Tag: Diversity

ADVANCE Weekly Roundup: Supporting Indigenous Students

As we work to diversify our student body, we need to reflect and adapt commonplace practices to be inclusive of the needs of students from different backgrounds. Today’s Roundup features a study of stresses related to self-beliefs, ethnic identity, and cultural congruency experienced by Native American undergraduates and how we might adapt to better support these students.  Among the changes suggested to better support these students are increased access to advising, mentoring by older students, and encouraging joining clubs and other social groups. In the classroom, we can support Native American students by creating improved cultural understanding, a collaborative learning environment, and a communal rather than competitive environment in which students are evaluated on information mastery rather than relative grading dependent upon peer performance. This shift to a “learning community” benefits all students and reduces feelings of isolation and stress, which leads to better outcomes for everyone.

Today’s feature was shared with us by ADVANCE PI Team. If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.

ADVANCE Weekly Roundup: Gender Inequities in Academic Medicine and the Life Sciences

You may have read the article in the New York Times that came out recently about women physicians earning 2 million less over their lifetimes than men physicians.This study and a variety of research topics on gender inequities within medicine and the academic life sciences are discussed in a recent Freakonomics MD podcast led by Dr. Bapu Jena of Harvard University. For example, the tendency of men researchers to “upsell” their research contributions within their academic papers with superlatives like novel, unique, and unprecedented is one factor thought to contribute to differences in citation rates, which are key drivers of pay differences between men and women. The podcast addresses other issues that have significant repercussions for equity in career advancement in STEM fields. It is well worth a listen.

Today’s feature was shared with us by Robert Hutchinson. If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.

ADVANCE Weekly Roundup: The importance of leaders developing support for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

This week’s article from the Journal of Diversity in Higher Education explores the importance of academic leadership in developing support for diversity, equity, inclusion, and sense of belonging (DEIS) among faculty. Academic leaders with more visibly favorable attitudes towards diversity positively influence faculty in their awareness and support for DEIS. This research suggests that this may be especially important for faculty who don’t often question the status quo of policies and practices that retain historic systemic bias. This article provides an opportunity for us to reflect on how we, along with our academic leaders, express favorable attitudes towards DEIS efforts and help our institution to make progress in this valued area. Although this study focused on academic leadership, it highlights opportunities we may have for influencing attitudes about DEIS in our professional and personal leadership roles.

Today’s feature was shared with us by the ADVANCE PI Team. If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.

ADVANCE Weekly Roundup: Allyship for Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Sense of Belonging

A critical component of promoting diversity, equity, inclusion, and sense of belonging (DEIS) is deep and meaningful collaboration that enacts allyship. This is a cooperative model whereby people from diverse backgrounds, especially those with power and privilege, join together in solidarity to overcome systems that disadvantage some groups, including unlearning assumptions about what constitutes “help” – particularly the kind that reinforces unwanted power structures.

One research article that explores this point is “Male allyship in institutional STEMM gender equity initiatives.” The article centers on men’s self-understanding as “champions for change,” the barriers and risks of this paradigm, and evolving perceptions among participants in the program. The concept of men as “champions” in gender-equity programs is not uncommon, and one such program is “Male Champions of Change.”

Initially, study participants tended to perceive “champions” as an empowering term that encouraged men’s involvement in social justice work. However, by the second year, participants began to perceive  “the gendered positioning of male championship is at odds with gender equity and structural change.” Rather, DEIS is about all of us and we all gain when we remove barriers to equity, including terms and concepts like “champions.” 

Today’s feature was shared with us by the ADVANCE Advocates team. If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.

Seminar: Preparation for Leading in DEI Work for Your Team

Dr. Candy McCorkle currently serves as the Vice President of Diversity and Inclusion at Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI. Prior to joining the senior administration of WMU she served as the Assistant Vice President of Student Affairs and the Director of Diversity and Inclusion at Alma College, Alma, MI.  In her more than 20 years in higher education she has served as faculty member, program director and assistant dean. Dr. McCorkle has served regional public universities, private liberal arts colleges, community colleges and taught abroad. She earned her B.A. in Psychology from Wright State University, Dayton, OH, her M.S. in Clinical Psychology from  Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI and her Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Supervision from Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI.  Dr. McCorkle has always demonstrated her commitment to moving organizations toward inclusivity.

