Tag: ECE

Stories about Electrical and Computer Engineering.

Joint ROTC Commissioning Ceremony April 26, 2024

Cadets and officers on stage for the ceremony.

The Air Force and Army ROTC invite you to the Spring 2024 Commissioning Ceremony on Friday (April 26) at 7 p.m. at the Rozsa Center.

This semester, we have 10 Air Force cadets and four Army cadets commissioning. Those commissioning are from the following programs:

Chemical Engineering | Chemistry | Civil Engineering | Computer Science | Electrical Engineering | Environmental Engineering | Mechanical Engineering | Mining Engineering | Molecular Biology

By Air Force and Army ROTC.

SWE Hosts Girl Scout Engineering Days 2024 at MTU and Grand Rapids

NASA Earth Observatory satellite image of the Upper Peninsula and northern Wisconsin.

Girl Scouts Engineering Day at MTU

On March 9, the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) section at Michigan Tech hosted their annual Girl Scouts Engineering Day for over 35 scouts in the Upper Peninsula and northern Wisconsin.

The Brownies and Daisies “Molded the Future,” using Play-Doh to create robotic gripper designs to pick up unique shapes. The scouts then used a digital scanner to see what their models looked like on a computer and learned about the 3D printing process. This session was led by Shane Oberloier, assistant teaching professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE).

The Juniors and Cadettes participated in sessions sponsored by MTU’s Applied Cognitive Science and Human Factors (ACSHF) program and ECE. In one session, the scouts learned about human factors under the guidance of Kelly Steelman, chair and associate professor in the Department of Cognitive and Learning Sciences (CLS), while the second session, “FANtastic Controllers,” focused on computer programming, microcontrollers and circuit building. The scouts assembled a circuit that included an Arduino board, a power supply module, a logic chip and a DC motor to create a working fan. Next, they engaged in programming the circuit, gaining insights into the fundamentals of computer science and serial communication.

To make this event successful, Tech students from Blue Marble Security Enterprise and the Open Source Hardware Enterprise volunteered. SWE appreciates the support we received from ACSHF and ECE. Planning has already begun for the 2025 Girl Scout event!

Engineering Days in Niles and Grand Rapids

SWE members Tory Cantrell (mechanical engineering) and Carsyn Boggio (environmental engineering), ECE students Skyler Brawley (computer engineering) and Emily Roth (electrical engineering), and SWENexter Jenna Beaudoin, a Lake Linden-Hubbell High School senior, worked with Girl Scouts and Ring Lardner Middle School students in Niles, Michigan, on April 6. Sophie Owen ’22 (B.S. Electrical Engineering) helped the students construct their circuits.

In Grand Rapids, Michigan, Amy (Palmgren) Rokos ’08 (B.S. Computer Engineering) joined us and helped with the event. Lilly, a fourth grader and Junior Girl Scout, commented, “I liked the programing. I had to do math, but it was fun! I’m excited to do more things with my kit at home.” (Every participant not only used components, but was given an Arduino kit to take home.)

SWE sends a huge shoutout to Brawley and Beaudoin, who worked hard to design this integrated outreach activity, and to academic advisor Lauren Huested (ECE), who obtained the funding for this trip through a grant from the Michigan Economic Development Corporation. The funds needed to be used on K-12 outreach that would teach students about EE concepts (specifically motors), making the Arduino/motorized fan kit a perfect fit!

Thanks to our vice president for Global Campus and continuing education, David Lawrence, who permitted us to use the grant funding, we were able to pay for the cost of supplies and travel for the events.

SWE also thanks the College of Engineering and the ECE department for their support, along with the CLS department. Outreach events are exciting opportunities for us to interact with future Michigan Tech Huskies!

By Jaclyn Johnson and Gretchen Hein, Advisors, Society of Women Engineers.

Michigan Space Grant Consortium Awardees for 2024–2025

NASA Lunabotics experiment with moon dust.

A diverse, multitalented group of Michigan Tech students and faculty have been awarded fellowships and grants totaling an impressive $71,728 from the Michigan Space Grant Consortium (MSGC) for its 2024-25 cycle.

