Category Archives: Awards and Accolades

Sorby Elected President of ASEE

Professor Emerita Sheryl Sorby (ME-EM) has been elected president of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE).

The ASEE recently elected eight officers to its Board of Directors. The board members will begin their terms at our annual conference in June in Tampa. The following is a list of the elected officers.

Sorby, professor of Engineering Education, University of Cinncinati, was elected president-elect, a term she will hold one year before assuming the presidency in 2020.

Posted in Tech Today, April 18, 2019


Morrison Selected for Dean’s Teaching Showcase

Dean Janet Callahan, College of Engineering, has selected Faith Morrison, Professor of Chemical Engineering and associate dean, for the Dean’s Teaching Showcase.

Callahan chose Morrison not only for her excellent and innovative teaching, but also for extensive historical involvement in academic advising and planning for assessment, especially for Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc. (ABET).

Callahan’s words, “Professor Morrison has been focused on improving the Chemical Engineering undergraduate program throughout her career.  She has been heavily involved in academic advising, assessment activities, and implementing new pedagogy to enrich her students’ learning experience. Dr. Morrison’s continuous drive to improve student learning is an inspiration to us all.”

In his nominating letter, Chemical Engineering Chair Pradeep Agrawal focused mostly on Morrison’s unique and deeply-considered teaching philosophy. He especially emphasized her willingness to continually be “flexible in developing her teaching approach to match the learning style of a younger generation.”

One such contribution that has clearly been well received is a series of YouTube videos published by Morrison on rheology and momentum transport, several of which have more than 100,000 views.

Morrison believes her fundamental purpose is to teach students how to learn, and that keeping them active in the classroom is important to this end. In her words, she gives students a chance to “attempt solutions and see how their ideas work — I allow them to lead the problem‐solving, since I believe they benefit from following where their ideas lead.”

This does not mean she allows them complete freedom. Morrison carefully chooses activities and scaffolds discussions, taking “great care to identify and organize classroom topics and to keep the conversation going.”

Agrawal also emphasized this active and carefully customized approach, which Morrison applies even in larger classes. “Faith finds ways to engage students regardless of the class size. Her approach encourages all students to achieve a minimum level of proficiency in order to pass her course, but she also provides “stretch” assignments to students aspiring to earn top grades. These “stretch” assignments are harder problems, designed to challenge the top performing students. Her unorthodox approach allows the students to work at a level commensurate with their aspirations, but also ensures a minimum level of preparedness of the subject matter. ”

Finally, Morrison was selected because, according to Agrawal, she “earns the respect of her students, in spite of maintaining a rigorous work load and standards.” Faith carefully balances the ability to “meet students where they are” and setting a high -— but still appropriate — level of challenge. In her words, she has “found that when I set expectations where I need them to be, the students are able to rise to the occasion.”

Morrison will be recognized at an end-of-term luncheon with other showcase members, and is now eligible for one of three new teaching awards to be given by the William G. Jackson Center for Teaching and Learning this summer recognizing introductory or large class teaching, innovative or outside the classroom teaching methods, or work in curriculum and assessment.

Originally posted in Tech Today, March 22 by Michael R. Meyer, Director William G. Jackson CTL


Green Takes Part in Global Environmental Outlook

Sarah Green (Chem) has been in Nairobi, Kenya for the launch of the Sixth Global Environmental Outlook (GEO-6) at the United Nations Environmental Assembly (UNEA).

The GEO report assesses the state and trends of the environment, as well as examining the policies meant to improve it. Green has served as co-chair of the Scientific Advisory Panel for the report since its early planning meetings in 2015.
The 744-page GEO report identifies the key drivers of environmental degradation around the world in the context of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and other international agreements. It calls for integrated social, economic, and environmental policy actions to address critical issues such as air pollution, biodiversity loss, ocean health, climate change, and land degradation. Human health and well-being are intertwined with the health of the planet through the food, water, and natural systems we depend on.
The report guides governments, non-governmental organizations, and businesses in strategies to design successful policies. GEO also investigate pathways to environmentally sustainable development and synergies among the SDGs.
As co-chair of the Scientific Advisory Panel, Green, with co-chair Nicholas King (Cape Town, South Africa), guided the process of ensuring scientific integrity of GEO, including selection of authors, outline of topics, and the review process.
Since 2015 Green has attended meetings of authors and government representatives in Bangkok, Geneva, Cairo, Cancun, Guangzhou, Singapore and Nairobi.
She hopes to communicate the findings of GEO to a wide audience.
Posted in Tech Today, March 14, 2019


Huntoon Honored by Science Teachers Group

Michigan Tech Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs Jacqueline Huntoon, has received a Lifetime Achievement Award from a statewide science educators organization.

The Michigan Science Teachers Association (MSTA) named Huntoon the recipient of the 2019 George G. Mallinson Award. The highest honor bestowed by the MSTA, the award recognizes Huntoon’s contributions to science education in general and to MSTA in particular.

