Category: ADVANCE Weekly Roundup

ADVANCE Weekly Roundup: Largest-ever survey exposes career obstacles for LGBTQ scientists

LGBTQ scientists experience career-damaging harassment according to the largest-ever survey recently published in AAAS’s Science Advances and featured in Nature.  The study of thousands of US-based researchers finds that those from sexual and gender minorities are more likely to experience workplace prejudice and harassment, fewer career opportunities and fewer resources.  Further, LGBTQ individuals experience greater stress from work leading to health problems, depressive symptoms, and insomnia. Help change this pattern! Advocate for institutional measures to address harassment. Please become an ally able to recognize and reduce these effects on talented colleagues and students by attending Safe Place (or Safe Zone) educational sessions.  

If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.
The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. These articles are available on the ADVANCE Newsblog (https://blogs.mtu.edu/advance/). To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.


ADVANCE Weekly Roundup: Documenting impacts of the pandemic on you.

As we start to see light at the end of the pandemic tunnel, it is important to acknowledge that the effects will last for many years. In discussions of these effects, a recurring theme emerges: documenting impacts. This is not a one-time task: the lingering effects of the pandemic should be identified and reflected on annually and their impact on job performance and evaluation revisited. 

Today’s edition of the ADVANCE weekly roundup features a short article from the Susan Bulkeley Butler Center for Leadership Excellence at Purdue University. Although it focuses on documenting impacts on faculty, it provides insights that are applicable to everyone. Importantly, it suggests that the list is indicative but not exhaustive – an acknowledgement that the pandemic has impacted everyone differently and that some of the impacts may not yet be recognized.

If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.
The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. These articles are available on the ADVANCE Newsblog (https://blogs.mtu.edu/advance/). To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.


ADVANCE Weekly Roundup: Programs to Diversify Role Models in STEMM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math and Medicine)

An engineer friend once told my wife that my daughter, who was considering majors in college, was not the right type to be an engineer. Too often, we develop preconceived ideas of what a scientist, engineer, or artist is expected to look like. We use such stereotypes to simplify the complex world around us. This practice becomes harmful when it projects narrow preconceived expectations on others. Teachers and professors who consciously or unconsciously expect different competencies from different genders or races not only constrain their own ability to think creatively and originally in the classroom but they do real harm to the ambitions of students.

Today’s Weekly Roundup focuses on two articles from Science that describe programs that work to widen our expectations and images of what a professional in STEMM (science, technology, engineering, math, and medicine) looks like. And for my engineering friend and the record, my daughter earned a computer engineering degree from the University of Michigan and is in the last year of her PhD in computer science at MIT.  

The first article, “Women innovators become STEM ambassadors for girls,” describes an AAAS program called IF/THEN. It focuses on ambassadors who are selected to become high-profile role models for middle-school girls. One goal is to break down narrow exclusionary ideas of what a scientist or engineer looks like and does. When we show that engineers can be dancers and artists and that scientists can be poets and athletes, we allow young people to see greater opportunity for themselves in STEMM.

The second article describes the contributions of Shirley Malcom who has led the Sea (STEMM Equity Achievement) Change Program, which is supported by AAAS and helps academic institutions identify how they can better serve diverse students and faculty. Sea Change grew out of the 2005 Athena SWAN Charter which was developed to promote greater participation of women in science in the United Kingdom. Malcom adapted and broadened this program to include other underrepresented groups.

Today’s feature was shared with us by David Flaspohler. If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. These articles are available on the ADVANCE Newsblog (https://blogs.mtu.edu/advance/). To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.


ADVANCE Weekly Roundup: Ways to accelerate a culture shift

How can Michigan Tech accelerate the cultural shift needed to make campus feel truly inclusive to women and minorities? Today’s ADVANCE weekly roundup features two Chronicle of Higher Education articles about achieving this shift. In one, Alec Gallimore, Dean of Engineering at the University of Michigan, describes how his college significantly transformed leadership by addressing where the playing field wasn’t level, such as by questioning perceptions of job candidates, ensuring equal access to mentors, and evaluating department chair applicants based on their diversity records and plans. In the other, Frank Gilliam, chancellor at the University of North Carolina-Greensboro describes how his campus is achieving the threshold of “substantive representation” through methods such as resource allocation and messaging.


If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.
The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. These articles are available on the ADVANCE Newsblog (https://blogs.mtu.edu/advance/). To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.