The MSGC, which consists of 52 consortia, is sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The MSGC promotes awareness, research and education in “space-related science and technology in Michigan.” To achieve this goal, the organization not only funds fellowships and scholarships for students pursuing STEM careers but also financially supports curriculum enhancement and faculty development.

Michigan Tech Undergraduate Students Who Received $4,000 for Faculty Led Fellowships

  • Grace Hoeppner (biomedical engineering): “Effects of Microgravity on Predisposing Factors for Atrial Fibrillation Thrombosis Risk”
  • Grace Murray (social sciences): “Cultivating Healthy Communities: A Mixed-Methods Analysis of Female Eponyms in Heirloom Plant Varieties and their Impacts in Community Food Networks”

Michigan Tech Graduate Students Who Received $5,000 Graduate Fellowships

  • Alexander Apostle (Chem): “Improved Synthesis and Application of Human Telomeres”
  • Matthew Beals (ME-EM): “Advancing Adaptive Aerostructures: Utilizing Steady-State Traveling Waves for Drag Reduction and Sustainable Aviation”
  • Grady Boyle (CFRES): “Using High Resolution Multitemporal Imagery for Ash Inventory and EAB Invasion Mapping in the Upper Great Lakes Region”
  • Jacob Jackson (BioMed): “Cell-Specific Adaptive Deep Brain Stimulation in the Subthalamic Nucleus of a Parkinson’s Rat Model”
  • Benjamin Mohrhardt (ECE): “Investigating and Predicting the Formation of Toxic Nitrogenous Byproducts from Phenolic Compounds in the Presence of Nitrate under Far-UVC Irradiation from KrCl* Excilamps”
  • Ian Norwood (Physics): ”Constraining Frictional Charging on Coarse-Mode Atmospheric Dust Particles”
  • Eleanor Serocki (CFRES): ”Estimating Trace Gas Flux Dynamics in Boreal Wetlands”
  • Tanner Sether (Physics): ”Toward a Deep Learning Approach for Fast Galaxy Catalog Generation”
  • Matthew Sisson (MSE): ”Micromagnetism of Self-Assembled FeSi2 Nanoislands”
  • Caitlyn Sutherlin (SS): ”Community- and Nature-Led Adaptation in El Salvador”
  • Kyle Wehmanen (KIP): ”Human Powered Locomotion on Variable Terrain: a Continuing Investigation for how to Move on Mars”

Michigan Tech Faculty and Staff Members Who Received $5,000 or More for Hands-On NASA-Oriented Experiences for Student Groups (HONES) or Research Seed Grants

The Graduate School is proud of these students for their outstanding scholarship. These awards highlight the quality of students at Michigan Tech, their innovative work, their leadership potential and the incredible role played by faculty in students’ academic success.

Michigan Tech SWE Section, ME-EM Researchers Judge Inventions at Baraga Elementary

Baraga Elementary School students inventions include: Catnip Paw Covers. Shoes that would grow as the wearer grew. Kai’s Numbing Hair Gel. Hover car that would move based on the placement of magnets in the road. Pollution Vacuum Filtering Device. And many more!
The Henry Ford Invention Convention Worldwide

On February 15, 2024, the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) and the MTU Waste Valorization Research Group volunteered to judge third- through fifth-grade Invention Convention projects at Baraga Elementary School.

Invention Convention Worldwide is a K-12 invention education program that teaches students problem-identification, problem-solving, entrepreneurship and creativity skills and builds confidence in invention, innovation and entrepreneurship for life. Prior to the competition, the Baraga students developed inventions that would impact their community.

SWE Advisor Gretchen Hein and members Skyler Brawley (senior, computer engineering) and Maci Dostaler (junior, software engineering) paired up with Assistant Teaching Professor Fei Long (ME-EM) and Research Engineers Shiying Cai and Adeyinka Adekunle (both ME-EM) to evaluate the inventions. The judges were impressed with the students’ excitement when describing their projects and the range of creative solutions.

