Author: College of Engineering

Sue Hill is the Digital Content Manager for the College of Engineering.

Dean’s Teaching Showcase: Luke Bowman

Luke Bowman
Luke Bowman

College of Engineering Dean Janet Callahan has selected Luke Bowman from the Department of Geological and Mining Engineering and Sciences (GMES) as the featured instructor this week in the Deans’ Teaching Showcase.

Bowman will be recognized at an end-of-term luncheon with other spring showcase members and is a candidate for the next CTL Instructional Award Series.

Bowman was selected for his instruction in GE 5260 Scientific Communication. The course enhances graduate students’ oral and written communication skills to help them write scientific proposals, present research at conferences and publish their findings in peer-reviewed literature. It also helps in completing their thesis or dissertation. In the course, students develop a research proposal they are encouraged to submit to the National Science Foundation, Michigan Space Grant Consortium (MSGC) and other agencies. Students conduct a literature review, articulate a research question, engage with their faculty research advisor, and provide and receive feedback. Students also interact with guest speakers who are experts in the field of communicating science to varied audiences. They learn how to effectively talk about their research from engaging professionals whose job it is to make an impactful argument.

“The Scientific Communication course has been an ultimate success story,” said Aleksey Smirnov, GMES department chair. “GMES students have had very high success rates with their MSGC grant submissions.”

“Luke is an amazingly dedicated teacher and effective mentor, who keeps providing instrumental contributions to the advancement of the department’s educational mission, especially in the areas of student recruitment and graduate education,” added Smirnov.

Bowman has co-taught the course with PhD candidate Beth Bartel, who was its teaching assistant the prior two years when the course was taught by Professor John Gierke (GMES). While Bowman leaned on the content and activities developed during prior years, each year the course evolves, drawing from the instructors’ personal experience. Bowman and Bartel were able to efficiently weave in topics close to their research interests in geological hazard communication.

“Luke’s dedication to student success is inspiring and a reason why I chose to attend Michigan Tech,” said PhD student Jacob Murchek. “He and Beth always worked together to provide support and guidance not only in their scientific communication course but in any aspect you would need.”

“Luke has been an extremely important part of my success during my graduate studies,” added MS student Emilie Prey. “Not only did he help me successfully navigate writing for the MSGC in Scientific Communication, he has been introducing me to opportunities unique to this department. He is always there to offer support for absolutely anything related to graduate school.”

“Innovative teaching that has students writing and presenting in their discipline is one of the things that make our graduates so successful,” said Callahan. “Luke’s dedication to students and their success exemplifies how Michigan Tech gives students such a high return on their investment.”

Michigan Space Grant Consortium Awards for 2023-24

NASA Lunabotics
By ProjectManager2015 – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=121940844

A diverse, multitalented group of Michigan Tech students, faculty and staff members has been awarded fellowships and grants totaling an impressive $78,000 from the Michigan Space Grant Consortium (MSGC) for its 2023-24 cycle.

The MSGC, which consists of 52 consortia, is sponsored by NASA. The MSGC promotes awareness, research and education in “space-related science and technology in Michigan.” To achieve this goal, the organization not only funds fellowships and scholarships for students pursuing STEM careers but also financially supports curriculum enhancement and faculty development. 

Michigan Tech undergraduate students who received $4,000 for Faculty Led Fellowships are:

  • Elijah Sierra (mechanical engineering): “Investigation of static electricity effects on conveyance of MTU-LHT-1A through polycarbonate hoppers”
  • Abraham Stone (biological sciences): “Advancing Mycobiocontrol Techniques for Buckthorn Management”

Michigan Tech graduate students who received $5,000 Graduate Fellowships are:

  • Ian Norwood (Physics): “Constraining Frictional Charging on Coarse-Mode Atmospheric Dust Particles”
  • Jacob Novitch (CEGE): “Modeling of Lagoon Wastewater Treatment Systems in Small Communities”
  • Caitlyn Sutherlin (SS) “Understanding Community Connections with Nature in California, El Salvador”
  • Eli Paulen (CFRES): “Elucidating factors controlling stream temperatures in a seasonally snow-covered forested catchment in the Great Lakes Region”
  • Ben Jewell (ME-EM): “Experimental Characterization of Polymers and Polymer Composites Under High Temperature Oxidative Aging”
  • Enid Partika (CEGE): “Uncovering Causes Spatial Variability in Lake Superior Lake Trout PCB Concentrations”
  • Emilie Pray (GMES): “The role of crustal recycling in the evolution of the Bell Creek igneous complex, Marquette County, Michigan”
  • Kyle Wehmanen (KIP): “Human Powered Locomotion on Variable Terrain: Implications for how to Move on Mars”

Michigan Tech faculty and staff members who received $5,000 or more for Hands-On NASA-Oriented Experiences for Student Groups (HONES) and Research Seed Programs:

  • Paul van Susante (ME-EM): HONES — “NASA Lunabotics Competition”
  • Xin Xi (GMES): “The compound extreme climate and dust storms over the Northern Hemisphere midlatitude drylands”
  • Yinan Yuan (CFRES): “Genetic Engineering Novel Regulatory Antisense RNAs for Plant Adaption to Space Environment”

The Graduate School is proud of these students for their outstanding scholarship. These awards highlight the quality of students at Michigan Tech, their innovative work, their leadership potential and the incredible role faculty plays in students’ academic success.

Engineering Students Sweep the Oral Presentations at the 2023 Health Research Institute Forum

Gloved hand filling a tube from a pipette in a lab.

HRI Student Forum Winners Announced

by Health Research Institute

The Health Research Institute (HRI) held their 2023 Student Forum on February 24. The forum featured a poster session and an oral presentation session, which drew participation from 20 students in 10 departments. Judges selected the following winners from each category:

Poster Session

First Place: Gregory Miodonski, Kinesiology and Integrative Physiology
Second Place (tie): Bianca Velez, Biological Sciences
Second Place (tie): Chen Zhao, Applied Computing
Third Place (tie): Emily Washeleski, Biological Sciences
Third Place (tie): Sherry Chen, Kinesiology and Integrative Physiology

Oral Presentations

First Place: Seth Kriz, Chemical Engineering
Second Place (tie): Brennan Vogl, Biomedical Engineering
Second Place (tie): Natalie Nold, Chemical Engineering
Third Place: Roya Bagheri, Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics

Thank you to all of the participants and congratulations to the winners.

For more information on HRI’s student programs and resources, please visit the HRI Student Resources page.

Dean’s Teaching Showcase: Jeana Collins

Jeana Collins
Jeana Collins

Jeana Collins, associate teaching professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering (ChE), has been selected for spring 2023’s Deans’ Teaching Showcase.

Collins will be recognized at an end-of-term event with other showcase members and is a candidate for the CTL Instructional Award Series.

Collins was selected for consistently applying what she has learned in a variety of professional development opportunities to continuously improve her courses. These include attending four National Effective Teaching Institute workshops, an Alan Alda Communication workshop and the Inclusive STEM Teaching Project. They provided Collins with the opportunity to learn a wide variety of teaching techniques and use them to tailor each course according to the subject and students. She especially appreciated the opportunity to interact with faculty from across the country to share experiences and brainstorm ideas for course improvements.

Examples of courses that have been positively impacted by professional development are the required second-year foundational courses. These are important for students to master, so making sure the content is engaging and providing students with multiple learning experiences is important to Collins. As one student said, “I think the way she goes through classes is very helpful, giving us some time to figure it out and also being there to support us if we have questions.”

Collins works with the students to improve courses, often making changes midsemester. Early-term surveys give students an opportunity to check in with how class is going. The follow-on discussion with the class on what can’t change and what can (and will) change is the part that Collins finds the most meaningful. And students appreciate it. One commented, “I really like how you took time out of class to stop and talk with us about how this class is running and ways to improve to make it better overall, thank you for doing this for us!”

“Dr. Collins’ teaching style is student-centric,” said Pradeep Agrawal, ChE’s department chair. “She makes a serious effort to keep students engaged throughout her lectures employing a variety of active teaching tools.”

