approach to Understand Pollution: PCBs in Torch Lake

Emma Norman

  • The Power of Water: Renegotiating the Columbia River Treaty

Terry Sharik (Dean of the School of Forest Research and Environmental Science, MTU)

  • The Future of Natural Resource Science at Michigan Tech

Wendy Jepson (Associate Professor of Geography, Texas A & M)

  • “No-win waterscapes”: Household Water Insecurity in Low-Income Communities along the US-Mexico Border


Wendy Jepson Lectures

Wendy JepsonPlease join the social sciences department for two important lectures by Wendy Jepson, associate professor of geography at Texas A&M University, who is sponsored by the Visiting Women and Minority Lecture/Scholar Series.

Today, “Water insecurity as Environmental Justice: The Case of ‘Colonials’ along the US-Mexico Border” will be presented in GLRC 202 at 12:35-1:50 p.m.

Friday, April 25, “No-win waterscapes”: Household Water Insecurity in Low-Income Communities along the US-Mexico Border” will be at AOB 201, Department of Social Sciences Colloquium from 4 to 5 p.m.

More about Jepson’s work can be found online.

From Tech Today.


A Village in Bangladesh

Mizanur RahmanGlobal City Presents “A Village In Bangladesh” Today

“A Village in Bangladesh” will be presented by S. M. Mizanur Rahman, today at 5 p.m., in EERC 103.

Mizanur will present the development disaster caused by shrimp farming in his village and how small producers are left out of the economic development of this product. He will also talk about his work in the community and The Motorcycle Project, an idea he developed to provide capital support and planning skills to the local people, which he plans on implementing this summer. He is now pursuing his PhD in Environmental and Energy Policy at Michigan Tech.

From Tech Today.

A Village In Bangladesh

Global City of Michigan Technological University has posted a video of Mizanur’s presentation on their Facebook page.

Mizanur Presentation


Winkler and Schelly on Energy Prize Committee

Energy MapHoughton County Aiming for $5 Million Energy Prize, with Help from Michigan Tech

Georgetown University is offering a $5 million prize for the American community “that leads the way in energy efficiency,” and a Michigan Technological University student thinks there’s no reason Houghton County shouldn’t win.

“There aren’t a lot of small communities with a great technological university in their midst,” said Abhilash Kantamneni, a graduate student in computer science. “I think we have a shot at it.”

The ad hoc committee includes Kantamneni, Ala, county commissioner Tom Tikkanen of Calumet Township, Michigan Tech social sciences faculty members Richelle Winkler and Chelsea Schelly, Lynn Artman of the School of Technology, Melissa Davis of the nonprofit NewPowerTour, Keweenaw Research Center Director Jay Meldrum, Sam Lockwood of the Keweenaw Geothermal Research Group, Kim Stoker of the Western Upper Peninsula Planning and Development Region, Phil Musser, former director of the Keweenaw Economic Development Alliance, and Elmore Reese from Main Street Calumet. Representatives from utility companies UPPCO and SEMCO are participating in the effort, along with energy-conservation businesses and organizations such as Michigan Saves, Efficiency United and BlueTerra.

Read more at Michigan Tech News, by Marcia Goodrich.


FinnForum X and Retrospection & Respect Remember

FinnForum

FinnForum X and Retrospection & Respect Remember the Copper Strike of 1913-14 this Weekend

Retrospection and Respect: the 1913-1914 Mining/Labor Strike Symposium is being held in conjunction with FinnForum X and commemorates the cessation of the 1913-1914 Western Federation of Miners labor strike against copper mining companies in the Copper Country of Upper Michigan.

An exhibit titled “Tumult and Tragedy: Michigan’s 1913–1914 Copper Strike” opens at 8 a.m. Thursday, April 10 on the first floor lobby of the J. Robert Van Pelt and John and Ruanne Opie Library on the Michigan Tech campus.

The Finnish American Heritage Center at Finlandia University recently installed three exhibits. They include a photographic exhibit titled “Rural Reflections: Finnish American Buildings and Landscapes in Michigan’s Copper Country”; a historic photography exhibit named “People, Place and Time: Michigan’s Copper Country Through the Lens of J.W. Nara”; and a pair of lithographs acquired by the National Park Service which were on either side of the Italian Hall stage the night of the infamous Christmas Eve tragedy 100 years ago.

Also on Thursday, Finlandia’s Nordic Film Festival will show To My Son in Spain: Finnish Canadians in the Spanish Civil War. The film’s writer, Saku Pinta, will be there to answer questions.

On Friday, April 11, there will be an open house at the Finnish American Heritage Center and a trolley tour of the Keweenaw.

Saturday, April 12 features a speaker series with both FinnForum X and Retrospection & Respect sessions in Michigan Tech’s Fisher Hall.

Co-sponsors of the event are Michigan Technological University’s Van Pelt and Opie Library, Michigan Technological University  Archives, Copper Country Historical Collections, Friends of the Van Pelt and Opie Library, Departments of Humanities and Social Sciences, and the Alumni Association.  From Finlandia University, the Finnish American Heritage Center and the Finnish American Historical Archives are co-sponsors along with community partners Cranking Graphics, Book Concern Printers, Keweenaw National Historical Park and Advisory Commission.  International support has come from Turku, Finland’s  Institute of Migration and the History Department at the University of Turku.

Read more at Michigan Tech News, by Monica Lester.

Reliving history
Conferences puts copper strike of 1913-14 in international context

Sunday marked the 100th anniversary of the end of the Western Federation of Miners Copper Country strike, and Thursday through Saturday academics from around the region and around the world gathered in Houghton and Hancock for a pair of concurrent conferences that helped mark the strike’s place in history and to consider Finnish and international influences on the American labor movement.

Read more at the Mining Gazette, by Dan Roblee.


MacLennan on Torch Lake Panel Discussion

Portage Library Hosts Environmental Assessment Presentation about Torch Lake

The Portage Lake District Library will host a panel discussion about the “Impacts of Legacy Mining on Torch Lake” on Tuesday, April 22, at 7 p.m.

Michigan Tech faculty members Noel Urban (CEE), Carol MacLennan (SS) and Judith Perlinger (CEE) will give a three-part presentation on Torch Lake and will answer questions from the audience afterwards.

Read more at Tech Today.