The inventions included:

  • Snow plow for a strider bike
  • Snow plow for a remote controlled car
  • Motorized fishing lure that moved in the water
  • Shoes that would grow as the wearer grew
  • Multistation pencil sharpener
  • Hover car that would move based on the placement of magnets in the road
  • Pollution Vacuum Filtering Device
  • Basket Land board game
  • Handy Dandy Light Switch
  • Magic Pen 55
  • Spectacular Butter Lipstick
  • Upside Down gaming controller accessory for kids
  • Phone Holder 5000
  • Catnap Paw Covers
  • Keep-Away Can to keep dogs away from the trash can
  • Safari board game
  • Kai’s Numbing Hair Gel

The judges thank the teachers and staff, along with the enthusiastic student inventors, for inviting us to look over and judge at the Invention Convention. SWE and the MTU Waste Valorization Research Group would enjoy returning to evaluate projects next year.

MTUengineering: By Parents, for Parents

“The opportunity to dive deep into technology and grow as a person cannot be directly measured,” says Mark Gryzwa. “However, you can see it in the people that graduate from MTU and the companies that hire them.”

Are you the parent of a prospective student? Want to learn more about Michigan Tech from other parents’ perspectives? Read on…

Mark Gryzwa lives in Woodbury, Minnesota. He works as vice president of research and development for Barologics, Inc, an early stage medical device company developing neuromodulation for the treatment of hypertension. His son, Michael, is a 2018 graduate of Michigan Tech.

Why did your son choose Michigan Tech?

Michael toured many of the well-known Midwest colleges in Minnesota, Iowa, North Dakota, before his senior year of high school. Nothing really stood out to him as “his kind of place”. After our tour of Michigan Tech, we got in the car and he stated, “This is where I’m going!” Beyond the education, he was struck by the town, the campus, and was especially excited about the ability to snowboard frequently, which he did.

What makes Michigan Tech unique?

As a parent and alum, I’m very aware of the academic rigor that MTU students encounter. One of my favorite high school teachers was fond of saying, “Algebra is NOT a spectator sport.” He meant you must dig in and do the work. An MTU education is the same. The rigor is known throughout industry and MTU graduates are sought after for knowing how to do the work. Compared to other higher education, the return on investment for an MTU degree is great. MTU also has a strong industry reputation for developing hard-working professionals.

Beyond the education, the life lessons and community building that occurs is hard to duplicate by other universities. Being a smaller campus in a somewhat distant area creates a unique opportunity for students. The students quickly form bonds over even simple tasks like a ride to get groceries. I cannot imagine a city more welcoming and supportive to students than Houghton.

There are just so many areas where students can find their niche at MTU. It’s funny, but both my son and I at one point said of the MTU community, “These are my people!” The educational rigor and challenges of many inches of snow make for strong, sharing individuals.

Tell us about your son and his time at Michigan Tech.

Michael started at MTU in 2013 as an electrical engineer. After the first semester, he chose to switch majors to Computer Engineering. After his third year he started a summer internship at Medtronic in Minnesota. He returned to another division within the company after year four. Following graduation in 2018, he was hired as a full-time engineer at Medtronic. He’s currently working on the team that develops cell phone apps to talk to pacemakers and send that data to a patient’s physician.

Any advice for parents?

Encourage your student to take advantage of all MTU has to offer. Join the Huskies Pep Band, watch hockey, learn to skate, join the Memorial Union Board, snowboard, hike, bike, go to Copper Harbor, find an agate, find a Yooperlite, see a waterfall, play broomball, have a pasty, make lifelong friends! Find your thing!

Any advice for students?

Work hard, pick a career that interests you, and most importantly—attend every career fair that you can.

Anything else to share?

I have a lot of passion for MTU. The opportunity to dive deep into technology and grow as a person cannot be directly measured. However, you can see it in the people that graduate from MTU and the companies that hire them. MTU’s smaller class sizes and its focus on hands-on learning make for highly sought after engineers.

Mark Gryzwa earned his own bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering at Michigan Tech in 1989. Learn more in his Michigan Tech Alumni Profile.

https://www.mtu.edu/alumni/recognition/profiles/gryzwa-mark.html

Free Lunabotics Exploration for Middle and High School Students Coming Up on Saturday, Feb. 17

Multiplanetary INnovation Enterprise (MINE) team at Michigan Tech
Learn more about MINE at Michigan Tech.