Following the summer of 2020 many colleges and universities have begun to focus on the diversity, equity and inclusion.  Although this is an admirable focus it is shortsighted because most faculty, staff, administrators and students are not trained in how to integrate diversity, equity and inclusion into their work.  It is the purpose of this presentation to introduce participants to some of the competencies necessary for effectively engaging in diversity, equity and inclusion work.

The five basic skills will be explored and demonstrated how to use them to build the foundations of effectively engaging in diversity, equity and inclusion work. Individuals are more apt to engage in work when they feel they have the skills necessary to begin the work. It is the objective that upon the conclusion of this presentation individuals will be able to identify, describe and implement the five basic skills to begin leading their team in diversity, equity and inclusion work.

This seminar is virtual, and will be held Friday, Dec. 3 from 1-2pm Eastern Time. The zoom link is https://bit.ly/3cmrNpO. A Diversity and Inclusion Guidebook is also available for download/reading at https://bit.ly/3cpCMPp. Dr. McCorkle has also agreed to do a very limited number of one-on-one sessions after the seminar, which are by sign up only here.

As always, please feel free to contact the ADVANCE office at advance-mtu@mtu.edu if you have any questions or concerns!

ADVANCE Weekly Roundup: Eliminating the penalties for motherhood in STEM

The COVID-19 pandemic has called attention to the impediments that women in STEM face as mothers, including a multipronged “maternal wall” with career-long ramifications. This week’s Roundup takes you to a virtual conference, “Motherhood and career retention in STEM: Systemic barriers and actionable solutions” held on May 5, 2021. The event was sponsored by Mothers in Science and features lucid summaries and original research into the challenges and structural barriers for women in STEM and in faculty careers more broadly as well as actionable solutions. A summary of the conference issues appeared in The Scientist featuring Mothers in Science co-founder Isabel Torres, a PhD in genetics and mother of four. Refreshingly, the presentation videos often reveal the presence of children, a deliberate strategy to make visible the work that must go on behind-the-scenes by academic mothers.

Today’s feature was shared with us by the ADVANCE team. If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.

ADVANCE Weekly Roundup: Teaching the Neurodiverse

Are you wondering how best to teach students who are on the spectrum?  In today’s ADVANCE Weekly Roundup, a college teacher who herself is on the spectrum corrects some myths about the neurodiverse and provides recommendations for teaching them. One of the myths is that autism is limited to young white men; but it affects people of all races, genders, and ages. Diagnoses in adults and in women are both on the rise. Also, autism affects each individual in different ways, so challenging the diagnosis because it doesn’t conform to stereotypes is a poor strategy. Read this week’s article on 10 Things Faculty Need to Understand about Autism to improve your classroom skills.

Today’s feature was shared with us by Sonia Goltz. If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.

ADVANCE Weekly Roundup: STEMinists: Young role models for women in STEM

Today’s ADVANCE post celebrates the positive influence that faculty can have on the success of students. Specifically, we note how women and under-represented faculty in STEM serve as role models, whether through their presence in classrooms and labs or in professional associations such as WIA or AISES’s Lighting the Pathway program. In this American Psychological Association Science Brief on her research into women’s experiences in STEM fields, Dr. Isis Settles (U of Michigan) describes studies that document the structural and interpersonal challenges that discourage women from remaining in STEM fields. However, she also found evidence for a protective factor associated with resilience and concludes, “Strong gender identification may help women in STEM to function well (both psychologically and in terms of their academic/work performance).”

The website STEMinist offers an inspiring example of such an identity by providing dozens of short biographies of young women who have navigated college and secured fulfilling careers in STEM. It is heartening that these young women seem to hold a woman-in-STEM identity as central to their STEM careers and we applaud STEM women faculty as role models.

Today’s feature was shared with us by David Flaspohler If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.

Mentoring for Associate Professors Next Week

Advanced Career Management (ACM) will offer an open “Office Hour” for mid-career faculty during the week of November 1-5. The event will pair an associate-level faculty member with a full professor to discuss career-related topics. The theme of this event is “Upgrade Your Profile.” Faculty can raise other topics of interest, but are encouraged to review CVs and discuss strategies for accomplishing high-value career goals.

