Tag: Faculty

Assistant Professors, Associate Professors, Full Professors, Lecturers, faculty-related items.

ADVANCE Weekly Roundup: Eliminating the penalties for motherhood in STEM

The COVID-19 pandemic has called attention to the impediments that women in STEM face as mothers, including a multipronged “maternal wall” with career-long ramifications. This week’s Roundup takes you to a virtual conference, “Motherhood and career retention in STEM: Systemic barriers and actionable solutions” held on May 5, 2021. The event was sponsored by Mothers in Science and features lucid summaries and original research into the challenges and structural barriers for women in STEM and in faculty careers more broadly as well as actionable solutions. A summary of the conference issues appeared in The Scientist featuring Mothers in Science co-founder Isabel Torres, a PhD in genetics and mother of four. Refreshingly, the presentation videos often reveal the presence of children, a deliberate strategy to make visible the work that must go on behind-the-scenes by academic mothers.

Today’s feature was shared with us by the ADVANCE team. If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.

ADVANCE Weekly Roundup: Teaching the Neurodiverse

Are you wondering how best to teach students who are on the spectrum?  In today’s ADVANCE Weekly Roundup, a college teacher who herself is on the spectrum corrects some myths about the neurodiverse and provides recommendations for teaching them. One of the myths is that autism is limited to young white men; but it affects people of all races, genders, and ages. Diagnoses in adults and in women are both on the rise. Also, autism affects each individual in different ways, so challenging the diagnosis because it doesn’t conform to stereotypes is a poor strategy. Read this week’s article on 10 Things Faculty Need to Understand about Autism to improve your classroom skills.

Today’s feature was shared with us by Sonia Goltz. If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.

ADVANCE Weekly Roundup: STEMinists: Young role models for women in STEM

Today’s ADVANCE post celebrates the positive influence that faculty can have on the success of students. Specifically, we note how women and under-represented faculty in STEM serve as role models, whether through their presence in classrooms and labs or in professional associations such as WIA or AISES’s Lighting the Pathway program. In this American Psychological Association Science Brief on her research into women’s experiences in STEM fields, Dr. Isis Settles (U of Michigan) describes studies that document the structural and interpersonal challenges that discourage women from remaining in STEM fields. However, she also found evidence for a protective factor associated with resilience and concludes, “Strong gender identification may help women in STEM to function well (both psychologically and in terms of their academic/work performance).”

The website STEMinist offers an inspiring example of such an identity by providing dozens of short biographies of young women who have navigated college and secured fulfilling careers in STEM. It is heartening that these young women seem to hold a woman-in-STEM identity as central to their STEM careers and we applaud STEM women faculty as role models.

Today’s feature was shared with us by David Flaspohler If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.

Mentoring for Associate Professors Next Week

Advanced Career Management (ACM) will offer an open “Office Hour” for mid-career faculty during the week of November 1-5. The event will pair an associate-level faculty member with a full professor to discuss career-related topics. The theme of this event is “Upgrade Your Profile.” Faculty can raise other topics of interest, but are encouraged to review CVs and discuss strategies for accomplishing high-value career goals.

Associate professors who are interested in participating should email advance-mtu@mtu.edu with their contact information. The ADVANCE office will suggest a one-hour meeting time based on calendar availabilities for the mentor and mentee. Both an in-person location and a Zoom link will be provided. Participating mentors include Will Cantrell (Associate Provost and Dean, Graduate School), Shiyue Fang (Professor, Chemistry), Adrienne Minnerick (Professor, Chemical Engineering), and Judith Perlinger (Environmental Sciences).

The ACM program is an initiative of ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion.

Mentors

Adrienne R. Minerick
Director and PI, ADVANCE at Michigan Tech
Professor, Chemical Engineering
President, American Society for Engineering Education

Adrienne R. Minerick is President of the American Society for Engineering Education (2021-2022), Director of ADVANCE at Michigan Tech and Professor of Chemical Engineering.  She has served as Associate Dean for Research and Innovation in the College of Engineering, Assistant to the Provost for Faculty Development, Dean of the School of Technology, founded the College of Computing and most recently served as Interim Dean of the Pavlis Honors College. She has received numerous honors and awards, including the distinction of Fellow of AAAS and ASEE, a National Science Foundation CAREER Award, the Raymond W. Fahien Award from the Chemical Engineering Division of ASEE, and Michigan Tech’s Fredrick D. Williams Instructional Innovation Award. She and her students have published over 75 archival journal publications, book chapters, or proceedings articles and earned 23 best paper/presentation awards. Adrienne previously served as the President of the American Electrophoresis Society and on the ASEE’s Board of Directors as First Vice President and Professional Interest Council I Chair. She also chaired ASEE’s National Diversity Committee. Her research and service interests regularly intersect and involve underserved individuals with an emphasis on research experiences to increase engagement and retention.

Will Cantrell
Associate Provost and Dean of the Graduate School
Professor, Physics

Will Cantrell joined Physics in the fall of 2001. Since then, he has served as the faculty representative for the Goldwater Scholarship, the coordinator for the Summer Undergraduate Fellowship (SURF) program, director of the Earth Planetary and Space Sciences Institute (EPSSI), and associate dean in the Graduate School. In July of 2020, he stepped into the position of Associate Provost for Graduate Education and Dean of the Graduate School.
In the summer, you might find him roll casting to a rising trout on the Otter River.

Shiyue Fang
Professor of Chemistry

Dr. Shiyue Fang is a synthetic organic chemist. He obtained PhD in organometallic chemistry and conducted postdoctoral study in nucleic acid chemistry. Currently, projects in his research group include the development of technologies for sensitive DNA and RNA synthesis and non-chromatographic purification of DNA and peptide, synthesis of mono-disperse polyethylene glycol and derivatives, discovery of new organic transformations, and the use of organic synthesis to address fundamental physical chemical and biological questions. 

Judith A. Perlinger
Professor, Environmental Engineering

Dr. Perlinger teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in environmental engineering including Fundamentals of Environmental Engineering, Sustainability, Transport and Transformation of Organic Pollutants, and Applied Boundary Layer Micrometeorology. Her research interests are in the areas of air and water quality and sustainability with projects focused on processes at environmental and disciplinary interfaces. For example, to study environmental processing of chemicals, she has employed field, laboratory, computational, and modeling approaches. Her recent research activities have related to the atmosphere, sustainability, and the Great Lakes and involve measurement and modeling of atmospheric and aqueous chemical concentrations and atmosphere-surface exchange fluxes, and examination of the chemical governance and sustainability.

ADVANCE Weekly Roundup: Metastudy on Biases in Student Teaching Evaluations

Research into Student Teaching Evaluations often focus on what such evaluations actually measure and the inherent biases about instructors that can disadvantage or advantage particular faculty. This article in Inside Higher Ed reports on a metastudy that addresses both measurement and equity biases in student evaluations and suggests strategic responses for higher education institutions. One issue of concern is the relative lack of research attention to issues of racial and intersectional identity bias–most equity bias research is on gender. The metastudy found a “gender affinity” bias that may extend to race as well. One recommendation is that administrators should temper reliance on student evaluations with alternative and complementary assessments for evaluating teaching such as teaching portfolios and reviews of pedagogical materials. 

Today’s feature was shared with us by Dr. Cinzia Cervato, Professor at Iowa State University and PI of the ADVANCE Partnership Grant which includes Michigan Tech. If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.

Film Premiere: ‘The Lake at the Bottom of the World’

A new feature-length documentary film, “The Lake at the Bottom of the World,” premiers on Saturday (Oct. 16) at 5 p.m. in the 14th annual Imagine Science Film Festival.

The documentary is an epic story of the search for life in the lakes beneath Antarctica, and includes work and commentary by Trista Vick-Majors (BioSci).

The film is free to watch at the time of the premiere, or can be streamed later for $10. You must RSVP for the virtual film screening (you will need to create an account).

A post-screening livestream discussion with the film crew and scientists will follow the film’s premiere.

The Imagine Science Film Festival is being held virtually Oct. 15-22 on Labocine. The festival is an experimental, interdisciplinary, weeklong series of events to open new dialogues between scientists, filmmakers and artists.

This year’s theme of RESISTANCE will highlight the act of swimming against the current — not for futile reasons, but to spark change and awareness — and will explore the act of resisting from the micro to the macro level: 

  • What does it mean to withstand opposing forces that sometimes feel overwhelming?
  • How does resistance measure a material’s ability to resist the flow of electrons through it?
  • How do organisms resist harmful influences such as disease, toxic agents or infection?

ADVANCE Weekly Roundup: Hispanic Heritage Month: Celebrate STEM Latinx researchers while also noting gender disparities

Hispanic Heritage Month is an opportunity to recognize the accomplishments of Hispanic and Latinx scientists and engineers whose groundbreaking discoveries have advanced our knowledge.  This article provides a gender diverse list of role models for students across a variety of STEM careers.  We encourage you to feature these notable scientists in your courses.

Today’s feature was shared with us by the ADVANCE PI Team. If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.

ADVANCE Weekly Roundup: Do you promote safe space for discussions of authorship that are fair and equitable?

It is well documented that women are underrepresented in senior author positions on published and scholarly works, and more harshly treated in the peer review process. Women are also more likely to be involved in disagreements about authorship than men, and face greater negative consequences of such disagreements. This is one of the findings reported in this week’s article that focuses on the outcomes of over 5000 survey responses in the fields of social sciences, medical sciences, and natural sciences and engineering. Awareness of these issues is critical if we are to promote more equitable attribution of work, and recognize the need to discuss authorship in an open and fair manner.

Today’s feature was shared with us by Glenn Larkin, Senior Research Scientist in the College of Forest Resources and Environmental Science. If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.

Women Also Know Stuff presentation with Dr. Nadia Brown

Picture is of Dr. Nadia Brown from Georgetown University
Dr. Nadia Brown, Professor of Government, chair of the Women’s and Gender Studies program, and affiliate in the African American Studies program at Georgetown University

WMU, in collaboration with Michigan Technological University, Iowa State University, and North Dakota State University, is hosting a virtual presentation and Q&A to enhance awareness of gender bias and continued lack of diversity in STEM fields. This event will take place Thursday, October 7 at 7 p.m. EDT. RSVP: https://bit.ly/3leQets

Women Also Know Stuff(WAKS) works to highlight the expertise of women and thus push back against implicit gender bias. The organization aims to connect expert women in political science with professional networking opportunities, while also making it easy for those seeking experts, including journalists, to find women experts in any given subfield of political science. Join Dr. Nadia Brown for a virtual presentation and Q&A detailing what WAKS did and is doing to increase gender diversity in political science.

Come Together: Building an Equitable Department Where Faculty Want to Work and Stay

The Department Chair Professional Development Workshop Series aims to strengthen the abilities of department chairs to lead change by cultivating inclusive and supportive work environments for all faculty.  Workshops will address the challenges of faculty evaluation, department culture, work-life integration, and diversity, equity and inclusion, with appropriate attention to the ongoing impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on faculty careers.  Facilitated workshop sessions are open to chairs from all four campuses as a way to share cross-institutional best practices.  

Our virtual workshop is titled Come Together:  Building an Equitable Department Where Faculty Want to Work and Stay.  To accommodate schedules, this facilitated workshop is offered on two separate dates:

Department chairs are invited to sign up for one of the two workshop dates using the corresponding registration links.  Workshop materials will be provided closer to the workshop date. 

Institutional Contacts:

For general information, please contact: Katharine Hensley, ISU Faculty Success Coordinator at  khensley@iastate.edu.