Michigan Tech’s Multiplanetary INnovation Enterprise (MINE) team will host a free STEM engagement event for middle and high school students on Saturday (Feb. 17) from 1-5 p.m. in Fisher 133. Programming experience is not required. Participants will learn about the challenges associated with robotics in lunar environments, and the MINE team will share their experiences building robots for NASA’s Lunabotics Challenge. Following, students will engage in hands-on activities, including programming activities with Zumi robots.

Michigan Tech undergraduate students John Dagg (mechanical engineering) and Ben Bistline (computer engineering) are developing the Zumi robot cars and activities for the event. They are part of the Zumi Undergraduate Research Group (ZURG), which is advised by faculty member Leo Ureel, Department of Computer Science.

Students in the Multiplanetary INnovation Enterprise (MINE) seek to design, test, and implement robotic technologies for extracting and using local resources, construction, and characterization in extreme environments. These environments currently include Lunar, Martian, and flooded subterranean environments on Earth.

MINE’s Lunabotics Rover enjoys a day at the beach, following an intensive NASA Lunabotics competition event.

The event is presented as part of the MINE Enterprise team’s participation in NASA’s Lunabotics Challenge. The team is advised by Mechanical Engineering Professor Paul van Susante, whose lab on campus is called Huskyworks.

Enterprise at Michigan Tech is when students—of any major—work in teams on real projects, with real clients, in an environment that’s more like a business than a classroom. With coaching and guidance from faculty mentors, Michigan Tech’s 26 Enterprise teams work to invent products, provide services, and pioneer solutions. Students can join an Enterprise team as early as their first year in college.

Read more about Saturday’s free event on the Computing news blog.

Hope to see you there!

“Meet Zumi, the car that learns as you learn,” by Robolink

Dean’s Teaching Showcase: Kit Cischke

Kit Cischke
Kit Cischke

College of Engineering Dean Audra Morse has selected Christopher (Kit) Cischke, teaching professor from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), as the first featured instructor in the spring 2024 Deans’ Teaching Showcase. Cischke will be recognized at an end-of-term event with other showcase members and is a candidate for the CTL Instructional Award Series.

In a departure from traditional grading systems, Cischke has transformed the educational landscape in EE3173 Hardware/Software System Integration by introducing “specifications grading,” an approach that establishes a clear passing threshold for understanding, eliminating the complexities associated with point-based grading. Students embraced the emphasis on comprehension over point accumulation, leading to positive feedback. One student said, “The grading style was super helpful because it motivated me to find learning objectives whenever I did assignments.” Another commented, “The lecture format, grading style and assignment structure all felt really good to me and helped my success in the class this semester.”

Under Cischke’s guidance, hands-on experiential learning has experienced another innovative improvement. From in-class code examples using simulators and small “Zumo Robots,” to the introduction of advanced-level courses with real-world applications like the multi2sim simulator, he consistently emphasizes the relevance of learned skills in professional settings. A highlight is the launch of a revised Computer Organization course featuring intensive Verilog design assignments, showcasing his dedication to fostering creativity and investigation among students.

Beyond transforming grading methods and reshaping hands-on experiential learning, Cischke has implemented concept maps as a tool to enhance the learning experience. Each class period begins with a reminder of how the day’s material aligns with broader course objectives, reflecting a commitment to refining teaching practices for optimal learning outcomes. Cischke is dedicated to proving the efficacy of concept maps in engineering education. “Professor Cischke is an exemplary role model as an instructor. He’s created an inspiring and dynamic learning environment for students in the electrical, computer and robotics engineering programs,” said Jin Choi, ECE chair.

Participation in a KEEN workshop focusing on the entrepreneurial mindset has added another layer to Cischke’s teaching philosophy. The resulting assignment engaged students in a creative project related to a restaurant’s soda fountain, demonstrating his ability to seamlessly blend innovation, entrepreneurship and technical skills in the classroom.