Associate professors who are interested in participating should email advance-mtu@mtu.edu with their contact information. The ADVANCE office will suggest a one-hour meeting time based on calendar availabilities for the mentor and mentee. Both an in-person location and a Zoom link will be provided. Participating mentors include Will Cantrell (Associate Provost and Dean, Graduate School), Shiyue Fang (Professor, Chemistry), Adrienne Minnerick (Professor, Chemical Engineering), and Judith Perlinger (Environmental Sciences).

The ACM program is an initiative of ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion.

Mentors

Adrienne R. Minerick
Director and PI, ADVANCE at Michigan Tech
Professor, Chemical Engineering
President, American Society for Engineering Education

Adrienne R. Minerick is President of the American Society for Engineering Education (2021-2022), Director of ADVANCE at Michigan Tech and Professor of Chemical Engineering.  She has served as Associate Dean for Research and Innovation in the College of Engineering, Assistant to the Provost for Faculty Development, Dean of the School of Technology, founded the College of Computing and most recently served as Interim Dean of the Pavlis Honors College. She has received numerous honors and awards, including the distinction of Fellow of AAAS and ASEE, a National Science Foundation CAREER Award, the Raymond W. Fahien Award from the Chemical Engineering Division of ASEE, and Michigan Tech’s Fredrick D. Williams Instructional Innovation Award. She and her students have published over 75 archival journal publications, book chapters, or proceedings articles and earned 23 best paper/presentation awards. Adrienne previously served as the President of the American Electrophoresis Society and on the ASEE’s Board of Directors as First Vice President and Professional Interest Council I Chair. She also chaired ASEE’s National Diversity Committee. Her research and service interests regularly intersect and involve underserved individuals with an emphasis on research experiences to increase engagement and retention.

Will Cantrell
Associate Provost and Dean of the Graduate School
Professor, Physics

Will Cantrell joined Physics in the fall of 2001. Since then, he has served as the faculty representative for the Goldwater Scholarship, the coordinator for the Summer Undergraduate Fellowship (SURF) program, director of the Earth Planetary and Space Sciences Institute (EPSSI), and associate dean in the Graduate School. In July of 2020, he stepped into the position of Associate Provost for Graduate Education and Dean of the Graduate School.
In the summer, you might find him roll casting to a rising trout on the Otter River.

Shiyue Fang
Professor of Chemistry

Dr. Shiyue Fang is a synthetic organic chemist. He obtained PhD in organometallic chemistry and conducted postdoctoral study in nucleic acid chemistry. Currently, projects in his research group include the development of technologies for sensitive DNA and RNA synthesis and non-chromatographic purification of DNA and peptide, synthesis of mono-disperse polyethylene glycol and derivatives, discovery of new organic transformations, and the use of organic synthesis to address fundamental physical chemical and biological questions. 

Judith A. Perlinger
Professor, Environmental Engineering

Dr. Perlinger teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in environmental engineering including Fundamentals of Environmental Engineering, Sustainability, Transport and Transformation of Organic Pollutants, and Applied Boundary Layer Micrometeorology. Her research interests are in the areas of air and water quality and sustainability with projects focused on processes at environmental and disciplinary interfaces. For example, to study environmental processing of chemicals, she has employed field, laboratory, computational, and modeling approaches. Her recent research activities have related to the atmosphere, sustainability, and the Great Lakes and involve measurement and modeling of atmospheric and aqueous chemical concentrations and atmosphere-surface exchange fluxes, and examination of the chemical governance and sustainability.

ARC Network Webinars

Register for Ramon Goings and Joya Misra’s Final Research Webinars  The ARC Network is excited to begin our series hosting members of the 2020-2021 Virtual Visiting Scholars (VVS) cohort to present on their VVS projects and discuss the implications of their findings!  The VVS program annually supports 2-4 selected scholars to complete metasyntheses and meta-analyses of existing literature on topics relevant to equity in STEM.Ramon Goings

“Examining How Race/Ethnicity and Gender is Explored in Research on STEM Contingent Faculty”
Oct 28, 2021 03:00 PM ET  
Dr. Goings will present on his meta-analysis of research on contingent STEM faculty to assess the inclusion of faculty at the intersection of race/ethnicity and gender.Register


Joya Misra

“Gender, Intersectionality, Workload and Leadership in STEM Departments”
Nov 4, 2021 03:00 PM EST  
Dr. Misra will present her work focusing on impacts of intersectional identity on and inclusion in decision-making and leadership with additional emphasis on retention and career advancement of faculty.Register