Day: May 28, 2019

Gagnon, Huntoon, and Zhao Recognized as Notable Women in STEM

Three Michigan Tech women are among the “Notable Women in Stem” named by Crain’s Detroit Business editors.

Valoree Gagnon, Director of University-Indigenous Community Partnerships, Great Lakes Research Center

Jacqueline Huntoon, Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs

Feng Zhao, Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering

According to Crain’s (5/28/2019): The women featured in this Notable Women in STEM report were selected by a team of Crain’s Detroit Business editors based on their career accomplishments, track record of success in the field, contributions to their community and mentorship of others, as outlined in a detailed nomination form.

Congratulations for this well-deserved recognition!

See: https://www.crainsdetroit.com/awards/notable-women-stem?utm_source=crain-s-special-report&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20190528&utm_content=article1-readmore


What Does a Scientist Look Like?

Close your eyes and visualize a scientist. What do you see? Do you picture a male? A female? Is your scientist in a lab coat and surrounded by chemicals and fancy equipment? Perhaps your scientist is in waders or measuring a tree. Our perspective on who or what makes a scientist may vary based on our experiences, our background, or perhaps our culture. What is important however, is that we realize that science, in order to be at it’s best, must be inclusive. We must have scientists from a variety of backgrounds because our individual life experiences  shape our perspective and unique perspectives are what lead to breakthroughs.

Just this morning, the ADVANCE team found an article in Science magazine referencing an article about how children perceive scientists. In the article, a group of scholars analyzed 5 decades of “draw-a-scientist” studies conducted on school aged children. They found that students depict scientists as female 34% of the time as of 2016, up from 1% in the 1960s and 1970s. A breakdown by gender found that female students are now depicting female scientists nearly 50% of the time, again, up from 1% in the 1960s and 1970s. These numbers are encouraging but still highlight the need for increased education on what makes a scientist so that our children realize anyone can be a scientist.

Want to learn more?

Visit this link for the article from Science.

For a more in-depth look, the study from Child Development can be found here.