Cischke’s commitment to fostering inclusive student-teacher relationships is also noteworthy. Encouraging students to locate his office and make a simple human connection at the start of each semester has created a welcoming environment and made students strongly feel a sense of belonging. Collaborative debugging sessions, lively discussions about student projects and markings on his office whiteboard all reflect his open commitment to student success and sense of belonging.

Morse also commended Cischke: “His innovative teaching methods underscore his transformative impact on his student’s experience. His commitment to student-centered learning, hands-on experiences and fostering meaningful connections exemplifies the spirit of excellence in teaching that we want to showcase.”

MTU Undergraduate Student Miranda Meyers Presents at DMC 2023 in Nashville

Michigan Tech ECE student Miranda Meyers

Miranda Meyers, an electrical engineering undergraduate student at Michigan Technological University, recently presented at the 2023 Defense Manufacturing Conference (DMC) in Nashville, Tennessee, which took place December 11-14. Her presentation was titled “Embedded Component Circuit Design.”

Meyers has spent the past few years working on campus as an undergraduate researcher in the lab of Christopher Middlebrook, a professor of electrical and computer engineering.

“I am always completely thrilled after a participant comments ‘Your graduate student did a fantastic job presenting her research. How long has she been in grad school?,'” says Middlebrook. “I love the smile on their faces when I tell them ‘thank you, but she is still an undergraduate student.'”

DMC is the nation’s annual forum for enhancing and leveraging the efforts of engineers, managers, technology leaders, scientists, and policy makers across the defense manufacturing industrial base. About 1,000 attendees are primarily government and industry participants, with a smaller complement from academia.

Michigan Tech electrical engineering undergraduate student Miranda Meyers presents at DMC in Nashville, Tennessee, last week.

As an undergraduate researcher, Meyers works to develop, design and manufacture circuit boards using UV laser technology. She uses Altium circuit design software to create unique and specific circuit boards, and analyzes results using MATLAB and Mathematica. She also assists in teaching a PCB manufacturing class.

Meyers is also a member of MINE, the Michigan Tech Multiplanetary INnovation Enterprise, a team of students who design, test, and implement robotic technologies for extracting and using local resources, construction, and characterization in extreme environments.

The DMC is jointly conducted by the Joint Defense Manufacturing Technology Panel (JDMTP) and coordinated through the event organizer, ARCTOS. The JDMTP, executed under the authorities outlined in title 10 of U.S. Code § 4842 serves to ensure coordination and collaboration across the Department of Defense Manufacturing Technology (DoD ManTech) Program. The service and agency ManTech programs primary purpose is to further the national security objectives outlined in title 10 of U.S. Code § 4841.

Joint ROTC Commissioning Ceremony December 15, 2023

Army ROTC Fall Commissioning group on stage.

The Air Force and Army ROTC invite you to the Fall 2023 Commissioning Ceremony on Friday (Dec. 15) at 7 p.m. at the Rozsa Center.

This semester, we have one Air Force cadet and eight Army cadets commissioning.

Those commissioning are from the following programs:

Accounting & Data Analytics | Chemistry | Computer Engineering | Electrical Engineering | Materials Science and Engineering | Management | Mechanical Engineering

We will also be streaming the ceremony if you prefer to watch it live on YouTube.

By Air Force and Army ROTC.

MTU Engineering Welcomes 18 New Faculty Members

The College is honored to welcome 18 new faculty members this fall. They bring a range of expertise among seven multidisciplinary research areas: Energy and Sustainability, Advanced Manufacturing, Autonomy and Mobility, Engineering Infrastructure, Engineering for Health, Space and Aerospace, and Navigating our Environment.

Department of Civil, Environmental, and Geospatial Engineering

Quang Tran

Dr. Quang Tran joins the faculty as an assistant professor. He comes to Michigan Tech from Harvard Medical School, Harvard affiliated hospitals, and the UIUC Bioacoustics Research Lab, where he dedicated three years to postdoctoral research. Dr. Tran earned a PhD in Civil Engineering at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, an MS in Civil and Environmental Engineering at California State University, Fullerton, and a BS in Industrial and System Engineering at Ho Chi Minh University of Technology, Vietnam. His research focuses on non-invasive ultrasound for material characterization applications in civil engineering and biomedical fields, diagnosing and monitoring the health of infrastructures and humans.