Last fall, Collins was assigned a new course: CM3450 Computer Aided Problem Solving. Based on the knowledge and experience she gained, she restructured the course to focus on chemical engineering content; within the different content, she covered multiple computer programs. This means that the programs used are seen throughout the semester, showcasing different applications. This was an effective approach that students found very helpful. As one student said, “This class is amazing. I liked how sometimes we’d follow along, but also had independent working days. The assignments and projects were a great way to apply what we learned. So glad I enrolled in this course!”

“Having faculty members who choose to participate in workshops and courses in order to be more effective in the classroom is one of the reasons Michigan Tech graduates such high-quality engineers,” says Janet Callahan, dean of the College of Engineering. “Dr. Jeana Collins exemplifies this and strongly deserves this recognition.”

By the Jackson Center for Teaching and Learning.

SWE Attends WELocal Detroit Conference 2023

Conference room with stage and tables of attendees.

Five student members of the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) section at Michigan Tech and SWE advisor Gretchen Hein (MMET) attended the WELocal Detroit conference, held Saturday and Sunday (February 18–19).

The attending students were SWE President Aerith Cruz (junior, management information systems), seniors Lukas Pyryt (mechanical engineering) and Kathleen Pakenas (biomedical engineering), and second-year students Kathryn Krieger (environmental engineering) and Ella Merklein (biomedical engineering).

At the conference, Krieger and Merklein gave a presentation titled “SWE Section and Engineering Ambassadors Host K-5 Engineering Days.” Hein participated in a panel discussion titled “Journeys in Academia, The Perks and Challenges” with faculty from Kettering University.

“Attending the WELocal conference and presenting on our outreach programs was an empowering experience,” said Krieger. “It was a great opportunity to showcase the incredible work being done by our section and a reminder that by working together, we can make a meaningful impact on the next generation of engineers.”

“Being my first conference, I very much enjoyed attending the WELocal conference,” said Pyryt. “This was a chance for me to truly become an ally for SWE and learn more ways to support this organization. I am very thankful for all connections I gained at this conference, as well as new information gained in sessions helping push more to become a better engineer in the process.”

The section celebrated with the SWE-Wisconsin Professional Section the achievements of Andrea Falasco ’12 (BS mechanical engineering) who was selected as an Emerging Leader in Technology and Engineering (ELiTE). “It was great seeing my SWE friends again and meeting new ones at the conference,” said Falasco. “I am honored to be chosen for one of the New ELiTE awards and am grateful for those who nominated me. I learned a lot at the conference and hope to bring this insight back to work and home.”

The SWE section at MTU thanks our alumnae, corporate sponsors, and the College of Engineering for their support of our section and travel to conferences.

By Gretchen Hein, Advisor, Society of Women Engineers.

Dean’s Teaching Showcase: Pasi Lautala

Pasi Lautala
Pasi Lautala

The College of Engineering and the Department of Civil, Environmental, and Geospatial Engineering (CEGE) are pleased to announce Pasi Lautala as the featured instructor for this week’s Deans’ Teaching Showcase.

Lautala will be recognized at an end-of-term luncheon with other spring showcase members, and is a candidate for the next CTL Instructional Award Series.

Lautala is being honored for excellence in teaching across a 20-year effort focused on railway engineering. Because of his passion for rails as a highly energy-efficient mode for land transportation, he established and now manages Michigan Tech’s railway engineering program. The educational aspects of this program benefit students at Michigan Tech and across the nation.

“Dr. Lautala had a vision of a world-class rail engineering program at Tech. Through steadfast determination, Pasi made that happen,” said College of Engineering Dean Janet Callahan. “Because of Pasi’s trailblazing efforts, Tech students can pursue an undergraduate minor in rail transportation. And those who do are highly sought after for employment by rail companies and their contractors on our continent and beyond.”

In addition to the minor he established, Lautala mentors students in the Rail Engineering Activities Club (REAC) at Michigan Tech, reinforcing their curricular experiences with extracurricular activities. Students interact with rail industry professionals to learn even more about train systems and establish important industry contacts. This club is the inaugural student chapter of the American Railway Engineering and Maintenance-of-Way Association (AREMA), the national organization for rail engineering professionals. That the inaugural student chapter was established at Michigan Tech speaks volumes about Lautala’s impact in railway engineering education.

Lautala has also had an enormous impact across the continent. In 2008, he helped establish the Railroad Engineering Education Symposium (REES) under the auspices of AREMA, which he continues to lead. Its purpose is to expand and encourage railway engineering education throughout North America. In 2015, with the help of the American Public Transportation Association (APTA), this was augmented with the passenger-rail symposium (p-REES) to look at issues particular to transit, commuter and inter-city services. Lautala’s vision has led hundreds of faculty members and dozens of universities to incorporate rail engineering into their educational offerings.

“Dr. Lautala is a visionary in rail education and his impact is significant,” said Audra Morse, chair of CEGE. “I have heard about this work through colleagues and department heads around the country. Our students benefit from Pasi’s passion, technical competence and industry connections. The rail program draws students from all over the country to Michigan Tech.”

Lautala has also worked to develop a pipeline of students passionate about rail as an energy-efficient mode of transportation through Michigan Tech’s summer youth program. This has led to the “Tracks to the Future” collaboration with University of Illinois and Penn State Altoona, which, with funding from the Federal Railroad Administration, expands the program and includes these other campuses.

For his impact on education at Michigan Tech and beyond, the College of Engineering is honored to recognize Pasi Lautala in the Deans’ Teaching Showcase.

Engineering Ambassadors and SWE Host Engineering Day on MLK Day 2023

MLK Day of Service graphic.

On Martin Luther King Jr. Day, the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) and Engineering Ambassadors (EA) hosted an Engineering Day at Barkell Elementary in Hancock, Michigan. Students from SWE, EA, Tau Beta Pi and Circle K “made it a day on, not a day off” through introducing kindergarten through fifth grade students to engineering.

Kindergarten and first grade students learned about buoyancy and stability through designing a constructing a foil boat to hold a load. Second and third grade students learned about potential and kinetic energy as they designed and constructed roller coasters for marbles. The fourth and fifth graders were introduced to series circuits as they constructed a BouncyBot.

We thank the Tech students for volunteering and the Barkell Elementary students for their enthusiasm and willingness to learn.

By Jaclyn Johnson, Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics and Gretchen Hein, Manufacturing and Mechanical Engineering Technology.

Dean’s Teaching Showcase: Tony Pinar

Tony Pinar
Tony Pinar

College of Engineering Dean Janet Callahan has selected Associate Teaching Professor Anthony (Tony) Pinar as the first member of this spring’s Deans’ Teaching Showcase.

Pinar will be recognized at an end-of-term luncheon with other spring showcase members, and is a candidate for the next CTL Instructional Award Series.

Capstone design in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), the second-largest department in the College of Engineering, is a complex ecology formed of students, the Enterprise Program office, industry partners, faculty subject matter experts and other departments’ capstone programs. It takes someone very special to be able to balance the interests of all those constituents and maintain a robust educational experience for every possible combination of project, team and sponsor. Pinar manages it with grace and a resolute commitment to excellence. “Almost everything about the class was amazing,” one student commented. “Honestly, I believe this may be the best formatted, run and taught class I’ve taken so far at Tech.” That’s high praise from a tough audience.

The strategy Pinar takes with the ECE Senior Design applies a common framework of tasks and deliverables across all Senior Design teams and allows for relatively autonomous advisor roles. This means that all teams have overall similar capstone experiences, but faculty advisors are able to coordinate, manage and assess their teams using their own individual styles. The framework stresses the importance of objective decision-making, following appropriate engineering standards and communicating engineering problems to other engineers. The common framework also helps ensure that the program meets external assessment criteria (e.g., ABET) and also provides a mechanism for the department to assess a large number of ECE students for program improvement. Jin Choi, ECE department chair, said: “We are proud of the improvements Tony has made to make this a more effective program. The students have really benefited.”

Projects in Senior Design generally challenge the students’ technical skills. Pinar coordinates the ongoing relationships with our industry sponsors and manages expectations when necessary. He has a wealth of industry experience that provides context for the students and informs his individual coaching for students as they navigate the transition between communicating with peers and communicating in a professional environment as engineers. Teams are required to present several times throughout the yearlong project. Pinar has crafted a common rubric that allows faculty, staff and industry sponsors to evaluate the students’ technical approach as well as individual presentation skills. This provides an opportunity for meaningful feedback from a variety of perspectives. This increases the quality of our students’ technical presentation skills, and their communication skills when discussing technical topics with fellow engineers. This quality increase has been noted by our own internal faculty advisors and by members on our External Advisory Committee.

Callahan, in closing, stated: “Dr. Pinar’s hard work and expertise prepares our students for excellence. Through his efforts our graduates are well prepared not only to technically excel, but also to communicate within and beyond their team beginning from the first position they hold.”

Engineering Alumni Activity Spring 2023

Mike Rasner
Mike Rasner

UPWord mentioned Michigan Tech in a story about Advanced Blending Solutions, a custom machine manufacturing company in Wallace, Wisconsin, housed in the same building where owner and CEO Mike Rasner ’95 (BS Electrical Engineering) attended elementary school. ABS is grateful to be a part of an area with many other large manufacturing and engineering employers, providing a fruitful workforce. The company’s leading work with the fibers market, particularly carpeting made from recycled PET bottles, has also garnered recognition from the recycling industry.

Yahoo! Finance and the Assay ran a profile of Robert Leonardson ’63 ’66 (BS Geological Engineering, MS Geology), who recently joined NuLegacy Gold’s gold discovery team. Leonardson’s career spans over 55 years across the Western United States, Eastern Canada, and Chile, exploring for and mining numerous commodities including gold, silver, platinum, base metals, and iron ore for Anaconda, Molycorp and Barrick Gold Corp.

Arjang Roshan-Rouz
Arjang Roshan-Rouz

Grinding & Surface FinishingIndustrial Distribution and Gear Technology mentioned Michigan Tech in stories about the new CEO of Weiler Abrasives Group: Arjang Roshan-Rouz ’92 (BS Electrical Engineering). Arjang “AJ” Roshan-Rouz brings significant experience in leading a global organisation and will lead Weiler Abrasives into a new chapter of growth. As CEO, his job responsibilities include developing and executing strategy, implementing operating plans congruent with the company’s long-range plan.

Carin Ramirez
Carin Ramirez

Mile High CRE mentioned Michigan Tech in coverage of Carin Ramirez ’98 (BEng Geological/Geophysical Engineering) joining construction and family law firm McConaughy & Sarkissian, P.C. of Colorado as special counsel. Ramirez brings 12 years of legal experience to the firm and focuses her practice on civil litigation with an emphasis on defending construction defect lawsuits on behalf of corporate and individual clients including developers, general contractors and other construction professionals.

Gari Mayberry
Gari Mayberry

Discover Magazine mentioned Michigan Tech in a story taking a look at the evolution of women in volcanology. Gari Mayberry ’99 (MS Geology) was quoted in the story. Mayberry is currently a U.S. Geological Survey natural hazards and disaster risk reduction team lead and geoscience advisor. She leads international natural hazard-related assistance and helps to manage the USAID-USGS Volcano Disaster Assistance Program and Earthquake Disaster Assistance Team.

Angela Xydis
Angela Xydis

SAE International published a “Women in Mobility Spotlight” blog post featuring Angela Xydis ’20 (BS Mechanical Engineering), who is now a program manager for software defined vehicles at General Motors and a Concept Design event captain for the AutoDrive ChallengeTM II. AutoDrive is a collegiate competition tasking university teams to develop and demonstrate a full autonomous driving passenger vehicle, sponsored by SAE International and General Motors.

Stuart Pann
Stuart Pann

Yahoo! Finance covered Intel’s appointment of Stuart Pann ’81 (BS Electrical Engineering) as head of Intel Foundry Services. The story ran in more than 40 tech industry and business publications in the U.S. Pann will drive continued growth for IFS and its differentiated systems foundry offering, which goes beyond traditional wafer fabrication to include packaging, chiplet standards and software, as well as U.S.- and Europe-based capacity.

Melissa and Travis Marti
Melissa and Travis Marti

Ag Update profiled 2023 Wisconsin Outstanding Young Farmer award winners Melissa ’05 (BS Mathematics) and Travis Marti ’06 (BS Mechanical Engineering) in a story about how their STEM skills have helped them make their dairy and farming business near Vesper, Wisconsin, a success. With mechanical-engineering and mathematics degrees, together the two have heads for numbers and details. That shows in their 535-head dairy operation and 1,200-acre farming business near Vesper, said Dr. John Borzillo, their veterinarian.

