Tag: BIPOC

Black Indigenous People of Color

ADVANCE Weekly Roundup: Horrific Discovery and Warning: academic pursuits should be ethical and informed by federal laws concerning Indigenous peoples

There are many reasons to be sensitive to and acknowledge diverse experiences, values, beliefs, and ways of being. Our team works to highlight some reasons in the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.  However, occasionally situations come to our attention that we had not thought about previously.  The 1990 Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) requires institutions with federal funding not only to catalog their Indigenous collections, but to take steps to return them to the appropriate tribal nation communities. This NBC News article {https://apple.news/A5P82kqRFReyBdUB_Ux062g} about a discovery at University of North Dakota serves as a warning that academic pursuits should be informed by federal laws concerning Indigenous peoples.

Further, past and present research activity should demonstrate respect and consideration for the people who are affected by those activities.  In situations like these, transparency and sensitivity should extend to the community the university is part of and to communities that academics are engaged with in research activities.  When we investigate or discover this hasn’t happened in the past, we should take immediate steps to rectify the situation to the best of our abilities.  For example, Michigan Tech scholars are increasingly educating themselves how to be more inclusive and equitable in research, and partnering to be more collaborative with Indigenous communities and the Ojibwa homelands of the Keweenaw and beyond.  

Today’s feature was shared with us by the ADVANCE Team. If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.

ADVANCE Weekly Roundup: Women do a majority of office ‘housework’; Women of Color do a majority of DEI in Tech and Engineering

This article compares workload distributions among faculty in Tech and Engineering. It documents that women do more of the work to keep things running smoothly, often referred to as office “housework.” Such work rarely earns formal credit or recognition. In technology fields, women of color report that they are asked to lead HR or DEI efforts they were not originally hired to conduct, yet this work isn’t compensated or recognized as promotion-worthy. This has been termed the “minority tax.”

Further, in the report from the Center for WorkLife Law & Society of Women Engineers, women of color more strongly than White women report being shut out of creative work without access to desirable assignments. In Engineering, the authors found that 26% of White men but 55% of women of color report doing more of the undervalued work than their colleagues of comparable seniority and experience. In addition, 61% of White men, but less than half of women of color, report they were more likely than their peers to be assigned to high-profile tasks or teams.

Navigating the minority tax makes workplace climates challenging because speaking up about the workload distribution often induces racial and gender stereotypes around ‘being difficult.’ Increasing awareness of these tendencies can empower colleagues to consciously work to create more equitable workloads ranging from DEI efforts to office tasks. Please feel free to seek guidance and just in time strategies from the ADVANCE Advocates Team.

Today’s feature was shared with us by the ADVANCE PIs. If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.

Celebrating Black History Month, Week 4

Dr. Patricia Bath: An ophthalmologist and laser scientist. She invented a new device & technique for cataract surgery known as laserphaco. She was also the first woman to chair an ophthalmology residency program in the U.S. (At Drew-UCLA). https://bit.ly/3GyE8En

Dr. George Carruthers: An aeronautical and astronautical engineer who worked for the US Naval Research Lab. He invented the first far-UV electronographic detector design that was robust enough for space. He developed the first moon-based observatory that was used by the Apollo 16 mission. https://go.nature.com/3grjlbd

Dr. Susan McKinney-Steward: The 3rd Black woman to earn a medical degree in the US, and 1st in New York State. She had her own practice in Brooklyn, co-founded the Brooklyn Women’s Homeopathic Hospital and Dispensary. She also sat on the board of, and practiced medicine at the Brooklyn Home for Aged Colored People. https://bit.ly/3GzNzTT

Dr. Daniel Hale Williams: A physician and surgeon who had his own practice in Chicago. He adopted sterilization procedures for his office based on the findings of Louis Pasteur and Joseph Lister. He performed the first successful heart surgery in 1893. Was elected as the only Black charter member of the American College of Surgeons in 1913. https://bit.ly/35WCsb1

Dr. Jane C. Wright: A physician who did groundbreaking cancer research. Her testing of new chemicals on human leukemias and other cancers of the lymphatic system laid the foundations for chemotherapy. https://bit.ly/3Gz7D91

Lewis Howard Latimer: Self-taught in the art of mechanical drawing. Worked as a patent draftsman. Invented an evaporative air conditioner, an improved process for manufacturing carbon filaments for light bulbs, and an improved toilet system for railroad cars. https://bit.ly/3HATCsv

Dr. Euphemia Lofton Haynes: First Black woman to earn a Ph.D. in mathematics in 1943. She taught for 47 years and was the first woman on the DC Board of Education where she fought racial segregation and supported a lawsuit to desegregate the school system. https://bit.ly/3HCaRdg