Ishi Keenum

Dr. Ishi Keenum joins the faculty as an assistant professor. She comes to Michigan Tech from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), where she completed postdoctoral research. She earned a BS in at the University of Michigan, and an MS and PhD at Virginia Tech, all in Environmental Engineering. Keenum serves as the lead of the bioinformatic working group for the International Microbiome and Multi’Omics Standards Alliance (IMMSA). Her research is focused on the dissemination and treatment of antibiotic resistance through wastewater and water systems, and the microbiology of water systems.

Bo Xiao

Dr. Bo Xiao joins the faculty as assistant professor. He comes to Michigan Tech from Hong Kong Polytechnic University, where he worked as a research assistant professor. He earned a BEng in Civil Engineering at Xi’an University of Architecture and Technology in China, an MS from Concordia University in Canada, and a PhD at the University of Alberta, Canada. His research seeks to advance the digital transformation of the construction industry by adopting automated technologies, including artificial intelligence (AI), robotics, and digital twinning, for modular construction, as well as visual monitoring of construction sites.

Mazi Erfani

Dr. Mazi Erfani joins the faculty as an assistant professor. He comes to Michigan Tech from the University of Maryland, College Park, where he earned a PhD in Civil Engineering. He earned a BS in Civil Engineering and MSc, in Construction Engineering and Management at the University of Tehran in Iran. His research interests include data-driven infrastructure management, Smart construction, equity and diversity, risk management, text analytics and natural language processing, and AI modeling.

Kerri Sleeman

Kerri Sleeman joins the faculty as a professor of practice. After working in the automotive and construction industries as an engineer she joined Michigan Tech staff, directing MTU Facilities Management. She earned a BS in Mechanical Engineering and an MS in Engineering, both at Michigan Tech. Sleeman brings strong industry experience to students in the Construction Management Program, and will increase sustainable construction course offerings for students.

John Bean

John Bean joins Michigan Tech as a visiting professor of practice in the Department of Civil, Environmental, and Geospatial Engineering. He earned an MS in Civil and Structural Engineering at the University of Connecticut and a BS in Civil Engineering at the University of New Hampshire. He also earned a graduate certificate in Surveying Engineering at the University of Maine. His focus for teaching includes surveying, mapping and database support to engineering field-based research projects. He has over 40 years of experience in surveying, civil engineering, and GIS, both in teaching and in practice. His work has taken him to Antarctica, the North Slope of Alaska, and the Mojave Desert, among other places.

Jennifer Miller

Jennifer Miller joins the faculty as a professor of practice. She earned a Master’s in Business Administration at Central Michigan University and a BS in Civil Engineering at Michigan Tech. Her teaching interests focus on construction management. She has more than 20 years of construction experience, including working for General Contractors, Specialty Contractors, design firms, and governmental entities including Michigan Department of Transportation.

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Anna Stuhlmacher

Dr. Anna Stuhlmacher joins the faculty as an assistant professor. She comes to Michigan Tech from the University of Michigan. She earned a BS at Boston University and an MS and PhD at the University of Michigan, all in electrical engineering. She interned at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and grew up in the Chicago area. Her research explores optimizing and controlling distributed energy resources (like solar panels, batteries, and electric vehicles) in the power grid to provide flexibility in the transition to more sustainable and reliable energy systems.

Department of Engineering Fundamentals

Gabriel Draughon

Dr. Gabriel Draughon joins the faculty as an assistant teaching professor. He comes to Michigan Tech from the University of Michigan, where he earned an MS and PhD in Civil Engineering (Intelligent Systems). He earned a BS in Biosystems Engineering at the University of Kentucky. His research and teaching interests involve Smart Cities, and how sensing technologies in urban settings help better understand how people move through, interact with, and derive benefits from social infrastructure.