March 12, 2021 Weekly Roundup: 8 Practical, Sustainable Steps to a Diverse Faculty

A strategic and sustainable approach to realizing a more diverse faculty is both overdue and critical to the future of higher education. Two university deans offer timely advice for enacting such an approach. They recommend introducing BIPOC faculty to the university’s unique features and facilities through invited presentations, postdocs, or conferences in order to create positive impressions and connections even before a hire is possible. Proactive recruitment beyond the “post and hope” method is necessary but takes care and both individual and collective effort. Apart from the start-up package, robust systems of support for faculty development should be available, utilized, and affirmed by academic leaders. Such strategies are “neither mysterious nor terrifically expensive.”

If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.
The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. These articles are available on the ADVANCE Newsblog (https://blogs.mtu.edu/advance/). To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.


February 18 2021 ADVANCE Weekly Roundup

The COVID-19 pandemic has had profound impacts on all aspects of academia. An article from Science reports that recent studies indicate that the pandemic’s impact has hit academic mothers particularly hard. It has exacerbated existing disparities and created further challenges for women, including significant loss of time dedicated to research. Today’s edition of the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup features this article which encourages the use and consideration of COVID-19 impact statements in current and post-pandemic tenure and promotion reviews.

If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. These articles are available on the ADVANCE Newsblog (https://blogs.mtu.edu/advance/). To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.


February 12, 2021 ADVANCE Weekly Roundup

Incorrect assumptions on the part of one or both parties during discourse can often push “hot buttons” and devolve an otherwise civil conversation into a conflict. Learning and listening plummets as tensions rise.  When conflict arises, the way in which we respond is far more telling than we may think. Today’s featured article for the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup outlines “7 Steps To Transform Conflict Into Collegiality.” As members of the Michigan Tech CommUNITY how we treat each other during discussions is also important.  Listening to understand, and focusing on the concepts instead of labeling the person, helps us all learn and grow while maintaining collegiality and space for all individuals to thrive.

If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. These articles are available on the ADVANCE Newsblog (https://blogs.mtu.edu/advance/). To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.


February 5, 2021 ADVANCE Weekly Roundup

What is white privilege? In some ways, it’s easier to understand what it’s not rather than what it is. It’s not an outright denial that white people have never struggled nor does it assume that everything a white person has accomplished is unearned. Rather, white privilege refers to an ingrained knowledge, often invisible to those who have always had it, that’s distinct from abilities, efforts, or income. That knowledge (or familiarity) allows some to navigate a situation with ease, while those without that prior knowledge struggle.  Today’s edition of the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup comes from tolerance.org and unpacks this “double whammy” term that often inspires pushback. It acknowledges that “white privilege exists because of historic, enduring racism and biases,” explores the history of the term, and offers suggestions for what to do once white privilege has been recognized. This article brings to the forefront a critical concept for furthering diversity, equity, and inclusion. 

If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. These articles are available on the ADVANCE Newsblog (https://blogs.mtu.edu/advance/). To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.


January 28, 2021 ADVANCE Weekly Roundup

Intersectionality, a term coined by Kimberlé Crenshaw in 1989, is a way of understanding social relations by examining intersecting forms of discrimination. Effectively, this means that multiple forms of discrimination such as racism, sexism, and ageism may be present at the same time in a person’s life. Often, efforts to address discrimination focus on one form of  discrimination and overlook the compounding and transformational effect of concurrent forms of oppression. Today’s edition of the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup features a YouTube video entitled “What Is Intersectionality?” that offers a concise overview of the concept. 

If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. These articles are available on the ADVANCE Newsblog (https://blogs.mtu.edu/advance/). To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.


January 22, 2021 ADVANCE Weekly Roundup

The year 2020 was a challenge; a pandemic and continued systemic oppression of underrepresented minorities laid bare many of the inequities we’ve known existed. As a society, great strides have been made, yet there are stark realities that demand our continued efforts. This week’s edition of the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup features an article from USA Today that highlights the successes and challenges facing women in 2020 and how we can ensure that 2021 continues and builds upon this progress. Now, it’s essential that we engage with women and underrepresented minorities by listening, assessing and recognizing mental and physical loads, and creating equitable policies and practices for our workplaces. Uniting together, we can continue to address the systemic issues made more apparent by COVID-19 and the challenges of the past year to ensure that our 2020 hindsight is honest about what has worked and what remains to be done.

If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. These articles are available on the ADVANCE Newsblog (https://blogs.mtu.edu/advance/). To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.