Jennifer Hellberg
Jennifer Hellberg

Photonics Online and Novus Light Technologies Today mentioned Michigan Tech in stories about Jennifer Hellberg ’97 (BS Environmental Engineering) being appointed division vice president, business unit manager, at Zygo, which works with global organizations and sets standards by which the metrology and optics industries judge themselves. Prior to her nomination to Zygo, Hellberg was most recently Vice President & General Manager with Thermo Fisher Scientific based in Wisconsin, where her focus was on increasing responsibility in operational excellence and general management.

Michael Quinnell
Michael Quinnell

Civil + Structural Engineer Magazine ran a profile of professional engineer Michael Quinnell ’91 (BS Mechanical Engineering), who is joining planning, engineering and program management firm LAN as a senior project manager. Quinnell is a noted engineer with experience in managing water supply facilities, ground storage tanks, large diameter pipelines and stormwater pump stations.

George Miller
George Miller

The JAX Chamber of northeast Florida published a news release mentioning the promotion of George Miller ’99 (BS Civil Engineering) to executive vice president of construction engineering and inspection for England-Thims & Miller Inc. During his career, Miller has completed and led more than $1 billion in complex roadway, bridge and aviation projects across the Southeast.

Kevin Tomsovic
Kevin Tomsovic

Civil + Structural Engineer Magazine ran a story on the election of Kevin Tomsovic ’82 (BS Electrical Engineering) to the National Academy of Engineering. Tomsovic is a professor at the University of Tennessee. Tomsovic’s research focuses on power system computational methods and power engineering education. Tomsovic has served as the Kyushu Electric Endowed Chair for Advanced Technology for Electrical Energy at Kumamoto University in Japan and was the National Science Foundation program director of the Electrical and Communications Systems Division of the Engineering Directorate.

Andrew Dohm
Andrew Dohm

Leader Publications of southwest Michigan ran a profile of Michigan Tech alum Andrew Dohm ’96 (BS Mechanical Engineering), a science and math instructor at Southwestern Michigan College. Dohm always liked the process of education and learning from faculty members who were degreed professionals who either taught part-time or who switched from industry to teaching. He pursued mechanical engineering and hired into the automotive industry with Chrysler.

Leo Evans
Leo Evans

The Cañon City Daily Record mentioned Michigan Tech in a story about Cañon City’s new public works director, Leo Evans ’04 (civil engineering). Evans obtained his bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from Michigan Technological University and, shortly afterward, went to work for the Michigan Department of Transportation, where he spent nearly 15 years. For five years, he was the public works director and city engineer for the City of Muskegon.

Julie (Varichak) Marinucci
Julie (Varichak) Marinucci

Business North mentioned Michigan Tech in a story about four new trustees appointed to the board of trustees for Blandin Foundation. Among them is Julie (Varichak) Marinucci ’02 (BS mining engineering). Marinucci of Hibbing understands Minnesota’s Iron Range communities and mining industry. She will help expand the foundation’s understanding of community wealth building through energy transition. As the current St. Louis County lands and minerals director, she manages more than 900,000 acres of public land used by mining and timber companies, recreation communities, and local governments. Hometown Focus in northern Minnesota also quoted Marinucci in a story about women who are leaders in minerals, mining and related fields.

Randy Vaas
Randy Vaas

Attorney Intel included MTU alumnus Randy Vaas ’84 (B. electrical engineering), a patent attorney at Google, in its 2023 list of notable Michigan attorneys. Before joining Google, Vaas spent over 23 years at Motorola, where he was most recently a Lead Patent Operations Counsel for mobile devices.

Mike Olosky
Mike Olosky

Civil + Structural Engineer ran a press release announcing Michigan Tech alum Mike Olosky ’91 (mechanical engineering) as the new CEO of Simpson Strong-Tie. Prior to joining Simpson, Olosky spent more than 22 years in numerous leadership positions at Henkel. He most recently served as President, Henkel North America and Senior Corporate Vice President and Head of the Electronics and Industrial Division.