Garrett Morgan: Almost entirely self-taught, he obtained his first patent for an improved sewing machine. This led to his invention that gave him financial freedom: hair straightening cream. Then in 1914 he patented a breathing device or hood that became the prototype and precursor for the gas masks used during WWI. He also invented/patented the 3 way traffic light that is the precursor to our modern traffic lights. https://bit.ly/3ovT7IW

ADVANCE Weekly Roundup: Public Statements are Not Actions

This is Black History month; next month is Women’s History month. We celebrate by highlighting the first black woman to earn her Ph.D. in physics in the U.S., Willie Hobbs Moore, who was also an electrical engineer and received her degree in physics from the University of Michigan in 1972. Dr. Moore is known for a number of achievements including bringing Japanese manufacturing practices to Ford in the 1980s, working in the field of molecular spectroscopy, and supporting STEM education for minority students. 

Dr. Moore was able to break through a glass ceiling but, unfortunately, fifty years later this glass ceiling remains for many minorities. This IEEE article suggests institutions need to move beyond public statements expressing solidarity with the Black community to examining the different types of anti-Black violence that  is tolerated within their own campuses, such as beginning with engineering education and practice. This examination should include what the authors call the “engineering ecosystem” and the “three realms of experience” that Black students must navigate within this ecosystem (mainstream culture, Black culture; the status of the oppressed minority). 

Today’s feature was shared with us by The ADVANCE PI Team. If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.

Celebrating Black History Month, Week 3

Lonnie G. Johnson: A mechanical and nuclear engineer, he worked for NASA and the Air Force. He worked on the Galileo mission to Jupiter as well as the early stages of the Cassini project. Perhaps most noted as the inventor of the Super Soaker, he holds over 100 patents with more pending. https://bit.ly/3usEeeh

Alma Levant Hayden: A chemist and expert in spectrophotometry, the measurement of how substances absorb light. She was one of the first (if not the first) Black scientists at the FDA where she exposed the anti-cancer drug Krebiozen as a fraud. https://bit.ly/331OpLk

Dr. Charles Henry Turner: A behavioral scientist and early pioneer in the field of insect behavior. He was the first to prove that insects have the capacity to hear and that they learn by trial and error. He also discovered that honeybees can see visual patterns. Quite possibly the first to show that bees can also see color. https://bit.ly/3uwQdaw

Dr. Willie Hobbs Moore: The first African American woman to earn a Ph.D. in Physics in 1972. Her research focused on infrared spectroscopy. She also advocated for better STEM education for minority populations. https://bit.ly/3J87ZVF

Benjamin Banneker: Largely self-educated mathematician, astronomer, & writer. Best known for his almanacs (1792-1797) that included his own astronomical calculations, literature, medical and tidal information. Banneker wrote a letter to Thomas Jefferson “respectfully chiding” him and his fellow patriots for their hypocrisy – enslaving Black people while fighting the British for their own independence. https://bit.ly/3HACDqu

Carolyn Parker: She earned two Masters, one in Mathematics from University of Michigan & one in Physics from MIT. She was a research physicist on the Dayton Project, part of the Manhattan Project. She helped research using polonium as the initiator for atomic explosions. https://bit.ly/3rvbgs3

Dr. Herman Branson: A biophysicist, he made significant contributions to how proteins work and how they contribute to diseases like sickle cell anemia. He is best known for his research on the alpha helix protein structure. https://bit.ly/3rxhurz

Celebrating Black History Month, Week 2

Bessie Blount Griffin: A physical therapist in the late 1940’s who helped teach her amputee clients how to write using their mouths and feet. She also invented a portable apparatus that enabled amputees to feed themselves. https://bit.ly/3L1rcKx

George Washington Carver: An accomplished botanist and inventor. He developed techniques to improve soils depleted by repeated plantings of cotton using crop rotation. He ensured the success of this technique by popularizing the new crops by developing hundreds of applications for them. https://bit.ly/3oxlfeN

Dr. Mae Jemison: Fluent in Russian, Japanese & Swahili, was a Peace Corps medical officer and had her own private medical practice. She was the first Black woman in space (STS-47, aboard Endeavor). She was also the first real astronaut on an episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation at the invitation of LeVar Burton. https://bit.ly/3LfTp0o

Dr. Guion Bluford Jr.: An Air Force pilot who flew 144 combat missions in Vietnam. He was the first first Black man to travel into space (STS-8, aboard Challenger), and laughed the entire way: “It was such a fun ride.” Inducted into US Astronaut Hall of Fame 1997. https://bit.ly/3LeU4Po

