March 12, 2021 Weekly Roundup: 8 Practical, Sustainable Steps to a Diverse Faculty

A strategic and sustainable approach to realizing a more diverse faculty is both overdue and critical to the future of higher education. Two university deans offer timely advice for enacting such an approach. They recommend introducing BIPOC faculty to the university’s unique features and facilities through invited presentations, postdocs, or conferences in order to create positive impressions and connections even before a hire is possible. Proactive recruitment beyond the “post and hope” method is necessary but takes care and both individual and collective effort. Apart from the start-up package, robust systems of support for faculty development should be available, utilized, and affirmed by academic leaders. Such strategies are “neither mysterious nor terrifically expensive.”

If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.
The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. These articles are available on the ADVANCE Newsblog (https://blogs.mtu.edu/advance/). To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.


Mothers Rebuild: Solutions to Overcome COVID-19 Challenges

by Allison Mills, University Marketing and Communications

Over the summer and fall, paper after paper revealed that mothers are one of the demographics hardest hit by the pandemic. From layoffs and leaving careers to do caretaking, to submission rate decreases and additional service projects, the data were clear, but the follow up less so. Many of the problems are not new and will remain after the pandemic. But a new paper, published this week in PLOS Biology, outlines methods to help solve them.

“In the spirit of the well-worn adage ‘never let a good crisis go to waste,’ we propose using these unprecedented times as a springboard for necessary, substantive and lasting change,” write the paper’s 13 co-authors, including Amy Marcarelli (Bio Sci), who helped lead the paper’s section addressing professional societies. She sees the work through her lens as an ecosystem ecologist.

“Some of my most recent work has been around cascading and indirect effects and how effects viewed on short time scales may have very different outcomes at long time scales,” Marcarelli said. “What I’ve learned from that research is that you can’t abstract a single characteristic of an organism and expect that to explain its ecological role. And [in academia] we try so often to treat ourselves as researchers — and not as mothers and partners and daughters and leaders — and that’s to the detriment of all of us. It’s to the detriment of us as individuals but it’s also to the detriment of our academic system because if we don’t treat people as whole people then we fail them.”

Marcarelli joined researchers who are also parents to outline ways to help mothers recover and rebuild academic careers during and after the pandemic. Read their solutions on mtu.edu/news and follow the conversation with @mturesearch on Twitter.


March 5, 2021 Weekly Roundup: Focus on culture to overcome imposter syndrome

Today’s edition of the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup features an article from Harvard Business Review on ways an organization can support individuals to reduce imposter syndrome. Imposter syndrome, coined in 1978, describes the feeling of doubting one’s abilities, second guessing one’s accomplishments, and having mild-anxiety about work success. Imposter syndrome places the blame for feeling this way on the individual rather than considering how the organization’s historical and cultural context sends signals to women, particularly women of color, about their professional contributions. Rather than seeking to correct the individual, the answer lies in creating organizations that position racial, ethnic, and gender diversity as the norm. Addressing systemic bias and toxic cultures can reduce experiences that lead to imposter syndrome and maximize the net productivity of all members of the community.

Today’s feature was shared with us by the Advocates and Allies Advisory Board. If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. These articles are available on the ADVANCE Newsblog (https://blogs.mtu.edu/advance/). To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.


Nancy Langston awarded Distinguished Scholar Award from the American Society for Environmental History

Nancy Langston (SS/CFRES) has been awarded the 2021 Distinguished Scholar Award from the American Society for Environmental History. This award is given to one individual each year who has contributed significantly to environmental history scholarship and recognizes exceptional lifetime achievement in the field.

Langston has published five books and more than 50 peer-reviewed papers, and she has been awarded more than a million dollars in competitive external funding. Her current research, on woodland caribou and other migratory wildlife of the north, is supported with a Fulbright Research Chair, a Mellon Fellowship, a Mandel Award in the Humanities, and an NSF research grant in Science and Technology Studies.

Source: Tech Today, February 26, 2021


February 26, 2021 ADVANCE Weekly Roundup

Cultures in academia were established more than a century ago when everyone hailed from the same demographic.  While cultures have slowly evolved, fair treatment according to student/faculty needs have not all been addressed which means inequity remains deeply rooted in academia. Systemic inequities can manifest in a number of ways, including the peer review process. In fact in some journals such as Econometrica, submit-accept times for female authored papers take six months longer to complete peer review (Hengel 2016). Today’s edition of the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup highlights a guest editorial from the Journal of Engineering Education that grapples with the experience of systemic racism in peer review. It recounts the experiences of a Black, engineering education graduate student and her advisor and issues a call to action to confront and overcome systemic inequities in the academy.

If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. These articles are available on the ADVANCE Newsblog (https://blogs.mtu.edu/advance/). To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.


February 18 2021 ADVANCE Weekly Roundup

The COVID-19 pandemic has had profound impacts on all aspects of academia. An article from Science reports that recent studies indicate that the pandemic’s impact has hit academic mothers particularly hard. It has exacerbated existing disparities and created further challenges for women, including significant loss of time dedicated to research. Today’s edition of the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup features this article which encourages the use and consideration of COVID-19 impact statements in current and post-pandemic tenure and promotion reviews.

If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. These articles are available on the ADVANCE Newsblog (https://blogs.mtu.edu/advance/). To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.


AccessADVANCE Community of Practice: Advancing women with disabilities in academic STEM careers

You are invited to participate in discussions and learn of opportunities to promote the increased participation of women with disabilities in STEM faculty careers.

A collaboration between North Dakota State University and the University of Washington funded by the National Science Foundation, AccessADVANCE aims to increase the participation and advancement of women with disabilities in academic STEM careers.

In the AccessADVANCE Community of Practice (CoP) participants share ideas and assist in the creation and dissemination of resources to encourage others to support women with disabilities. CoP members

  • plan, attend, and recruit others to attend project training and capacity-building opportunities;
  • ensure women with disabilities are invited to events that promote their pursuit of and support in academic STEM career positions;
  • share strategies for making departments more welcoming and accessible to women with disabilities;
  • discuss ways to build productive relationships with disability service offices that serve faculty;
  • recruit women faculty and senior graduate students with disabilities to the e-mentoring community; and
  • share resources.

You and your colleagues can join AccessADVANCE CoP by sending the following information to doit@uw.edu:

  • Name
  • Position/ Job Title
  • Institution
  • Postal Address
  • Email Address

NSF ADVANCE Seminars & Panels: 20 Years of ADVANCE and 30 Years of NSF Broadening Participation in STEM

Throughout the month of March, ADVANCE Institutions from around the country will be hosting seminars and panel presentations. See the list below for more details and registration links. We hope to see you there.

ADVANCE Seminars & Panels: 20 years of ADVANCE and 30 years of NSF Broadening Participation in STEMhttps://www.nsf.gov/events/event_summ.jsp?cntn_id=302062&WT

March 3, 2021 Presentation and Discussion on the StratEGIC toolkit and the 2020 book Building Gender Equity in the Academy: Institutional Strategies for Change

Speakers: Drs. Sandra Laursen, University of Colorado Boulder and Ann Austin, Michigan State University

Register for March 3 12pm to 1:30pm ESTMarch 10, 2021 Faculty Equity in a Time of COVID Panel 

Panelists: Drs. Jessi Smith, University of Colorado Colorado Springs; Leslie Gonzales, Michigan State University; Kimberly Griffin, University of Maryland College Park; and Jeni Hart, University of Missouri

Register for March 10 12pm to 1:30pm ESTMarch 17, 2021 AccessADVANCE Infusing Accessibility into ADVANCE Strategies

Speakers: Drs. Sheryl Burgstahler and Brianna Blaser, University of Washington DO-IT Center

Register for March 17 12pm to 1:30pm EDTMarch 24, 2021  Systemic Change in Minority-Serving Institutions

Panelists: Drs. Marcia Owens, Florida A&M University; Anna Lee, North Carolina A&T University; Stassi DiMaggio, Xavier University; Suzanna Rose, Florida International University; Stephanie Jones, Texas Tech University; and Ala Qubbaj, University of Texas Rio Grade Valley

Register for March 24 2pm to 1:30pm EDTMarch 31, 2021 Presentation and Discussion of the 2018 book An Inclusive Academy: Achieving Diversity and Excellence

Speakers: Drs. Virginia Valian, Hunter College and Abbigail Stewart, University of Michigan

Register for March 31 2pm to 1:30pm EDT


February 12, 2021 ADVANCE Weekly Roundup

Incorrect assumptions on the part of one or both parties during discourse can often push “hot buttons” and devolve an otherwise civil conversation into a conflict. Learning and listening plummets as tensions rise.  When conflict arises, the way in which we respond is far more telling than we may think. Today’s featured article for the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup outlines “7 Steps To Transform Conflict Into Collegiality.” As members of the Michigan Tech CommUNITY how we treat each other during discussions is also important.  Listening to understand, and focusing on the concepts instead of labeling the person, helps us all learn and grow while maintaining collegiality and space for all individuals to thrive.

If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. These articles are available on the ADVANCE Newsblog (https://blogs.mtu.edu/advance/). To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.


February 5, 2021 ADVANCE Weekly Roundup

What is white privilege? In some ways, it’s easier to understand what it’s not rather than what it is. It’s not an outright denial that white people have never struggled nor does it assume that everything a white person has accomplished is unearned. Rather, white privilege refers to an ingrained knowledge, often invisible to those who have always had it, that’s distinct from abilities, efforts, or income. That knowledge (or familiarity) allows some to navigate a situation with ease, while those without that prior knowledge struggle.  Today’s edition of the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup comes from tolerance.org and unpacks this “double whammy” term that often inspires pushback. It acknowledges that “white privilege exists because of historic, enduring racism and biases,” explores the history of the term, and offers suggestions for what to do once white privilege has been recognized. This article brings to the forefront a critical concept for furthering diversity, equity, and inclusion. 

If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. These articles are available on the ADVANCE Newsblog (https://blogs.mtu.edu/advance/). To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.