Ryan Bauman
Ryan Bauman

Congratulations to alumnus Ryan Bauman ’07 (civil engineering) for being named an ENR Midwest Top Young Professional. The Engineering News-Record (ENR) recognized 20 individuals in the region under the age of 40 — all young leaders in design and construction who are helping shape the industry’s future. Bauman is a transit section manager at HDR Engineering Inc. in St. Louis Park, Minnesota. He was selected because he reshapes communities through public transportation access.

Peter Ray
Peter Ray

Railway Age covered the retirement of Peter Ray (civil engineering) as vice president, engineering, of Indiana Rail Road (INRD). In 2006, Ray joined INRD as General Manger, Engineering, and was elevated to Vice President, Engineering in 2009. Among his achievements are the 500-mile railroad serving southwest Indiana and eastern Illinois.

Mark Daavettila ’09 (civil engineering) was quoted by the Mining Journal in a story covering his appointment as department of public works director and city engineer in Negaunee, Michigan. Daavettila holds a bachelor of science degree in civil engineering from MTU and has 11 years of experience working in the civil engineering field. He is a licensed professional engineer in Michigan and recently worked for Upper Peninsula Engineers and Architects.

Tasha Stoiber
Tasha Stoiber

Tasha Stoiber ’00 (BS, environmental engineering; BS, biological sciences) was a guest on ABC 2 News of Green Bay, Wisconsin. Stoiber joined the broadcast virtually to discuss an environmental report estimating that eating one freshwater fish is equivalent to drinking a month’s worth of forever chemicals in water. Stoiber is a senior scientist for the Environmental Working Group in San Francisco, California, and co-authored the report. She researches contaminants in water, indoor air pollution, and chemicals in consumer products.

Karen Swager
Karen Swager

Yahoo! Finance covered the appointment of Karen Swager ’92 ’94 (B.S., M.S., metallurgical engineering) to the SSR Mining Inc. Board of Directors. She is currently the senior vice president, supply chain, at the Mosaic Company. Swager brings nearly three decades of mining experience to SSR Mining with expertise in operations, supply chain management and Environment, Health and Safety. She is a member of the Department of Chemical Engineering’s Distinguished Academy.

Phil Rausch
Phil Rausch

North American Clean Energy covered the appointment of Phil Rausch ’08 (chemical engineering) as Hemlock Semiconductor’s new senior director of commercial sales. He supported HSC’s rapid growth in several capacities, including manufacturing team leader, economic evaluator and finance analyst, project engineering manager and business development manager. Rausch will lead the HSC sales team across all four market-facing segments of HSC’s business: solar, semiconductors, advanced energy storage, and silicon-based chemicals.

Sally Heidtke
Sally Heidtke

A book written by Sally Heidtke ’81 (chemical engineering) was the subject of a story in the Iron Mountain Daily News. The book “Be Infinite: Access Your Unimagined Potential,” is a guide to living a richer, deeper life. Heidtke worked as a manager in the engineering field for 25 years before starting a career in intuitive services and guidance.

Craig Tester
Craig Tester

Distractify mentioned Michigan Tech in a story about the net worth of “The Curse of Oak Island” star Craig Tester, who earned a bachelor’s in mechanical engineering from MTU. In addition to his work in the television industry, Craig is a successful entrepreneur and engineer, owning stakes in several companies throughout his time-honored career. From Terra Energy to Oak Island Tours Inc. to Heritage Sustainable Energy, eclectic engineering business ventures heavily inform Craig’s multi-million-dollar net worth.

Related

Engineering Alumni Activity Fall 2022

Joint ROTC Commissioning Ceremony December 17

Spring 2019 commencement ceremony with cadets on stage.

The Air Force and Army ROTC invite you to the Fall 2022 Commissioning Ceremony on Saturday (Dec. 17) at 7:30 a.m. at the Rozsa Center.

This semester we have three Air Force cadets and five Army cadets commissioning.

Those commissioning are from the following programs:

Civil Engineering | Environmental Engineering | Mathematics | Mechanical Engineering

We will also be streaming the ceremony if you prefer to watch it live on YouTube.