Alice Ball: A chemist, teacher, and researcher. She developed an injectable treatment for leprosy. She was also the first woman to graduate with a Masters in chemistry from College of Hawaii, and became the institute’s first woman chemistry instructor when she was only 23. https://bit.ly/3rwRrRp

Dr. William Warrick Cardozo: A physician and pediatrician as well as professor at Howard University. He was a pioneer investigator of sickle cell anemia and a leader in medical research of problems affecting people of African descent. https://bit.ly/3ouNtqB

Dr. Bettye Washington Greene: An industrial research chemist. She was the first Black female Ph.D. chemist to work in a professional position at Dow Chemical Company. She worked with latex and polymers, including interactions between latex and paper. https://bit.ly/3otEBBe

ADVANCE Weekly Roundup: Acknowledging structural barriers – a visualization shift from leaky pipeline to a hostile obstacle course in academia

Equal practices are often mistaken as synonymous with equitable practices.  However, the path to get from point A to point B can be different for different people because the surrounding system of people (faculty, staff, students, society) does not respond to all individuals similarly. For example, those who have regularly been extended the benefit of perceived competence before presenting research results may have a hard time relating to those who must first prove their competence before the audience listens to the research results. These multiple layers of different treatment and different barriers are described in this article by Berhe et. al. in Nature Geoscience, as a hostile obstacle course that women and researchers of diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds have to overcome in STEMM fields.  Acknowledging that the pathways are different and adjusting resources to be responsive to those differences are key ways to position each individual to be successful.

Today’s feature was shared with us by the ADVANCE PI Team. If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.

Celebrating Black History Month, Week 1

As a way to celebrate Black History Month, ADVANCE is highlighting a different person every day who has made contributions to STEM in the past and present. This week we are featuring the following:

Dr. Marie M. Daly: First Black woman to obtain a Ph.D in chemistry in the US. She discovered the relationship between high cholesterol and heart disease.

Dr. Warren Washington: Distinguished climate scientist and former chair of the National Science Board. He developed one of the first atmospheric computer models of Earth’s climate.

Katherine Johnson: A school teacher who joined NACA (today’s NASA) as a “human computer”. Her calculations helped sync Apollo’s Lunar Landing Module with the Command and Service Module. She was featured in “Hidden Figures.”

Dr. Percy Julian: A pioneering chemist whose synthesis of a chemical called physostigmine, which was used to treat glaucoma, is “one of the top 25 greatest achievements in the history of American chemistry.”

Lyda Newman: An inventor who patented a new type of hairbrush that was specifically for African American hair. The hairbrush was the first to have entirely synthetic bristles. Her invention made it cheaper and quicker to manufacture hair brushes. She was the 3rd Black woman to ever receive a patent.

Vivien Thomas: A researcher who was paid as a janitor while doing amazing doctoral research. He developed a surgery that would successfully help save the lives of infants born with Tetralogy of Fallot.

ADVANCE Weekly Roundup: Presidential Executive Order Advancing Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Accessibility

This last month, President Biden signed an Executive Order Advancing Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Accessibility (DEIA) in the Federal Government.  The premise is based upon public servants reflecting the communities they serve; this has parallels in academia as well.  ADVANCE at Michigan Tech is very encouraged by these measures to assess DEIA in the workforce and will work with our Vice President for Diversity and Inclusion to support the development of strategic plans for our campus.  The EO expands learning opportunities, addresses harassment in the workplace, equity in professional development opportunities, and advances mechanisms for pay equity.   The DEIA language is deliberately inclusive of individuals with disabilities and LGBTQ+ individuals in addition to gender, race/ethnicity, and socio-economic status. Adopting these foundational values into our DNA will strengthen Michigan Tech for the future.

For further reading on the Executive Order, please look at the Fact Sheet that outlines all of the details of the Order.

Today’s feature was shared with us by the ADVANCE PI team. If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.

ADVANCE Weekly Roundup: Faculty workload equity

Inequitable workload assignments can impact faculty progress and success especially among pre-tenure and URM faculty. This week’s roundup is a blog post and paper that refer to a survey of mostly STEM departments that reveals inequities in faculty workloads. Most significantly, it includes links to a suite of strategies and policies that unit administrators can use to make improvements in a relatively short period of time. This includes identifying the preferred teaching and service assignments of faculty, making assignments equitably, and promoting transparency in workload systems and expectations. Using these tools to resolve workload inequities is critical to eliminating such pernicious issues. The ultimate goal is to realize not only immediate but also long term improvements on race and gender equity.

Today’s feature was shared with us by the ADVANCE PI team. If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. These articles are available on the ADVANCE Newsblog (https://blogs.mtu.edu/advance/). To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.