Department of Chemical Engineering

Kaiwu Huang

Dr. Kaiwu Huang comes to Michigan Tech from Virginia Tech, where he worked as a research associate in the Department of Mining and Minerals Engineering. He earned a BS in Mining and Minerals Engineering at China University of Mining and Technology in Beijing, and an MS and PhD in Mining and Minerals Engineering at Virginia Tech. His research focus is on sustainable mining, including mineral processing, mineral flotation, solid/liquid separation, carbon ore beneficiation, rare earth extraction, and copper concentration.

Luis Manzano

Dr. Luis Manzano comes to Michigan Tech from Monterrey, Mexico, where he earned an MS and PhD in Biotechnology at the Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM). He earned his undergraduate degree in Biotechnology Engineering, Universidad Politécnica de Pachuca. His research focuses on the sustainable purification of PEG-modified proteins/enzymes (PEGylated), used as biopharmaceuticals in the treatment of disease and potentially in the recovery and purification of anticancer, low-molecular weight compounds such as flavonoids.

Department of Manufacturing and Mechanical Engineering Technology

Rachel Store

Rachel Store joins the faculty as an assistant teaching professor. She earned a BS and MS in Mechanical Engineering, both at Michigan Tech. Her research focus is on friction stir processing and Lean and Quality manufacturing. Her teaching and research interests include additive manufacturing, forming processes, and materials manufacturing with friction stir processing.

Department of Material Science and Engineering

Alexandra Glover

Dr. Alexandra Glover joins the faculty as an assistant professor. She comes to Michigan Tech from Los Alamos National Laboratory, where she worked as a research and development engineer with Sigma Division. Glover earned an MS and PhD at the Colorado School of Mines in Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, and a BS in Materials Science and Engineering at Michigan Tech. Her research interests include mechanical behavior of materials, strengthening mechanisms, deformation processing and design for manufacturing, steels, shape memory alloys, and deformation induced phase transformations.

Joshua Mueller

Dr. Joshua Mueller joins the faculty as an assistant professor. He comes to Michigan Tech from the Dynamic-Structure Design and Engineering Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory, where he worked as a research and development engineer. Mueller earned an MS and PhD at the Colorado School of Mines in Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, and a BS in Materials Science and Engineering at University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research interests include physical metallurgy, phase transformations, thermodynamics, and microstructure evolution.

Sriram Vijayan

Dr. Sriram Vijayan joins Michigan Tech as an assistant professor. He earned a PhD in Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Connecticut, a Master’s in Materials Engineering at the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, and a Bachelors in Materials Engineering at Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University. His research interests include understanding microstructural evolution in materials under complex thermal conditions,
process-structure-property relationships of additively manufactured builds, and materials for nuclear reactor applications.

Department of Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics

Shawn Brueshaber

Dr. Shawn Brueshaber comes to Michigan Tech from Western Michigan University, where he earned an MS and PhD in Mechanical Engineering. He earned a BS in Aerospace Engineering at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach, Florida. After graduating, he spent several years in industry. His research is focused on the polar atmospheric dynamics of the giant planets—Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, with a goal of developing a comprehensive theory of weather and climate applicable to all planetary bodies with an atmosphere.

Chad Walber

Dr. Chad Walber joins the faculty as an Associate Teaching Professor. He earned an MS and PhD in Mechanical Engineering at Michigan Tech, and a BS in both Electrical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering, also from Tech. He worked at PCB Piezotronics as a research and development engineer and at Michigan Tech as a visiting professor of practice. His teaching and research focus includes metrology, dynamic systems, noise and vibration, acoustics, and the test and measurement of those quantities, including developing specification and calibration standards for microphones and sound level meters.

Bhisham Sharma

Dr. Bhisham Sharma joins the faculty as an associate professor. He comes to Michigan Tech from Wichita State University, where he worked as an assistant professor in the Department of Aerospace Engineering. He earned an MS and PhD in Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering at Purdue University, and a BS in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Pune in Pune, India. Sharma was also a post-doctoral research associate and a visiting assistant professor at Purdue. His research involves the overlap of solid mechanics, structural dynamics, acoustics, and advanced manufacturing. He investigates the fundamental mechanics and acoustics of novel engineered material systems such as acoustic metamaterials, phononic structures, architected lattice structures, stochastic foams, and advanced manufacturing.
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