In announcing the award, MSTA noted “Over the course of her career, Dr. Huntoon has made extraordinary contributions to the advancement of science education through her work at the local, state and national level.”

In a letter supporting Huntoon for the recognition, MSTA Board Member Yonee Bryant- Kuiphoff, wrote that as a science teacher, a professional developing and writing curriculum and one working statewide with other teachers, she feels “much more confident” as a result of Huntoon’s mentorship.

Bryant-Kuiphoff wrote that through Huntoon’s vision for science education and her belief in participants in the Michigan Science Teaching and Assessment Reform (Mi-STAR) program, Huntoon is able to develop and lead others into a new pedagogy of science education. “I believe that Dr. Jacqueline Huntoon is the epitome of the Mallinson Award criteria, with her long lasting and far reaching contributions to the field of science education,” Bryant-Kuiphoff said.

Huntoon says she is honored by the award. “I am very thankful to receive this recognition from MSTA. The work teachers do is very important for the future of society. We owe a lot to teachers. It is a great honor to receive this recognition from this group.”

Prior to her current position at Michigan Tech, Huntoon served as associate provost and dean of the University’s Graduate School. She has been recognized nationally for her leadership in higher education and geology. She currently serves as a member of the federal STEM Education Advisory Panel. She is a former chair of the Graduate Record Exam Board, which oversees exams most commonly used to evaluate the qualifications of students applying for graduate school. She has previously served as the program director for diversity and education at the National Science Foundation’s Directorate for Geosciences.

Huntoon will be honored at MSTA’s Annual Meeting Friday and Saturday (March 1/2) in Grand Rapids. MSTA provides awards to Michigan science teachers, administrators and education professionals in eight categories in addition to the prestigious Mallinson Award.

On receiving the honor; Huntoon said, “I feel very fortunate to have worked with so many teachers in Michigan throughout my career. We’ve accomplished amazing things together and I look forward to continuing to collaborate in the future.”

By Mark Wilcox

Tech Today, Feb. 25, 2019


Van Kooy Selected to Receive Fulbright Award

Dana Van Kooy (HU) has been selected to receive the 2019-20 Fulbright National Library of Scotland Award. She will spend six months at the National Library of Scotland in Edinburgh researching topics relevant to her current book project, “Atlantic Configurations of Modernity and the Aesthetics of Disappearance.”

Van Kooy will also contribute to the library’s public lecture program, and reach out to several universities in Scotland to facilitate conversations about her research.

Tech Today, Feb. 20, 2019


Darnishia Slade Honored by NSBE

The award is named after the late Bayard Rustin, a civil rights leader who worked with Martin Luther King Jr. and was an organizer for the March on Washington and other protests.

Stuart Liburd, Jr., president of Tech’s NSBE chapter said Slade was as deserving recipient of the first Bayard Rustin Award  as she exemplifiles Rustin’s commitment and “behind the scenes” work.

“In Darnishia’s time here at Michigan Tech, she has helped elevate sudents, faculty and the whole University community to obtain a level of utmost excellence that empowers us so we can be our best selves.”

Calling the award the biggest compliment she has ever received, Slade says she is still taken aback by the award. “This means so much to me because it came from the students.” Slade says she feels a connection with Rustin in that his work, like hers, is essentially grass roots. “He didn’t mind getting his hands dirty. And he never gave up on his convictions that minorities in the United States could, and would, succeed.

In remarks upon accepting the award at the MLK Banquet, Slade said she feels it’s important to “pay it forward” to students because of mentors she’s had, such as Betty Chavis, Gloria Melton and the late Inetta Harris.

Slade is an alumna of Michigan Tech and is currently a PhD student in Applied Cognitive Science and Human Factors.

Published in Tech Today, January 30, 2019 by Mark Wilcox

 


Stockero named Outstanding Reviewer

Shari Stockero (CLS/Math) has been named the 2019 Mathematics Teacher Education Outstanding Reviewer by the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators.

Her research focuses on noticing high-potential instances of student mathematical thinking (MOSTs) and understanding what it means to productively use these instances to support student learning. Specifically, in her current work, she and her colleagues are working with a group of teacher-researchers from across the U.S. to enact and study the teaching practice of building on MOSTs. She is also working on a project to develop middle school science teacher leaders in Michigan.

Posted in Tech Today, January 15, 2019



Barr elected to IEEE Professional Communication Society Board of Governors

Nancy Barr (ME-EM) has been elected to the IEEE Professional Communication Society’s board of governors.

The PCS’s mission is to foster a community dedicated to understanding and promoting effective communication in engineering, scientific and other technical environments.

Barr’s three-year term began Jan. 1 and runs to December 31, 2021.

Posted in Tech Today, January 11, 2019 by Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics