Tag: Workplace

Topics impacting performance, perception of performance, sense of belonging in the workplace.

ADVANCE Weekly Roundup: What to do in the moment when being bullied

We have all experienced bullying at work and upon reflection we often think we could have handled the moment better. Each time we think “How could I have responded better?”, “What should I have said?”, “Why is this still bothering me?”  But how? In Liz Kislik’s blog, she shares exercises she uses with her clients to navigate the moments of bullying by a colleague. The first exercise is to ask yourself “Are you safe?” Recognizing that you are safe reduces the grip the bully has on you. The second exercise is to mentally imagine the bully as small and vulnerable standing in the palm of your hand. Since the source of the bullying behavior is insecurity and lack of control, this exercise redirects behavior to focus on the bully and not on the response.  This positions you to act in a manner that is measured and strategic instead of purely reactionary. Measured responses also allow supervisors to better recognize the source of the bullying behavior and hopefully work to correct problematic patterns of poor behavior.  

Today’s feature was shared with us by A3B. If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.

ADVANCE Weekly Roundup: Gender Inequities in Academic Medicine and the Life Sciences

You may have read the article in the New York Times that came out recently about women physicians earning 2 million less over their lifetimes than men physicians.This study and a variety of research topics on gender inequities within medicine and the academic life sciences are discussed in a recent Freakonomics MD podcast led by Dr. Bapu Jena of Harvard University. For example, the tendency of men researchers to “upsell” their research contributions within their academic papers with superlatives like novel, unique, and unprecedented is one factor thought to contribute to differences in citation rates, which are key drivers of pay differences between men and women. The podcast addresses other issues that have significant repercussions for equity in career advancement in STEM fields. It is well worth a listen.

Today’s feature was shared with us by Robert Hutchinson. If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.

ADVANCE Weekly Roundup: The importance of leaders developing support for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

This week’s article from the Journal of Diversity in Higher Education explores the importance of academic leadership in developing support for diversity, equity, inclusion, and sense of belonging (DEIS) among faculty. Academic leaders with more visibly favorable attitudes towards diversity positively influence faculty in their awareness and support for DEIS. This research suggests that this may be especially important for faculty who don’t often question the status quo of policies and practices that retain historic systemic bias. This article provides an opportunity for us to reflect on how we, along with our academic leaders, express favorable attitudes towards DEIS efforts and help our institution to make progress in this valued area. Although this study focused on academic leadership, it highlights opportunities we may have for influencing attitudes about DEIS in our professional and personal leadership roles.

Today’s feature was shared with us by the ADVANCE PI Team. If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.

Seminar: Preparation for Leading in DEI Work for Your Team

Dr. Candy McCorkle currently serves as the Vice President of Diversity and Inclusion at Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI. Prior to joining the senior administration of WMU she served as the Assistant Vice President of Student Affairs and the Director of Diversity and Inclusion at Alma College, Alma, MI.  In her more than 20 years in higher education she has served as faculty member, program director and assistant dean. Dr. McCorkle has served regional public universities, private liberal arts colleges, community colleges and taught abroad. She earned her B.A. in Psychology from Wright State University, Dayton, OH, her M.S. in Clinical Psychology from  Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI and her Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Supervision from Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI.  Dr. McCorkle has always demonstrated her commitment to moving organizations toward inclusivity.

Following the summer of 2020 many colleges and universities have begun to focus on the diversity, equity and inclusion.  Although this is an admirable focus it is shortsighted because most faculty, staff, administrators and students are not trained in how to integrate diversity, equity and inclusion into their work.  It is the purpose of this presentation to introduce participants to some of the competencies necessary for effectively engaging in diversity, equity and inclusion work.

The five basic skills will be explored and demonstrated how to use them to build the foundations of effectively engaging in diversity, equity and inclusion work. Individuals are more apt to engage in work when they feel they have the skills necessary to begin the work. It is the objective that upon the conclusion of this presentation individuals will be able to identify, describe and implement the five basic skills to begin leading their team in diversity, equity and inclusion work.

This seminar is virtual, and will be held Friday, Dec. 3 from 1-2pm Eastern Time. The zoom link is https://bit.ly/3cmrNpO. A Diversity and Inclusion Guidebook is also available for download/reading at https://bit.ly/3cpCMPp. Dr. McCorkle has also agreed to do a very limited number of one-on-one sessions after the seminar, which are by sign up only here.

As always, please feel free to contact the ADVANCE office at advance-mtu@mtu.edu if you have any questions or concerns!

ADVANCE Weekly Roundup: Foundational Strategies to Create Equitable Systems for Faculty

As pandemic effects continue, fostering equitable climates to retain high quality faculty and staff is more important than ever.  The UMass ADVANCE team outlines four foundational strategies: communication, resources, flexibility, and adapting equity-informed strategies. Meaningful communicative interactions and supportive resources are critical to faculty and staff job satisfaction.  In addition, flexible policies and practices remain key through these challenging times, especially those that address pandemic circumstances and impacts with equity-informed strategies. One key equity-informed strategy for TPR committees can be summed up as “Do not let the 25 percent of faculty able to be more productive during the global pandemic set the standard for the 75 percent who are not able to do so.” (University of Michigan Report).  These foundational strategies can help create a climate that benefits all through promoting the value of their contributions, and therefore helps to retain high quality faculty and staff.  

Today’s feature was shared with us by the ADVANCE PI team. If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.

ARC Network Webinars

Register for Ramon Goings and Joya Misra’s Final Research Webinars  The ARC Network is excited to begin our series hosting members of the 2020-2021 Virtual Visiting Scholars (VVS) cohort to present on their VVS projects and discuss the implications of their findings!  The VVS program annually supports 2-4 selected scholars to complete metasyntheses and meta-analyses of existing literature on topics relevant to equity in STEM.Ramon Goings

“Examining How Race/Ethnicity and Gender is Explored in Research on STEM Contingent Faculty”
Oct 28, 2021 03:00 PM ET  
Dr. Goings will present on his meta-analysis of research on contingent STEM faculty to assess the inclusion of faculty at the intersection of race/ethnicity and gender.Register


Joya Misra

“Gender, Intersectionality, Workload and Leadership in STEM Departments”
Nov 4, 2021 03:00 PM EST  
Dr. Misra will present her work focusing on impacts of intersectional identity on and inclusion in decision-making and leadership with additional emphasis on retention and career advancement of faculty.Register

ADVANCE Weekly Roundup: Safety is everyone’s responsibility

Safety in any workplace, whether corporate or academic, is not achieved  by just providing students, faculty and staff with appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) to conduct their research or work safely. Creating safety in the workplace also includes intentionally crafting a psychologically safe environment where individuals feel they can speak up, express their concerns, and be heard. The author of “The Fearless Organization” describes how the culture of psychological safety is evident when individuals can voice half-finished thoughts, are willing to admit lack of knowledge, listen humbly, and engage in dynamic dialogue to learn and adopt what is best for students, faculty, and staff.

The author notes, “As organizations seek to convert diversity into inclusion and belonging, psychological safety is increasingly important. Without psychological safety, diversity does not automatically mean people can bring their full selves to the work.” Thus, you can think of psychological safety as the PPE for a diverse and inclusive workplace. The difference here is that the entire group provides protection rather than requiring each individual to protect themselves.

Today’s feature was shared with us by the Advocates and Allies Advisory Board (A3B). If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.

ADVANCE Weekly Roundup: Do you promote safe space for discussions of authorship that are fair and equitable?

It is well documented that women are underrepresented in senior author positions on published and scholarly works, and more harshly treated in the peer review process. Women are also more likely to be involved in disagreements about authorship than men, and face greater negative consequences of such disagreements. This is one of the findings reported in this week’s article that focuses on the outcomes of over 5000 survey responses in the fields of social sciences, medical sciences, and natural sciences and engineering. Awareness of these issues is critical if we are to promote more equitable attribution of work, and recognize the need to discuss authorship in an open and fair manner.

Today’s feature was shared with us by Glenn Larkin, Senior Research Scientist in the College of Forest Resources and Environmental Science. If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.

Come Together: Building an Equitable Department Where Faculty Want to Work and Stay

The Department Chair Professional Development Workshop Series aims to strengthen the abilities of department chairs to lead change by cultivating inclusive and supportive work environments for all faculty.  Workshops will address the challenges of faculty evaluation, department culture, work-life integration, and diversity, equity and inclusion, with appropriate attention to the ongoing impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on faculty careers.  Facilitated workshop sessions are open to chairs from all four campuses as a way to share cross-institutional best practices.  

Our virtual workshop is titled Come Together:  Building an Equitable Department Where Faculty Want to Work and Stay.  To accommodate schedules, this facilitated workshop is offered on two separate dates:

Department chairs are invited to sign up for one of the two workshop dates using the corresponding registration links.  Workshop materials will be provided closer to the workshop date. 

Institutional Contacts:

For general information, please contact: Katharine Hensley, ISU Faculty Success Coordinator at  khensley@iastate.edu.

ADVANCE Weekly Roundup: Confronting Ableism and Improving Climate

Beginning a new school year can be a moment for recognizing and challenging ingrained patterns and perspectives in order to create a more inclusive and welcoming campus community. One pernicious aspect of campus life is the pervasive ableism that often goes unacknowledged. Ableism refers to the beliefs, practices, and physical arrangements that disadvantage and stigmatize those with disabilities, whether visible or invisible. One of this week’s articles asks, “Where are the disabled and ill academics?” noting that a higher percentage of students disclose their disability status than faculty. Another article points out that the dominant conceptions of disability make claiming a disability a professionally risky move, especially voluntarily disclosing an invisible disability like a neurodiverse condition. A third article by a professor with a visible disability warns that accommodations may inadvertently impose “unreasonable adjustments” that require “additional unpaid labor.” Crafting a welcoming, inclusive, and accessible campus includes re-examining dominant perceptions and caricatures of disabilities, listening respectfully to experiences of ableism, stigma, and the complexities of accommodation, and working together for more responsive policies and practices.

Today’s feature was shared with us by the ADVANCE team. If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.